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Old March 14th, 2014, 10:50 PM   #1
Suburbanist
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Optimum maximum height for a residential skscraper

I know that making a build higher has the effect of increasing the total footprint for machinery and, especially, elevator shafts.

I also read about a non-linear effect on foundation and support strength costs that increase with height, especially on supertall territory.

So the question I have a question: roughly speaking, from a construction-only cost point of view what is the optimum height range of a residential skyscraper before demands for more elevators and marginal cost of another floor outpace the benefits of having more units to share overall construction costs?
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Old March 19th, 2014, 07:14 PM   #2
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"optimal" height depends heavily on factors such as local housing demand and supply, building codes, local zoning, architectural requirements, interest rates, urban context, city image, etc. Could be any number, really. There is no such thing as a "construction-only cost point of view" when it comes to skyscrapers if you want that number to make any sense.

Where you are from, in the Netherlands for example, 70 meters could be considered an optimal height as that's the height that befitting in most Dutch cities, plus it's also the threshold of what technically is considered to be high-rise. Going 1 meter over it means a set of extra measures kicking in, making it relatively more expensive to go taller.

When it comes to supertalls, the optimal height is whatever some rich foreigner is willing to pay for, really. In general supertalls don't make a lot of sense, but they're great structures anyway, which is why they exist.
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Old March 24th, 2014, 06:41 PM   #3
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Is there some place with skyscraper data like this:

- x% of internal surface floor taken up by elevators
- x% of internal volume devoted to support uses (shafts, mechanical rooms)

I'm also wondering about what skyscraper has the highest FAR considering only usable space.
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