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Old May 19th, 2008, 07:58 PM   #441
vristo
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More about Fuzhou MTR:

http://www.letfind.com.cn/news/2008-5/34401.html

Please, somebody translate...
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Old May 19th, 2008, 08:54 PM   #442
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I found the plan of Fuzhou MTR from some web forum:

http://bbs.66163.com/viewthread.php?...extra=page%3D1
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Old May 21st, 2008, 10:14 AM   #443
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Ask and you shall receive! I actually found Fuzhou relatively easy to get around when I was there this past winter, but a metro always helps.

This is the first bit; I'll translate the details about the lines later.

--

The construction of the Fuzhou subway has had a new development. Our reporter learned yesterday that the “Fuzhou Metropolitan Rapid Light Transit Construction Plan” on May 11 underwent the National Development and Reform Commission’s China-International Advisory Corporation’s appraisal. In the assessment meeting convened between May 9 and May 11, experts said that Fuzhou already possesses the basic conditions for the construction of a MRT.

According to interviews, the Fuzhou MRT network will have seven lines, of which Line 1 (which will connect to Xinzhuang Juzhuqu in the north, and reach the planned South Railway Station Transit Hub in the south) will be the first built. Officials will strive to receive verification from the National Development and Reform Commission and approval for the project from the State Council within the year, and to begin construction next year. Line 1 will be 28.8 km long and will be built entirely underground. It will have 24 stations, and is planned to open in 2014.

According to the plan, Lines 1 and 2 will form a cross-shaped framework in the center of the city, intersecting with the railroads to Wenzhou and Xiamen currently under construction. This intersection will conform to the transportation requirements of Fuzhou’s main east-west and north-south commuting thoroughfares, and to the transportation requirements of important short-term development sites. Not only will this alleviate the pressure on inner-city transportation, but it will also be beneficial to the strengthening of transit connections between Fuzhou and other cities. Furthermore, if Line 1 is built first, the planned South Railway Station and Fuzhou South Long-Distance Bus Station will have an immediate and seamless connection to the currently-existing North Railway Station and North Long-Distance Bus Station. This will enable travelers to freely transfer from one to the other, making travel much easier for common people.

According to the plan, the Fuzhou MRT network will be shaped like “a wheel with radiating spokes” in the city center. The network will consist of seven lines, with a total length of 180 km, and will possess 134 stations in all, of which 16 will be transfer stations. Line 2 will be 26.5 km long, and is planned to be built by 2018.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 06:44 PM   #444
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Thank you for your translation! Good work, much better than the Google Translator .

There is some questions in my mind about this Fuzhou's great MTR-plan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Codfish View Post
"Fuzhou Metropolitan Rapid Light Transit Construction Plan”
The Light Rail?
Like a Shanghai's metrolines 5 and 6 with shorter trains (4-cars) and platforms (80 meter) in the stations? This picture from www.urbanrail.net:


Or even like the light rail in Changchun:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?p=17782147

What do you think?
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Last edited by vristo; May 21st, 2008 at 07:08 PM.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 07:56 PM   #445
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Oops, sorry, mistranslation on my part - I misread 轨道 as 轻轨. 轨道 means any metro - the "light" shouldn't be there.

It looks like the Fuzhou MRT will be mostly a subway, at least in the city center; a few of the suburban stops may be above ground.

Here's the second part of the article, where it discusses the lines:


Line 1: The north-south axis of the network, 28.8 km, completely underground, 24 stations, planned to open in 2014. It will connect in the north to Xinzhuang Juzhuqu and the Fuzhou Railway Station, will go through the city center, and in the south will reach the important development zone of Nantaidao, connecting to the planned South Station Transit Hub and the East New City. It will link Pu’an, the Drum Tower, Taijiang, Cangshan Siqu, and the city’s “South Progress” development.

Line 2: The east-west axis of the network, 26.5 km, 22 stops, of which 5 are above ground. Planned to begin construction after the completion of Line 1, and to open before 2018. Line 2 will connect the Jinshan region and Minhou region separated by the Min and Wulong Rivers, and will reduce the effective distance between the University Town, the Jinshan Residential Area, the Gushan Residential Area, and the city center.

