daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > East Africa > Somalia > Economy & Business / Dhaqaalaha iyo Ganacsiga

Economy & Business / Dhaqaalaha iyo Ganacsiga Found urban images from all around the world not taken by you

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 23rd, 2014, 09:44 PM   #1
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

Renewable Energy Potential of Somalia | News and Development

If money wasn't an issue, Somalia can have massive potential in renewable energies, like solar and energy.

Solar energy map.



Wind energy map.

Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2014, 09:45 PM   #2
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

http://somalilandpress.com/renewable...-somalia-43324

Quote:
RENEWABLE ENERGY

Somalia is rich in energy resources, having unexploited reserves of oil and natural gas, untapped hydropower, extensive geothermal energy resources, many promising wind sites, and abundant sunshine, which can produce solar power. The major obstacles to development of these potentially available energy resources are political, financial and institutional. Traditional biomass fuels such as firewood and charcoal, primarily used in rural and poor communities, account for 82% of the country’s total energy consumption.

Solar

Average insolation stands at 5-7 kWh/ m2/day. With over 3,000 hours of high and constant sunlight annually, Somalia is ideally placed to utilise solar energy. Solar resources have been utilised for off-grid generation in the country, as well as for water heating for municipal buildings. Solar cooking has also seen some uptake in the country, and solar power is seen as the energy source of choice for the rehabilitation of many municipal buildings in the country, particularly health centres.

Wind

Wind speeds vary from 3-11.4 m/s. Four 50 kW turbines were installed in Mogadishu in 1988, Wind energy has also been utilised for water pumping, with installations made by the UN Trusteeship Administration of Somalia from as early as the 1940s. The country has large areas of shallow sea along its coastline, particularly suitable for off-shore wind power, with the added benefit that this resource is close to a number of major load centres, including Mogadishu and Berbera. Studies estimate that approximately 50% of the land area of the country has suitable wind speeds for power generation and 95% could benefit, and profit, from replacing diesel-powered water pumps with wind systems.
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2014, 09:51 PM   #3
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

Right now, due to lack of real government action, Somalia is reliant on foreign oil for almost 100% of it's energy needs, along with VERY inefficient charcoal for burning. Both are totally outdated ways of energy, the latter contributing to deforestation of our beautiful forests. Yes, Somalia has oil potential, but it will likely be dependent on foreign refineries to actually use it for energy. And yes, we will still need oil for cars, but for energy for our homes, and businesses, fossil fuels are outdated.

I'm not against oil exploration, but the potential in renewable energies greatly outpaces that of it. Imagine getting wind farms near the ocean along with solar panels on every home? These are energies without pollution so we don't need to ruin the environment. Given to us from the sky!

I honestly don't understand why nobody has looked into this...granted it isn't cheap but maybe a public private partnership can be done? Your thoughts?
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2014, 09:58 PM   #4
Hector_of_Troy
Registered User
 
Hector_of_Troy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,290
Likes (Received): 2399

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xusein View Post
Yes, Somalia has oil potential, but it will likely be dependent on foreign refineries to actually use it for energy. And yes, we will still need oil for cars, but for energy for our homes, and businesses, fossil fuels are outdated.
The feasibility study for East Africa's largest oil-refinery was done in the 1980s & about to be constructed on the outskirts of Mogadishu with a 200 thousand barrels a day capacity, but the civil war cut that project short. And that was 20 years ago with the help of Iraq & Romania. Today, Somalia has partnerships with countries that are far wealthier & eager to explore/mine our resources, first in line being Turkey. (already interested in Rare Earth minerals.)

Wind-farms are the way to go. 5000MW is all we really need for the entire country to be electrified, another 2000MW is needed to power industries. With our population this situation can be remedied within five years.
__________________

Hector of Troy liked this signature

Somalia64 liked this post
Hector_of_Troy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2014, 10:03 PM   #5
Somalia64
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 304
Likes (Received): 347

I can already see huge solar farms being constructed in Somaliland



And offshore wind farms in Puntland



What the Somali diaspora desperately needs to do is create big energy companies, as there can't be any real development without large scale manufacturing and no large scale manufacturing can be profitable without access to cheap energy!
Somalia64 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2014, 10:30 PM   #6
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hector_of_Troy View Post
The feasibility study for East Africa's largest oil-refinery was done in the 1980s & about to be constructed on the outskirts of Mogadishu with a 200 thousand barrels a day capacity, but the civil war cut that project short. And that was 20 years ago with the help of Iraq & Romania. Today, Somalia has partnerships with countries that are far wealthier & eager to explore/mine our resources, first in line being Turkey. (already interested in Rare Earth minerals.)

Wind-farms are the way to go. 5000MW is all we really need for the entire country to be electrified, another 2000MW is needed to power industries. With our population this situation can be remedied within five years.
I dunno, I think they need to fix their electrical grid first (unfortunately with imported oil) before building a very energy dependent oil refinery. The infrastructure isn't there right now.

