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Old April 21st, 2007, 10:18 PM   #361
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"Testdrive" is funny?
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Old April 22nd, 2007, 01:51 AM   #362
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didn't notice that myself.

On a side note, how fast are trolley buses anyways??? While I've heard they have fantastic acceleration, from what I've been able to dig up their max speeds are only around 60km/h. While they might be good for downtown city buses that stop frequently, most of these bi-articulated buses are designed for BRT applications over larger metro areas. Also, since one of the reasons for such low top speeds I've read is because if the buses go too fast, the hooks can disconnected, if it had its own dedicated lane could this problem be resolved???

If not, it really is a shame, cause a lot of more spread out cities would really benefit from bi-articulated buses that would not eat up have the transit budget in oil costs alone.
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Old June 15th, 2007, 04:42 AM   #363
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China's Subway Construction Graze Creates Opportunities for Manufacturers

Subway construction craze creates opportunities for manufacturers
16 May 2007
Shanghai Daily



China is racing to expand its metro lines as urbanization increases, creating business opportunities for domestic and overseas subway equipment and car manufacturers.

Of 43 Chinese cities with a population exceeding one million, 30 have applied to build metro lines, said officials with the Urban Rail Transit Committee under the China Communications and Transportation Association.

Meanwhile, the State Council has given approval to 15 cities to start metro construction and more cities will be given the green light in the near future, committee officials said.

"Demand for efficient and green public transport is increasing in metropolises like Shanghai and Beijing as well as in fast growing second-tier cities," said Zhou Yimin, vice director of the urban rail transit committee. "The next 10 years will see a big jump in metro line construction."

About 600 billion yuan (US$78 billion) is expected to be invested in building subways and light rails before 2010, when the total length of subway lines will surpass 1,500 kilometers, according to the committee.

Investment totaled 200 billion yuan in the five years ended 2005, the committee said.

The metro boom is good news for subway-car and equipment makers, including global names such as Siemens AG, Alstom SA and Bombardier Inc.

Companies cooperating with local firms have sold subway cars to China, including units with the advanced automatic driving system that allows the trains to be operated without a driver.

About 4,500 metro cars with internationally advanced technology are now in use.

Leading companies will show off the latest technologies and products at Metro China 2007, to be held at Shanghai New International Expo Center from June 12 to June 14.

Domestic technologies have progressed rapidly in recent years and Chinese manufacturers are capable of completing up to 70 percent of the components in a metro car.

Leading domestic subway-car makers include Shanghai Rail Traffic Equipment Development Co, China South Locomotive & Rolling Stock Industry (Group) Corp and China Northern Locomotive & Rolling Stock Industry (Group) Corp.

"With increasing experience, the cost of metro projects has largely dropped," Zhou said.

When Shanghai and Guangzhou each built their first metro line in 2000, the cost was 700 million yuan per kilometer, compared with 500 million yuan per kilometer now, he said.

The price of a large subway car is now eight million yuan to nine million yuan, a drop from 12 million yuan years ago, he added.

The price of small cars is about 5.5 million yuan to six million yuan now.

"Fund raising could be a future bottleneck for the development of the nation's metro lines," Zhou said.

Most of the funds will be channeled from local governments. No private investors are willing to pour money into projects that usually generates losses, he said.

"In the early days, the German government offered small loans to support the first metro line in Shanghai and Guangzhou in exchange for purchasing their metro equipment, which is usually more expensive than the global average," Zhou said.

"It added to our costs, but now we fund the projects on our own."

Twenty-one metro lines now operate in 10 cities including Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Changchun, Dalian, Chongqing and Nanjing. The total length of subway lines in use was 585.83 kilometers at the end of last year.

Shanghai ranked No. 1 with 145 kilometers of subway tracks in operation, followed by Guangzhou with 116km, Beijing with 114km and Tianjin with 77.3 kilometers, the committee said.

Shanghai will add another 65 kilometers of track this year and Beijing will add more than 30 kilometers.

"China is building the world's biggest metro system as much of the population is being diverted to the outskirts of metropolises. It's creating demand for fast transport links from the suburbs to downtown," Zhou said.