Line 3: North-south supplemental line (I think – the only translation I can find for 加密 is “encrypted,” which makes no sense in context), 27.2 km, 22 stops. From the starting stop of Fufei North Road, it will intersect with Line 1 at Fuzhou North Railway Station, then will pass through the Eastern Ridge and cross the Wulong River. Its construction will contribute to the strengthening of connections between the southwest part of Nantai Island, the Tai River Commerce Center, and the old city center.

Line 4: Starting in the west at the West Bus Station, it will travel along Yangqiao Road and cross Line 1 at the intersection with East Avenue. At Qianheng Road it will bend south toward the north bank of the Min River. After crossing the river, it will pass through Jinpu Xiaoqu, Cangshan Technology Park, and the planned East New City and New Executive Center. 25.2 km, 22 stations. It will promote the development of the soon-to-be-built East New City Exhibition Center District.

Line 5: 15 km, 12 stations, the shortest line of the seven. It will start in the west at Hongshan Bridge, cross Line 2 at Jinzhou Road, and end at a transfer station with Line 4. Line 5 will penetrate the central and west parts of Nantai Island, and will promote the development of Jinshan, Jianxin, and Cangshan. Together with Line 4, it will form a circle that will lessen the transportation pressure in the city center.

Line 6: 32.4 km, 16 stations, the longest of the seven lines. Starting at Xincheng in the eastern part of Nantai Island, it will cross the Min River and reach Mawei, then cross the Wulong River at Xiayang. It will then pass through Yingqian Town, Wuhang Town, and Binhai Xinqu before arriving at Changle International Airport. Its purpose will be to connect the city center to Binhai Xinqu, and expand the functions of the city center. Its ability to support the development of Changle and the Binhai region cannot be underestimated.

Line 7: Line 7 is intended to support the predicted development of the Binhai Xinqu. 29.1 km, 16 stops. Starting at Jinfeng Town in Changle, it will pass Zhengdian Town, Zhanggang Town, Wenwusha Town, and Jiangtian Town. It will mostly follow the planned construction of the transportation arteries in Binhai Xincheng.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 08:14 PM   #446
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Thank you for your great job! Now I just start to wait for the beginning of Fuzhou MTR-plans construction work. The first line 2014...

This metroplan; the Big step for the city of Fuzhou!
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 02:56 PM   #447
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"Light rail" is Chinese terminology for elevated rail, so, no LRT in neither Shanghai nor Fuzhou.
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 07:55 PM   #448
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Ranking of Chinese urban rail systems, posted by kimi-win.


6月份大中華城市專區將按城市軌道交通系統 (輕軌 / 地鐵 / 捷運) 總長度排名,

請各版友提供、補充、更正資料(需提供資料來源連結):

上海 營運長度234公里 / 興建中206.9公里 / 規劃總長970公里
香港 營運長度211.6公里 / 興建中14.8公里 / 規劃總長度(巳承諾)271.6公里
北京 營運長度142公里 / 興建中56公里 / 規劃總長度1,053公里
廣州 營運長度116公里 / 興建中84公里 / 規劃總長度600公里
台北 營運長度74.4公里 / 興建中79.7公里 / 規劃總長度270公里
大連 營運長度49.15公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度(資料不詳)公里
高雄 營運長度42.7公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度136.55公里
天津 營運長度26.2公里 / 興建中103.8公里 / 規劃總長度227公里
深圳 營運長度21.87公里/興建中113.57公里 / 規劃總長度585.34公里
南京 營運長度21.72公里 / 興建中52.49公里 / 規劃總長度433公里
重慶 營運長度19.15公里 / 興建中57.08公里 / 規劃總長度300公里
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
武漢 營運長度0公里 / 興建中70公里 / 規劃總長度220公里
蘇州 營運長度0公里 / 興建中52.74公里 / 規劃總長度135.5公里
杭州 營運長度0公里 / 興建中47.97公里 / 規劃總長度68.79公里
鄭州 營運長度0公里 / 興建中(即將興建)45.39公里 / 規劃總長度202.53公里
瀋陽 營運長度0公里 / 興建中40.85公里 / 規劃總長度182.5公里
成都 營運長度0公里 / 興建中31.6公里 / 規劃總長度274.15公里
西安 營運長度0公里 / 興建中26.4公里 / 規劃總長度215.77公里
澳門 營運長度0公里 / 興建中(即將興建)20公里 / 規劃總長度22公里
哈爾濱 營運長度0公里 / 興建中(即將興建)14.3公里 / 規劃總長度143公里
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
東莞 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度264.2公里
長沙 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度200.2公里
福州 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度180公里
無錫 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度157.77公里
石家莊 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度150公里
常州 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度129公里
青島 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度128公里
合肥 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度120公里
台中 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度69.3公里
桃園 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度48.6公里
新竹 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度26公里
台南 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度24.8公里
基隆 營運長度0公里 / 興建中0公里 / 規劃總長度23.78公里


