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Old March 28th, 2008, 04:52 AM   #421
Andrew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taipei Walker View Post
People usually refer to Taiwan as "Chinese" (for example Chinese Taipei) but term "China" is reserved for PRC. The title of the thread is "China Urban Rail", I think it is not appropriate to put Taiwan in this compilation.

I wouldn't argue if the title is "Chinese Urban Rail..."
Why is Taiwan called the Republic of China then? That's how it's officially known.
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Old March 28th, 2008, 06:32 AM   #422
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
no, by Italian one
by the common use.
So "the common use" "reserved" the name "China" to mainland China? Sounds funny. Anyway I never heard of such Bull****.
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Old March 28th, 2008, 06:06 PM   #423
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Some companies, publishers, and organizations use the term Greater China to encompass the mainland, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan without alluding to their political situations. It's a sensitive issue and there's probably no point in arguing about it here. Perhaps that would be a better title for the thread. All four territories have made some wonderful urban rail progress in recent years, and it would be great to discuss that without letting the politics of the region get in the way.
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Old March 29th, 2008, 08:21 AM   #424
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It seems to me that China's subway rolling stocks seem to be subjected to "seasons". Like the original Guangzhou metro and Shanghai L1 and L2 stock are the same, then came the Alstom Metropolis which is sprouting all over China now.
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Old March 30th, 2008, 04:11 PM   #425
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew View Post
Why is Taiwan called the Republic of China then? That's how it's officially known.
When Mao Zedong overthrew the Nationalist government of China, ending the Chinese Civil War, the Nationalists fled to Taiwan and continued to regard themselves as the legitimate government of all China. This is why Taiwan calls itself the Republic of China and has never declared itself independent from China. Both sides regard Taiwan as an integral part of China, and the (Communist) Chinese government has in the past threatened to invade Taiwan if it declares independence.

The Wikipedia article on Taiwan independence says:
Quote:
The official position of the People's Republic of China is that Taiwan is a province of China, and has "always" been part of China. The PRC has repeatedly threatened to invade if Taiwan ever declares formal independence, and has sought to intimidate voters in Taiwan through activities such as test-firing missiles across Taiwan's northern coast when elections are due (notably just before the 1996 elections) and when subjects such as constitutional reform are being discussed. The PRC often claims independence is wanted by only a small group, and that this group is trying to brainwash the local population to support this objective. In the 2000 White Paper, the Chinese government stated that the people of Taiwan do not have the right to determine their own fate by declaring independence through a referendum or otherwise because "The sovereignty over Taiwan belongs to all the Chinese people including Taiwan compatriots, and not to some of the people in Taiwan." The paper further stated that unification with mainland China is the only option.

In Taiwan itself, the situation is much more complicated, and China's actions have often added to that complexity. Support has grown for the cause of total separation from China - but this does not always translate into support for formal independence, which still represents a minority within which there are factions advocating several different, often incompatible approaches.

The Pan-Blue Coalition and the People's Republic of China believe that Lee Teng-hui and Chen Shui-bian are intent on publicly promoting a moderate form of Taiwan independence in order to advance secretly deeper forms of Taiwan independence, and that they intend to use popular support on Taiwan for political separation to advance notions of cultural and economic separation.

Most Taiwanese of all political parties support the status quo, and recognize that this is de facto independence through sovereign self-rule. Even among those who believe Taiwan is and should remain independent, the threat of war from China softens their approach, and they tend to support maintaining the status quo rather than pursuing an idealogical path that could result in war with the PRC. When the two-states policy was put forward by President Lee Teng-hui, he received 80 percent support. A similar situation arose when President Chen Shui-bian declared that there was "one country on each side" of the Taiwan Strait. The parties disagree, sometimes bitterly, on such things as territory, name (R.O.C. or Taiwan), future policies, and interpretations of history.
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Old March 31st, 2008, 12:50 PM   #426
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Exactly, so surely until Taiwan actually decides to declare indipendance people can't complain if they're put in the same thread as China.
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Old March 31st, 2008, 03:21 PM   #427
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HELOO.

Can you people not talk about politics?