Shanghai plans to complete 12 urban rail lines with a total length of more than 500 kilometers by 2010, said Gu Weihua, vice president of Shanghai Shentong Metro Group Co, a government-backed builder and operator of subways.

Total investment on the 12 lines will be about 200 billion yuan.

The city also plans to construct another 780 kilometers in 20 to 30 years.

Between 1.8 million and two million passengers use the metro in Shanghai and Beijing each day.

"Metro passengers in Shanghai now account for 15 percent of all public transport users," Gu said. "The percentage will rise to 45 to 50 percent in the future."

China's first metro line was in Beijing in 1969.
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Old June 15th, 2007, 04:30 PM   #364
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This is such a great news GO GO GO CHINAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old September 26th, 2007, 07:53 AM   #365
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Subways 'Require Careful Thought'
24 September 2007
China Daily

A senior construction official urged cities building subways to be more careful and those planning subways not to rush.

"The current development scale and speed of China's rail transport is unprecedented," Huang Wei, vice-minister of construction, said at an international seminar for construction and safety of rail transport on Saturday.

Since the construction of the Beijing subway line 1 in 1965, 10 domestic cities had developed their own subway systems by the end of last year.

Currently, there are 21 lines in operation, with a total length of 581 km and capable of transporting 1.8 billion people a year, Huang said.

The coming 10 years, Huang said, will be a crucial time for the country's rail transport development.

Besides Beijing and Shanghai, which are still in the middle of a rapid expansion of their subway systems, another six cities - Shenyang, Harbin, Hangzhou, Suzhou, Chengdu and Xi'an, have gained approval to start their own subway projects.

Sixty-one lines with a total length of 1,700 km are under construction, Huang said.

"We expect to see a backbone subway system coming into being by then," he said.

"And with the fast urbanization, another 20 cities might be able to develop their own subways in 10 years," he said.

The relentless growth has spawned some potential hazards like the lack of experienced engineers rushing to meet deadlines irrespective of quality and safety measures.

"In addition, subways are top targets for human sabotage and even terrorists attacks, which means they require high safety standards," Huang said.

He urged cities to strengthen their quality control and safety measures and also map out emergency response plans.

Huang warned cities should not blindly pursue the building of subways.

"We should bear in mind the relationship between 'necessity' and 'possibility'," he said.

Construction of subways in cities should be in accordance with such factors as social development, economic affordability, environment and land supply, he said.

"We should promote the use of public transport, but not necessarily a subway, which costs billions and even more for maintenance," Huang said.

He also criticized some cities' unwise planning of subways which fail to achieve maximum social or economic gains.

"The subway is designed to relieve traffic pressure of the central areas first," he said, "however, the density of most of the planning of domestic subways at central areas is only half that of foreign countries, " Huang said.

Sui Zhenjiang, director of the Beijing municipal construction committee, said construction of another six subway lines in Beijing would start in the next few months.

Beijing has four rail lines with a total length of 114 km.
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Old November 1st, 2007, 04:37 AM   #366
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Shanghai leads a transit boom in China
Three dozen cities building rail systems; Shanghai's likely to be world's largest
Political, financial, environmental pressures that plague projects in the West don't exist

Mitchell Landsberg. Los Angeles Times
26 August 2007
The Seattle Times

SHANGHAI, China -- In 1990, Shanghai was a poor, decaying postcolonial metropolis shaking off decades of economic stagnation. Its streets were congested, too -- with bicycles.

But Shanghai decided to build a subway system, and today, the city is on its way to owning the largest urban rail mass-transit system in the world.

You can't walk very far in a straight line in Shanghai these days without coming across construction of a new subway line or station. Already, Shanghai has opened five subway lines and 95 stations serving 2 million people a day. As many as six more lines are scheduled to open in the coming years. Sometime in the next decade, Shanghai's subway system probably will surpass the world's largest and busiest systems, those in New York, Moscow and Tokyo.