Translation

Shanghai: 234km (operational); 206.9km (under construction); 970km (total length planned)
Hong Kong: 211.6km (operational); 14.8km (under construction); 271.6km (total length planned)
Beijing: 142km (operational); 56km (under construction); 1053km (total length planned)
Guangzhou: 116km (operational); 84km (under construction); 600km (total length planned)
Taipei: 74.4km (operational); 79.7km (under construction); 270km (total length planned)
Dalian: 49.15km (operational); 0km (under construction); Unknown (total length planned)
Kaohsiung: 42.7km (operational); 0km (under construction); 136.55 (total length planned)
Tianjin: 26.2km (operational); 103.8km (under construction); 227km (total length planned)
Shenzhen: 21.87km (operational); 113.57km (under construction); 585.34km (total length planned)
Nanjing: 21.72km (operational); 52.49km (under construction); 433km (total length planned)
Chongqing: 19.25km (operational); 57.08km (under construction); 300km (total length planned)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wuhan: 0km (operational); 70km (under construction); 220km (total length planned)
Suzhou: 0km (operational); 52.74km (under construction); 135.5km (total length planned)
Hangzhou: 0km (operational); 47.97km (under construction); 68.79km (total length planned)
Zhengzhou: 0km (operational); 45.39km (under construction); 202.53km (total length planned)
Shenyang: 0km (operational); 40.85km (under construction); 182.5km (total length planned)
Chengdu: 0km (operational); 31.6km (under construction); 274.15km (total length planned)
Xi'an: 0km (operational); 26.4km (under construction); 215.77km (total length planned)
Macau: 0km (operational); 20km (under construction); 22km (total length planned)
Harbin: 0km (operational); 14.3km (under construction); 143km (total length planned)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dongguan: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 264.2km (total length planned)
Changsha: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 200.2km (total length planned)
Fuzhou: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 180km (total length planned)
Wuxi: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 157.77km (total length planned)
Shijiazhuang: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 150km (total length planned)
Changzhou: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 129km (total length planned)
Qingdao: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 128km (total length planned)
Hefei: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 120km (total length planned)
Taichung: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 69.3km (total length planned)
Taoyuan: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 48.6km (total length planned)
Hsinchu : 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 26km (total length planned)
Tainan: 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 24.8km (total length planned)
Keelung : 0km (operational); 0km (under construction); 23.78km (total length planned)

Some figures are very outdated though, especially long term plans. For example Shenyang is planning 400km and Chongqing above 500km.
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Old May 23rd, 2008, 08:48 PM   #449
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staff View Post
"Light rail" is Chinese terminology for elevated rail, so, no LRT in neither Shanghai nor Fuzhou.
I am sorry, but I know this thing and in this case Shanghai's metroline 5 is "the light rail"; 17.2 km, 11 stations and all elevated (just look at the picture. Also Shanghai's metroline 6 meets the same requirements as line 5 as well. But 12.1 km from the totall 17.2 km (with 17 stations) the Shangahai's metroline 6 is evevated.