Why does politics become an issue when an international discussion in something Chinese comes up, especially in rail issues. Eg, Shanghai Metro thread.

Please, please get back on topic.
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Old April 27th, 2008, 07:59 AM   #428
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where is hong kong & shenzhen?

Last edited by peacedot; April 27th, 2008 at 08:39 AM.
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Old April 27th, 2008, 10:01 AM   #429
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On the south coast of China. Duh! :P
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Old April 28th, 2008, 01:54 PM   #430
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I was in Hangzhou on the weekend and I noticed the metro construction near the railway station. Does anyone have a map of the metro for Hangzhou? The traffic there is horrific, especially around the West Lake. I hope the new metro will reduce some of the traffic.
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Old April 28th, 2008, 05:51 PM   #431
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Really like how they've integrated above ground rail into urban areas.
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You are genius too Electrify, never would have thought of this if not for your thread.
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Old April 29th, 2008, 03:17 AM   #432
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Hangzhou is like Hartford to Shanghai!
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Old April 29th, 2008, 03:33 AM   #433
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peacedot View Post
Hangzhou is like Hartford to Shanghai!
?!?! not at all! Hangzhou is much more like Philadelphia to Shanghai. Nanjing is like Boston to Shanghai. Hartford would probably be Wuxi, Changzhou, etc. one of those small cities between Shanghai and Nanjing
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Old April 29th, 2008, 04:04 AM   #434
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peacedot View Post
Hangzhou is like Hartford to Shanghai!
Do you mean "Hangzhou is to Shanghai" as "Hartford is to New York City" ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
?!?! not at all! Hangzhou is much more like Philadelphia to Shanghai. Nanjing is like Boston to Shanghai. Hartford would probably be Wuxi, Changzhou, etc. one of those small cities between Shanghai and Nanjing
And again,

Compared to New York City, Hangzhou is much more like Philadelphia, when compared to Shanghai ... or have I got the whole story wrong?

In English, when you compare things ("is like"), you compare one against the other ... I've only guessed that the equivalent of Shanghai is NYC here; I may be wrong.

And ... are we talking about size here, or character and appearance: the parks or skylines of these cities, or the spirit of their people?
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Old April 29th, 2008, 04:16 AM   #435
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
Do you mean "Hangzhou is to Shanghai" as "Hartford is to New York City" ?



And again,

Compared to New York City, Hangzhou is much more like Philadelphia, when compared to Shanghai ... or have I got the whole story wrong?

In English, when you compare things ("is like"), you compare one against the other ... I've only guessed that the equivalent of Shanghai is NYC here; I may be wrong.

And ... are we talking about size here, or character and appearance: the parks or skylines of these cities, or the spirit of their people?
Yeah youre right. Excuse my lazy native english grammar. Here's the comparison in diagram or SAT analogy form:

Shanghai:Hangzhou :: New York:Philadelphia
Shanghai:Nanjing :: New York:Boston

I mean I guess its geographical position, and relative size of cities (although I am aware that Boston is smaller than Philly even though Hangzhou is smaller than Nanjing). Geographical position is interesting. Hangzhou is almost the exact same distance from Shanghai as Philly is from New York. Nanjing is also roughly the same distance from Shanghai as Boston is from New York. Spirit of the people too I guess relatively. Hangzhou is more laid back than Shanghai and less crowded, but a huge city nevertheless. It is home to Zhejiang University, which corresponds pretty closely to U Penn in rankings and prestige (not internationally, but in local rankings). Hangzhou also served as the capital, and was the greatest city in China at one point like how Philly was once the greatest city in America. Nanjing is much older and has a very strong historical and intellectual importance similar to Boston (although less of a college town).
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Old April 30th, 2008, 08:49 AM   #436
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Hartford is the capital of CT, which is the richest state in the US in term of Per Capita income. Hangzhou is the capital of Zhejiang, very similar.
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Old April 30th, 2008, 05:53 PM   #437
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Hartford is the capital of CT, which is the richest state in the US in term of Per Capita income. Hangzhou is the capital of Zhejiang, very similar.
Yeah, but Connecticut is a very suburbanized small state with only 3.4 million people and Hartford is tiny by Chinese standards, with only 1.2 million people in the entire metropolitan area compared with Hangzhou which has 3 million in the city and over 6 million in the metropolitan area. Hangzhou is also getting its own subway system that will total 278 km when completed. Comparing Hangzhou to Hartford is like comparing New York City to Tel Aviv.
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Old April 30th, 2008, 08:19 PM   #438
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
Yeah youre right. Excuse my lazy native english grammar. Here's the comparison in diagram or SAT analogy form:

Shanghai:Hangzhou :: New York:Philadelphia
Shanghai:Nanjing :: New York:Boston

I mean I guess its geographical position, and relative size of cities (although I am aware that Boston is smaller than Philly even though Hangzhou is smaller than Nanjing). Geographical position is interesting. Hangzhou is almost the exact same distance from Shanghai as Philly is from New York. Nanjing is also roughly the same distance from Shanghai as Boston is from New York. Spirit of the people too I guess relatively. Hangzhou is more laid back than Shanghai and less crowded, but a huge city nevertheless. It is home to Zhejiang University, which corresponds pretty closely to U Penn in rankings and prestige (not internationally, but in local rankings). Hangzhou also served as the capital, and was the greatest city in China at one point like how Philly was once the greatest city in America. Nanjing is much older and has a very strong historical and intellectual importance similar to Boston (although less of a college town).
I buy into this from a distinctly southern perspective
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Old May 19th, 2008, 06:23 PM   #439
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Fuzhou, the Capital of Fujian Province, next to the Taiwan Strait, will join to the metro cities of China. The first metroline will be open 2014.

Fuzhou, the first subway will be completed in 2014

Here whole this news, translated from Chinese to English by Google Translator:

"《福州市城市快速轨道交通建设规划》日前通过评审,福州轨道交通线网将由7条轨道交通线路组成,全长约180公里,1号线将于2014年建成通车。 "Fuzhou city rapid rail transit construction plan," recently passed accreditation, Fuzhou rail transit network will be seven rail transit lines formed, is about 180 kilometers, Line 1 will be completed in 2014 opening.

受国家发改委委托,中国国际咨询公司近日在榕召开《福州市城市快速轨道交通建设规划》评估会,与会专家认为,福州已具备建设城市快速轨道的基本条件。 Commissioned by the National Development and Reform Commission, China's international consulting firm, recently-jung held a "fast-track traffic in Fuzhou city construction plan" will be assessed, the participating experts believe that Fuzhou city has a fast-track construction of the basic conditions.

按照规划,福州市轨道交通线网在主城区将形成“有环放射式”结构。 According to the plan, Fuzhou city rail transit network in the main urban areas will form a "ring-radiation" structure. 线网由7条轨道交通线路组成,全长约180公里,共设站134个,其中换乘站16个,中心城区线网密度达0.62公里/平方公里。 Line network by seven rail transit lines formed, is about 180 kilometers, a total of 134 points, including 16 transfer stations, the Centre City line density of 0.62 km / sq km.

结合福州实际情况,拟在近期至2018年间建设1号线和2号线,其中1号线长28.8公里,计划2014年建成通车;2号线长26.5公里,计划2018年前建成通车,形成城市快速轨道交通十字形构架骨架网。 Fuzhou, with the actual situation, to be in the near future to the 2018 intergovernmental Line No. 1 and Line 2, Line 1 of 28.8 kilometers, the planned 2014 completion of the opening; Line 2 of 26.5 kilometers, the plan completed before 2018 Opening, a city rapid rail transit network cruciform framework skeleton. 1号线和2号线安排地下线48.5公里,高架线6.8公里;共设站46个,其中地下站41个,高架站5个;还设有1座车辆基地、1处定修段、2座停车场、1座控制中心。 Line 1 and Line 2 off the assembly line for the 48.5 kilometers, 6.8 kilometers of elevated line; established a total of 46 points, including 41 underground stations, high-Jiazhan 5; vehicle also has a base, a set Xiu, the two car parks, a control center."