In fact, transit experts say, only one thing short of disaster could prevent Shanghai from having the world's largest subway system: the very real possibility that another Chinese city -- Guangzhou, Beijing or Chongqing -- could build an even larger one.

In all, 36 Chinese cities are building rail-based public-transit systems, said Zhang Jianwei, president of Bombardier China, the Chinese arm of the Canadian company that has supplied rail cars to Chinese cities.

What explains this frenzy of infrastructural one-upmanship?

China's economy is booming. Its people are moving from the countryside into cities as part of the greatest human migration in history. Car ownership is growing explosively. And the government has decided that it needs to do something about congestion before its busiest cities grind to a standstill.

China seems little hindered by the pressures that plague transit projects in the West.

For example, financial woes sandbagged New York's Second Avenue subway for about 80 years until ground was broken this spring. In Los Angeles, the subway system has been constricted by environmental, political and financial pressures.

In China, labor is cheap, the land belongs to the government, air pollution is the primary environmental concern, and political pressure moves largely in one direction -- from the Communist Party leadership on down.

"If the government wants to do something, even if the conditions are not ready for it, it will be done," said Zheng Shiling, a Chinese architect who teaches at Tongji University in Shanghai.

The system essentially works like this: Planners draw subway lines on a map. Party officials approve them. Construction begins. If anything is in the way, it is moved.

If they need to, Chinese planners "just move 10,000 people out of the way," said Lee Schipper, a transport planner who has worked with several Chinese cities as director of research for EMBARQ, a Washington-based transportation think tank. "They don't have hearings."

Schipper recalled consulting with one Chinese metropolis whose ancient city wall stood in the way of a transportation project.

"One of the members of the People's Committee said, 'Oh, I know how we'll solve the problem. We'll move the historic wall.' "

It was, Schipper said, as if a planner in Washington proposed moving the Potomac River to make way for construction.

Yu Jifong understands all this from personal experience.

For 25 years, the Shanghai native lived in an apartment that sat on the site of a future subway station, part of what will be Shanghai's 10th subway line.

Not long ago, Yu got a notice that she would have to move. In July, she settled into a new apartment miles away, in a development housing the more than 1,100 families displaced by Line 10. Many others accepted compensation that would help them buy apartments elsewhere.

What is striking in Shanghai is how few people seem to mind this upheaval, in part because the city has dramatically improved the compensation it provides to dislocated people and businesses, and in part because residents accept the idea that the subway represents the greater good for the city.

Yu, who is unemployed, was overjoyed by the opportunity to move from the slum tenement where she had lived with seven other family members in a 300-square-foot apartment. The city provided three new apartments for the family, including the spotless 700-square-foot, two-bedroom apartment she now shares with her son, her father and three generations of the Shih Tzu dogs she raises. The apartment is legally hers, although she had to promise not to sell it for five years.

Xu Dao Fang, an engineering consultant with the Shanghai Transportation Association who helped design the city's subway system, said he encounters envy when he talks to transportation planners elsewhere who must appease opposing forces before forging ahead.

In the United States, he said, "you cannot neglect the opinions of all the various parties. Here, it's a lot easier because the system is more centered."

With a population of more than 20 million people, and more arriving every day, Shanghai is an urban planner's dream and nightmare.

Its streets strike a visitor as a free-for-all, a mad crush of people and bicycles and motorcycles and cars, all swooping in and out, sometimes at breakneck speeds, seemingly missing each other by millimeters, except when they don't.

The amazing thing is that, generally speaking, it all works.

It won't work forever, though, as cars replace bicycles and the population continues to increase. The city is banking on the subway system to serve as a pressure valve for congestion. Some planners warn that it won't accomplish that goal if Shanghai doesn't take other steps to reduce the number of cars heading into the city center every day.

At the moment, Shanghai's five subway lines, if laid end to end, would run about 80 miles. By the end of this year, that figure should be 125 miles; by 2010, when a world exposition will be held in Shanghai, it is expected to double to about 250 miles, with five or six more lines opening.

Plans call for a system that, by about 2020, would resemble a spaghetti bowl, with 22 lines and hundreds of stations. The system would stretch about 560 miles and serve more than 12 million people a day.