Of course, in Europe we understand words "light rail" a little bit different.
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Old May 24th, 2008, 02:13 AM   #450
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Also, though Chinese elevated lines are usually referred to as light rail, this is not necessarily true. Here in Beijing, Line 13 is completely above ground, yet it is usually called "地铁13号线" (Subway Line 13), or occasionally "城铁" (City Rail). I've never heard it called a light rail.
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Old May 24th, 2008, 08:16 AM   #451
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These are my personal observations and some thoughts about transportation in Wuhan, with some pictures of the Metro when I rode on it yesterday.

Wuhan Metro

First things, the actual infrastructure is absolutely terrible. By actual infrastructure, I just mean Phase 1 of Line 1, that has already been built. It is abysmally dreary, dull and boring. I mean, yes they are there to fulfill a function but by God they just cut costs completely there. To add on top of that, the line is actually in the middle of a large, busy dual carriageway (Don't know what Americans call it, may an Avenue? Boulevard?). There are buses, taxis and private cars zipping all over the place and you need to cross these roads in order to access the Metro. Wasn't a great start, to be honest.

Here is the entrance to the Jianghanlu Stop. It isn't entirely awe-inspiring, but it does the job I guess:



Going in however into the station, it started to look better. It's very clean and relatively simple to navigate.

image hosted on flickr


Purchasing tickets is quite easy. There are touch screen ticketing machines. Touch your destination, pay for it and out come your tickets.

image hosted on flickr


The actual tickets were more like tokens that have something like an RFID chip in it. It was a little counter-intuitive and took me a few minutes to figure out how to use. You scanned them in at the start and to leave, you have to put it into a slot like a coin.

image hosted on flickr


From what I have heard, the system is undergoing massive expansion. I drew a map kind of to show what kind of expansion is taking place. This might not be 100% accurate as the plans seem to change constantly which doesn't fill me with hope because they've already started construction of this and if they are changing designs and routes at this point, that leaves a question as to whether this would have been adequately or even properly planned. But here it is, it isn't great nor finished, but I guess it does the job:



One thing it is missing, in my opinion, is a circle line that could act as the interchange line, the line you take to get onto another line. It would make sense in a project this size, otherwise getting from point A-B could get extremely confusing or require long-winded directions.

The actual rolling stock however is in my opinion top knotch. Although I read it as being configured for automated operation, the trains do have a driver on board. I also read that they operate trains 90 seconds apart, which isn't entirely true. I had to wait 5 minutes for the next train, quite long for metro standards, in my opinion. Here are the pictures:

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Inside the cars it was quite nice, clean, modern and very open. I rather liked it. You could walk from the the front of the train to the end of the train without any problems.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


As you can see however, ridership is low! I was on this at about 5-6pm, when it should be the rush hour period and most systems are crammed to capacity. The reason for this is just that the route doesn't serve a large enough of an area to be a suitable method of travel.

Plus there is no fare integration no integrated system with other forms of transport. It seems to compete with the buses which seem to be completely separate from the Metro. However, the Metro doesn't have any other stops as traffic lights and jams don't affect it!

The lack of a proper route, is due to poor planning. I mean, the first route should have connected Hankou, the main commercial heart of the city, with Wuchang, the educational heart. I truly believe that Line Number 2 would have been a far better and more successful line, had it been built first. But as it happens, it wasn't, but I do think they will correct it soon with all the new lines being built and in the pipeline. But, I really do believe they will need a circle connecting line for the city because with this many lines being planned, it would be rather necessary.
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Old May 24th, 2008, 06:23 PM   #452
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*jaw drops* I've travelled on subways a good amount in various parts of China, at all hours of the day, and that's by far the emptiest I've ever seen a car! And that's during rush hour?! Wuhan must have done something really wrong to get ridership *that* low...

Hopefully the planned expansions will help matters!