I will tell more as soon as I know.
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Old May 19th, 2008, 06:25 PM   #440
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Here whole news about Fuzhou MTR:

http://www.hdzxw.com/InfoShow.aspx?I...2&InfoTypeID=4

Could somebody whole understand Chinese language translate this article to English, please?

Quote:
作者:海都资讯网 文章来源:海峡都市报社 更新时间:2008-5-13 4:02:00 N本报记者 阙文龙 昆仑/制图

本报讯 福州的地铁建设有了新进展。记者昨日获悉,《福州市城市快速轨道交通建设规划》11日通过国家发改委委托的中国国际咨询公司评审,5月9日至11日在榕召开的评估会上,专家们认为,福州已具备建设城市快速轨道的基本条件。

据悉,福州市轨道交通线网由7条轨道交通线路组成,其中1号线(北连新店居住区,南接规划的铁路南站大型交通枢纽)将率先建设,力争今年内上报国家发改委审核后报国务院批准立项,明年动建,全长28.8公里,全为地下线,设站24座,计划2014年建成通车。

根据规划,1号、2号线在中心城区形成“十”字形骨架,与正在建设中的温福、福厦铁路等相交叉,适应福州主城区南北向、东西向主客流通道的交通需求以及近期发展重点地区的交通需求,不仅能缓解城区交通压力,还有利于加强福州对外交通联系。并且,如果先建1号线,拟建的火车南站和福州汽车客运南站就能与现有的福州火车站和汽车北站实现“无缝对接”,旅客可自由换乘,大大方便百姓出行。

按照规划,福州市轨道交通线网在主城区将形成“有环放射式”结构。线网由7条轨道交通线路组成,全长约180公里,共设站134座,其中换乘站16座。2号线长26.5公里,计划2018年前建成通车。

7条城市快速轨道线路走向

根据最新出炉的《福州市轨道交通规划远景图》,初步规划了7条城市快速轨道(如图)。

1号线:是线网中的南北向主干线,全长28.8公里,全为地下线,设站24座,计划2014年建成通车。其北连新店居住区、铁路福州站,经市中心,向南深入重点发展地区——南台岛,连接规划的铁路南站大型交通枢纽和东部新城,串联晋安、鼓楼、台江、仓山四区,与城市“南进”发展吻合。

2号线:是线网中东西向主干线,全长26.5公里,设站22座,地上5座,计划于1号线动工后适时启动建设,2018年前建成通车。2号线连接中心城以及被闽江、乌龙江分割的金山地区、闽侯地区,将有效缩短大学城、金山生活区、鼓山生活区与城市中心的距离。

3号线:是南北向加密线,全长27.2公里,设站22座。其从起点经福飞北路后,在福州北站与1号线换乘,后过东岭跨乌龙江。它的建设有利于加强南台岛西南部、台江商务中心与旧中心城区的联系。

4号线:西起汽车西站,沿杨桥路在东街口与1号线换乘,至前横路折向南行至闽江北岸,跨闽江后经金浦小区、仓山科技园,经规划中的东部新城至新行政中心,全长25.2公里,设站22座。将促进近期建设的东部新城会展中心地区的发展。

5号线:全长15公里,设站12座,是7条线路中最短的一条。它西起洪山桥,在金洲路与2号线换乘,起终点均与4号线相连。5号线贯穿南台岛中西部,有利于金山、建新、仓山各分区开发建设,与4号线形成环形,可减轻中心城区交通压力。

6号线:全长32.4公里,设站16座,是7条线路中最长的一条。它起于南台岛东部新城,过闽江至马尾,至下洋跨越乌龙江,经营前镇、吴航镇,穿滨海新区至长乐国际机场。它的建成,对于连接中心城区与滨海新城,发挥中心城区辐射功能,支持长乐、滨海地区建设等具有不可低估的作用。

7号线:是为滨海新城预留发展的一条线路,全长29.1公里,设站16座。它起于长乐金峰镇,经郑店、漳港镇、文武砂镇至江田镇,主要沿规划的滨海新城交通干道布设。
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Last edited by vristo; May 19th, 2008 at 07:42 PM.
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