At the moment, no subway system in the world comes close to that.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 06:41 PM   #367
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Beijing public transport commuters outnumber car commuters for first time

BEIJING, Oct. 31 (Xinhua) -- Beijing commuters using public transport now outnumber those using private cars, according to the Beijing Municipal Committee of Communications.

The latest figures from the committee on Wednesday show 34.5 percent of the city's commuters now choose public transport, beating for the first time since figures were first recorded in 2001/2 the number of people opting for private vehicles, which made up 32 percent of the total.

The increase comes in the wake of the city government's decision to spend one billion yuan (about 1.33 million U.S. dollars) a year slashing subway and bus fares. Subway fares have been cut by 30 percent.

Since Oct. 7, when the price cut took effect, the daily average of the city's subway passenger volume has reached 2.48 million, up 910,000 from the daily average of the previous nine months this year, according to the figures.

About half of the increased traffic was due to the No. 5 subway line, which was opened to commuters also on Oct. 7.

The other half came from the four existing lines. Each of them posted 33 to 50 percent increases in their passenger volumes, compared with the figures in the first nine months of the year.

In 2005 a total of 28.1 percent of commuters made their journeys to work by public transport. This had risen to 30.2 per cent in April this year.

Currently, Beijing has five subway lines in operation, with a total length of 142 kilometers. The city will have nine lines totaling 200 km by 2008, and 19 lines totaling 561.5 km by 2020.

Beijing, a city with a population of 17 million and more than 3 million registered vehicles, has been trying to boost public transit to ease traffic pressure and improve air quality ahead of the 2008 Olympics.

The capital has staged a slew of measures, including improving public transport structure, slashing bus fares by 60 percent for residents since the beginning of this year and imposing temporary car bans.

The city's public transport system now carries 15 million commuters every day, and the number is expected to rise to 28 million people in 2012. The city aims to raise the proportion of people commuting on public transit to 50 percent by then.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 06:50 PM   #368
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China?!? How about us, for crying out loud?
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 06:56 PM   #369
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China?!? How about US, for crying out loud?
Well, US used to have the biggest Public Transport System in the world before the Interstate Highways came out. Now, we definitely in "DIRE NEED" of it again.
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Last edited by Gaeus; November 18th, 2007 at 07:22 PM.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 07:26 PM   #370
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Don't think China can afford to make that mistake by turning towards the highway.
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 01:50 PM   #371
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Don't think China can afford to make that mistake by turning towards the highway.
Absolutely!

Quote:
Beijing has four rail lines with a total length of 114 km.
Wow. I was there only in May and then it had 3 lines.
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 02:03 PM   #372
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Isn't China boosting its public transport already by expanding subways at an amazing rate?

The World Bank should tell those other countries which rely too much on cars, to boost public transport. And not transfer the burden of global warming to developing countries like China and India which are doing their utmost to expand their public transportation systems.
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 04:57 PM   #373
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Isn't China boosting its public transport already by expanding subways at an amazing rate?

The World Bank should tell those other countries which rely too much on cars, to boost public transport. And not transfer the burden of global warming to developing countries like China and India which are doing their utmost to expand their public transportation systems.
China has been going through a huge subway construction boom, but with the economy overheating, the government tried to curb the pace of construction, but nevertheless there is a great desire for mass transit in large cities.
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Old November 10th, 2007, 11:57 AM   #374
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Most shun 'slow' public transport
9 November 2007
South China Morning Post

Fewer than one in 10 mainlanders use public transport as their main way of getting around, a figure analysts say is far too low given the pressing environmental and social needs.

Lan Rong , head of the Ministry of Construction's transport department, said public transport in urban areas accounted for less than 10 per cent of total traffic on average - far below the 40 to 60 per cent in Japan, western Europe and some South American countries.

The traditional means of transport - bicycles and walking - still dominate, but the mainland has seen private car ownership soar along with its economic boom, changing urban residents' transport patterns.