Meanwhile, I'm eagerly awaiting the opening of Line 10 here in Beijing. I'm sure it, too, will be unbearably crowded within ten minutes of starting operation, but at least I'll be unbearably crowded for a shorter period of time when I'm going across town!
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Old May 24th, 2008, 10:33 PM   #453
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That looks really bad for the city planners but for an average rider who is dependent on that one line, it could be a very good blessing. I'd kill for a subway car that empty during rush hours.

Beijing and Shanghai's subway systems are highly successful from the planner's perspective, but for the average commuter, the ride is a nightmare.

Article from CNN online:

BEIJING, China (CNN) -- As Bus No. 37 pulled up at the Wangfujing stop near his office, Chris Tsao watched the line of waiting passengers quickly dissipate into a familiar scene of mild chaos as they pressed their way onto the standing-room-only bus.
art.beijingsubway2.jpg

It's a squeeze: Commuters on the subway in Beijing pack into a busy train.
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1 of 3
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"This isn't too bad -- actually much better than the subway," observed the 35-year-old graphic designer one recent evening as he boarded the bus for home, some 6 kilometers away but easily a 40-minute trip in the capital's choking traffic.

As far as the preferred mode of public transportation goes, however, Tsao belongs to a growing number of Beijing residents who are opting for the slower bus to the supposedly far more efficient subway.

The Beijing Subway system, the country's oldest, is undergoing an unprecedented expansion ahead of the Summer Olympics. Three new lines will begin whisking passengers to and fro before the Games start in August and, by 2020, the route map will comprise 19 lines and 561 kilometers of tracks, making the network one of the world's largest.

Once a loyal subway rider, Tsao has given up on the train since last autumn. That was when the city authorities, in a bid to attract drivers of private cars off the road, slashed the ticket prices on the subway -- by more than half in some cases -- and introduced a flat fare of 2 Yuan (30 U.S. cents) with unlimited transfers.

The result has been undesirable: Surface roads remain congested and now so are subway stations. "Almost overnight the trains became so jam-packed that it was just mission impossible during rush hours," Tsao recalled.

"I always had to wait for four or five trains, and then got shoved into the train by the crowd behind me without having to lift my foot."

Other awkward moments ensued inside the sardine can-like carriages.

"As people typed on their phones right under my eyes, I was often forced to read their messages -- including a woman confessing to her husband about an affair," Tsao reminisced with some amusement.

After a few weeks of endurance, Tsao switched to the bus for a more dependable daily ride.

"On paper the subway is a lot faster, but buses are less crowded and have dedicated lanes on many streets -- I end up spending about the same amount of time on the road," he explained.
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Tsao's sentiment echoes those of many others, prompting media coverage and online debates on the city's increasingly strained subway system whose average daily users exceed 3.5 million.

Busy stations not only deploy "door pushers" to help commuters squeeze into the carriages during peak times but also limit the number of passengers on the platforms out of safety concerns.

Amid mounting complaints about the system's glaring inadequacy, officials have reassured the public the problems are growing pains. They promise a much more enjoyable journey when improved signals system and state-of-the-art trains are in place in the coming months.

Tsao has decided to stick to the bus for now, having learned about new airport-like security checks at major subways stations ahead of the Olympics.

Although the mostly non-air conditioned buses offer a rather unpleasant passenger experience during Beijing's long hot summer days, Tsao unfortunately doesn't have the one fallback option most of his fellow countrymen do.

"I can't bike," he admitted, blaming his mountainous hometown. "Many of us from Chongqing have never learned how to bike because it's just impractical to pedal in the hilly terrain."

Shanghai's metro during rush hours are not as bad because they have 3.5 million commuters spread over 8 lines instead of just 5 like Beijing's.
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Old May 25th, 2008, 03:18 AM   #454
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I wish that article were exaggerated, but sadly, it's not - Beijing's subway really is that crowded during rush hours. However, I would point out that it's worst on Lines 1 and 2 - the others aren't nearly as bad - and, though they're crowded around the clock, you only really need to worry about feeling like a sardine during rush hour.