In Nanjing , 66 per cent of people travel by bicycle or on foot and 19.3 per cent use public transport. People driving their own cars, practically zero 10 years ago, accounts for 4.31 per cent - almost twice the proportion of the population that relies primarily on the subway.

Qiu Baoxing , the vice-minister of construction, has warned that private cars are taking up too much space on the road, and traffic in some cities will be paralysed if public transport does not improve.

But ministry figures show that 70 per cent of people are dissatisfied with public transport services. In congested city streets it is often quicker to get around by bicycle.

The ministry has pledged to give priority to promoting public transport and to make it account for 30 per cent of traffic in urban areas within five years. In big cities such as Beijing, bus speeds should be raised to more than 20km/h and public transport should account for 42 per cent of all traffic by 2010.

Shi Jing, an associate professor at Tsinghua University's Institute of Transportation Engineering, said public transport was crucial for big cities because it could help control pollution, cure traffic congestion and transport large numbers of people.

"In big cities it would be ideal to have public transport taking 80 per cent to 90 per cent of traffic."
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Old November 13th, 2007, 03:13 PM   #375
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Mass transit appeal
Beijing's operation light-years ahead of CTA

The Chicago Sun-Times
10 November 2007

I've eaten leisurely lunches and flipped through telephone-book size fashion magazines waiting for CTA trains, craning my neck into the dark abyss so many times I thought I'd need a brace.

But when I went to China for 10 days two weeks ago, the longest I had to wait for a train on Beijing's sleek subway system was one minute. And it cost only a quarter.

Beijing's rapid mass transit first began operating in 1969, so it's much newer than our system, parts of which are more than 100 years old. It only zips through 88 miles of track compared to the CTA's 222. It's understandable that the Chinese trains would be cleaner and faster.

Still, that's no excuse for the desperate state of the CTA today. While Beijing aims for mass transit nirvana, our trains hobble along like the rickety overnight post-colonial clunkers I've ridden in India -- China's economic rival and neighbor.

My metro rides to Tiananmen Square and Silk Street market were so quick that the subway's efficiency became a jolting reminder of what we lack in Chicago. As Beijing's trains whisked me through stops I can't even begin to pronounce, I grew increasingly bitter thinking about the now averted doomsday scenario back home and our politicians' reluctance to quickly hammer out a permanent financial solution for the CTA.

The recent $27 million Band-Aid was a welcoming gesture. But the last-minute save is a whisper compared to the booming sense of urgency and long-term commitment to public transit I sensed overseas.

Between 2006 and 2010, Beijing is expected to shell out $9.14 billion for public transportation, the bulk going toward the expansion of the rail lines that would make the system 350 miles long. Before, the most a rider paid for a train ride was 5 yuan (roughly 70 cents). But then the government, eager to reduce the number of drivers in the heavily polluted and congested Beijing, last month implemented a flat one-way fare of two yuan (25 cents) on all routes, encouraging more public transit riders.

Bus fares are even lower. I found out the hard way, watching commuters giggle at me as I shoved two yuans into the automated fare box. I laughed, too.

What's not funny is that the CTA keeps struggling to keep from cutting bus routes and maintain affordable fares for a system that lags technologically behind other international metros.

"Public transportation is a social welfare," Beijing official Liu Xiao-ming once said. Too bad some of our elected leaders, and many who rarely board the CTA, think otherwise.

Beijing, no doubt, is motivated to make a good impression for the 2008 Summer Olympics and can count on revenues from the massive international spectacle to cover some public improvement costs.

We won't know until 2009 whether we'll get a chance to host the 2016 Olympics. But it shouldn't matter. A fast urban public transportation system is key to a city's survival and reflects on its eagerness to provide convenience for all at all times.

Even New Delhi -- the 2010 Commonwealth Games host -- is expanding routes on its fairly new metro system. If the Indian capital, with roads practically paved with cows and rickshaws, is hopping on board, why do we keep missing the bus?

We may not have to worry about monkeys jumping on the trains and scaring commuters as they did last year in New Delhi; we've got an even bigger monkey on our backs.