And, sad to say, I don't think buses are any better. Sure, they go more places and are cheaper, but sometimes the crush of people is even worse. There have been numerous times when I've gotten on a bus, had a few people get in behind me, and found myself literally unable to move - trapped a step in from the door and completely surrounded by bodies. Getting off is always a minor adventure. Add that to the fact that, in most of Beijing, the buses are stuck in the same traffic everyone else is, and the subway is almost always a better option if you're going where it can take you.
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Old May 25th, 2008, 04:35 AM   #455
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Beijing definitely needs something like the Paris RER express rail system.

Same goes with half a dozen other Chinese cities.
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Old May 25th, 2008, 10:30 AM   #456
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Beijing is pretty terrible for Subway travel. Public conveniences like toilets aren't superb in many stations. They have also opted for a one way pedestrian system, which does make sense given the volume of people traveling through it, but it makes the distance required to change trains unacceptably long and arduous, often times involving long climbs up or down huge flights of stairs. I remember my last trip to Beijing, I had to wait for 4 trains to pass before we found a car that had enough space for us to fit into. But then, after having got in, personal hygiene isn't exactly fantastic and the smell was very strong.....

I mean, given the population density, I'd think they'd do better to have or try to create the worlds first double decker subway system. It makes sense given the volumes of passengers traveling and offer huge increases in capacity. But I guess what's been built has been built and to change it, it'd take far too much in terms of cost and disruption to the network.

Wuhan, on the other hand, it's buses are horrifically overcrowded. I was once in a small bus about 6 metres long, but they managed to pack something like 45 people into it. Granted many Chinese are small in stature and slim in build, but, 45 in a bus like that was absolutely crazy.

China is definitely suffering from a lack of capacity issue and they are trying to correct it. In 10 years time, things will be a lot better, but until then, commuters will have to suffer huge discomfort whilst commuting.
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Old June 5th, 2009, 12:33 PM   #457
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China invests 800 bln yuan in urban rail transit
China has approved over 800 billion yuan ($117 billion) investment for the construction of urban rail transit lines, providing noticeable impetus for domestic economic growth.

Twenty-eight cities have submitted proposals on 91 planned rail transit lines covering 2,600 kilometers, with at least 1 trillion yuan ($147 billion) needed. 19 cities had their construction proposals approved by the state. Seventy rail transit lines, with a total length of 2,100 kilometers will be completed by 2015, according to Gao Yucai, director of a professional committee with the China Communications and Transportation Association (CCTA).

Currently, 46 lines, with a total length of 1,212 kilometers are under construction in 14 cities around China. Twenty-nine lines are finished, amounting to nearly 780 kilometers, and have already been put into use in 10 cities including Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou.

The rapid development of urban rail transit plays an important role not only in reducing urban traffic pressure and air pollution but also in boosting economic growth. A subway costs about 600 million yuan ($88.2 million) per kilometer, consuming building materials like cement, reinforcing bars and stone in large quantities. It generates an even larger pull on China's equipment manufacturing sector.

China will have 55 urban rail transit lines, amounting to 1,500 kilometers by 2010. If each train costs 6 million yuan ($882.3 thousand) on average, the total investment in vehicles only will reach 36 billion yuan ($5.29 billion), according to officials in charge of the Passenger Coach Department of China CNR Corporation Limited.
http://english.people.com.cn/90001/9...4/6671098.html
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Old July 7th, 2009, 11:13 AM   #458
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Zhengzhou's line 1 has started construction. I don't have any photos or sources to post yet, but I happened to walk through a construction site yesterday on my way to the Western Bus Station.
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Old December 9th, 2009, 01:18 PM   #459
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22 Chinese cities to get subways
By Zhao Chunzhe (chinadaily.com.cn)

China's State Council has approved plans for 22 cities to build subways with a total investment of 882 billion yuan ($129 billion), the People's Daily Overseas Edition reported Wednesday.

Eleven cities in China currently have subways covering a total of 835.5 km.

China will also have another 89 subways measuring 2,500 km in total as of 2016 with an investment of 993 billion yuan ($145 billion).

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2...nt_9150502.htm
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Old December 9th, 2009, 07:29 PM   #460
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lol build em while they're cheap.
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