Rummana Hussain is a Sun-Times editorial board writer. This column represents her views and not necessarily the views of the board.
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Old November 13th, 2007, 10:58 PM   #376
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Well, US to have the biggest Public Transport System in the world before the Interstate Highways came out. Now, we definitely in "DIRE NEED" of it again.
We've built in such a way that there's not a "dire need" for transit -- which in itself is a dire problem. The WB is urging China to build transit before auto-dependent land use takes effect, and it's a difficult fight. I've visited a number of Chinese cities (from big ones like Beijing to small ones like Hanzhong), and they're often being urban-renewed into modernist nightmares: barren streetfronts, barren walls, separation of uses, basically everything the US is learning the hard way through consistent failure. The most populous nation on earth, being built to be as inhospitable for people as possible.
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Old November 14th, 2007, 10:32 PM   #377
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I think a lot of it is that Chinese cities are growing fast in population, and trying to rebuild or freshly build all of their infrastructure RIGHT NOW.

It's going to be mass chaos for awhile until the country can get it's feet back underneath itself.
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Old November 15th, 2007, 04:21 AM   #378
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I think a lot of it is that Chinese cities are growing fast in population, and trying to rebuild or freshly build all of their infrastructure RIGHT NOW.
I understand that, and the infrastructure improvements are laudable.

My gripe is with the architecture and urban planning -- they're building some very alienating neighborhoods. Separation of uses in China of all places! What a wasted opportunity.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 05:02 PM   #379
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Daily passenger flow of Beijing subway reaches record high

BEIJING, Nov. 18 (Xinhua) -- The Beijing subway network saw record 2.89 million passengers on Nov. 16, after a new subway line was opened and subway fare was slashed.

The No.13 rail line received 382,900 passengers on Nov. 16, recording a new high.

The south-north No.5 subway line received 472,600 passengers on the same day, the second high since it was put into operation on Oct. 7.

The new 27.6-km line, after nearly five years' construction, has 23 stations and runs from Tiantongyuan North Station in northern Beijing's Changping District to Songjiazhuang Station in southern Fengtai District.

Also on Oct. 7, a new subway pricing system was adopted, cutting subway fares by about 30 percent. Now a one-way ticket costs just two yuan (27 U.S. cents), nearly the price of a small bottled water, no matter how long one travels.

A subway company official said on Sunday that since the subway fare was slashed and the new No.5 subway line opened, the number of subway passengers had kept rising. And every Friday normally saw the largest number of passengers compared with other weekdays.

The official thus called for passengers to go to work earlier and come back home later than usual, so as to avoid transport peak.

Beijing currently has five subway lines in operation, with a total length of 142 km.

Beijing's urban planning authorities have approved the building of six more subway lines. The No.6, 8 and 9 lines, the second phase of No.10 line, and the Yizhuang and Daxing lines, have a total length of 152 km, according to the Beijing Municipal Commission of Urban Planning. They will be completed by 2012.
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Old March 8th, 2008, 01:38 PM   #380
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CHINA | Urban Rail Transit Compilation

Hey, I would like to start a thread about the Urban Rail Transit in China (Mainland, HK & Taiwan). Have a wonderful day!

Operating: (From North to South)
Changchun, Dalian, Beijing, Tianjin, Nanjing, Shanghai, Wuhan, Chongqing, Taipei, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Hong Kong.

U/C & Planning: Harbin, Shengyang, Qingdao, Wuxi, Hangzhou, Ningbo, Lanzhou, Xi'an, Chengdu, Kunming

This complilation will be updated in a time manner, you are more than welcome to do that by posting news, maps, etc. but please quote your citations if there's any. Most of the materials that I put here is from the internet research, therefore the source links and citations are offered in the meantime.

Urban rail transit is a great creation to cope with the worsen urban traffic jam and population growth. I am glad to see that China with the biggest population in the world and the rapid increasing rate of private car ownership is paying more attention on the public transit. This is a big contribution to the global sustainable development.
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Last edited by ChinaboyUSA; March 9th, 2008 at 09:54 AM.
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