Suppose you could say the same about solar or wind though -- we need at least some kind of reliable grid. Actually I think even with the prohibitively high expenses needed for renewable energy, it would be cheaper than the status quo. Somalia has some of the highest energy costs per capita in the world. Anything than continuing the status quo would make prices drop. I don't know if that's a sad thing or an opportunity yet.
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2014, 01:04 AM   #7
k6734
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 806
Likes (Received): 622

Why can't Somalia not invest in power grids. I know that Turkey is considering in installing a huge power grid in Mogadishu for cheaper and more efficient electricity.
k6734 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2014, 07:03 AM   #8
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

Great news, that is a start, but I'm not hearing much of anything for the rest of the country.

It's pretty frustrating...LOL, when you go to Somalia, you notice how sunny and windy it is.

Having a substandard electrical grid will cripple any kind of economic growth in the future eventually because it will keep costs prohibitively high to start energy intensive activities like factories. If done correctly, I think it could cost relatively cheap to build it in all Somali cities, most cities are pretty small in area, making it easier. And...while they are at it, they can make them go underground in areas.
__________________
SkyscraperCity SOOMAALIYA ~~~ The African Phoenix ~~~ Toronto (MY PICS)

k6734 liked this post
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2014, 10:54 PM   #9
Hector_of_Troy
Registered User
 
Hector_of_Troy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,290
Likes (Received): 2399

Well if a group of Somali companies independently can set up a 50 MW power plant in Mogadishu for $100 million, wind farms with a capacity of 100-300 MW are reachable too. The likes of Dahabshiil, Hormuud or Sahal Gas/SomGas need to be informed on the huge benefits of renewable energy for their customers or their future projects (such as a cement plant in the case of Dahabshiil).

The entity that can make the biggest difference however is the Federal government. Not just by restarting the 200 MW grid system, but expanding it with investments from Turkey, Japan, US, UK, China, etc. Ghana has an electrification rate of 70% with 2000 MW installed capacity but with roughly 10 million more people than Somalia to power & a bigger industrial base. Our situation can be rectified very fast & efficiently as industries grow.

The real kick would be if we achieved universal power through renewables.
__________________

Hector of Troy liked this signature

k6734 liked this post
Hector_of_Troy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2014, 12:38 AM   #10
Somalia64
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 304
Likes (Received): 347

Somalia has one of the largest (if not the largest) uranium deposits in the world!

Quote:
Industry sources say the deposits may exceed a quarter of the world's known reserves of 800,000 tons. Moreover, they said, the uranium lies close to the surface and can permit strip-mining techniques which is far less costly than deep-mining.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=somalia&hl=en
Hopefully, with the help of countries like turkey we will be able to take full advantage of these deposits to power the country! It would be mutually beneficial for both parties as we could agree to export the surplus energy to them slightly below the prevailing international prices; and even though nuclear power can be risky, it's clean energy and we happen to have the raw materials necessary in abundance
__________________

k6734 liked this post
Somalia64 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2014, 01:36 AM   #11
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

Uranium isn't as lucrative as it sounds. I don't think Somalia, even if it happened to get the money, would be allowed to be a nuclear power. And the Turkish investment might not be as nice as it looks; they might want to get cheap uranium from us to power their own plants one day if they decided to get them (which is several times more likely). I'm much more optimistic about solar and wind personally.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hector_of_Troy View Post
Well if a group of Somali companies independently can set up a 50 MW power plant in Mogadishu for $100 million, wind farms with a capacity of 100-300 MW are reachable too. The likes of Dahabshiil, Hormuud or Sahal Gas/SomGas need to be informed on the huge benefits of renewable energy for their customers or their future projects (such as a cement plant in the case of Dahabshiil).
Do you think these companies are interested in the energy sector? Haven't heard much from them.
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2014, 02:07 AM   #12
Somalia64
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 304
Likes (Received): 347

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xusein View Post
Uranium isn't as lucrative as it sounds. I don't think Somalia, even if it happened to get the money, would be allowed to be a nuclear power. And the Turkish investment might not be as nice as it looks; they might want to get cheap uranium from us to power their own plants one day if they decided to get them (which is several times more likely). I'm much more optimistic about solar and wind personally.
That's an interesting point; the United Nations General Assembly passed as resolution on the "peaceful use of nuclear energy for economic and social development". No country can deny our right to have nuclear energy - we are not Iran - we don't have the technology to build nukes nor are we threatened in such a way that we feel the need to acquire them.

Quote:
Taking into consideration the legitimate right of States to develop or acquire technology for the peaceful use of nuclear energy in order to accelerate their economic development
I think your scepticism about turkey is fair but we don't necessarily need another country to help us build nuclear powerplants, we can let the private sector take care of this. Hopefully, if we also find oil we will have the capital to encourage foreign investors to build these nuclear power plants by giving them the land and partially funding the construction.
__________________

k6734 liked this post

Last edited by Somalia64; March 25th, 2014 at 02:13 AM.
Somalia64 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2014, 04:53 AM   #13
k6734
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 806
Likes (Received): 622

36 trillion dollars worth of Uranium is hell of a lot of money, just 1% of that money is enough to build Somalia 50x over.

We could build mega Somali cities with that money and why not give the Turks free Uranium since they helped Somalia so much, we owe it to them.

And the world is starting to heavily depend on Uranium, making Somalia even more relevant as a energy rich resource hub.
k6734 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2014, 02:46 PM   #14
Somalia64
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 304
Likes (Received): 347

Quote:
Originally Posted by k6734 View Post
36 trillion dollars worth of Uranium is hell of a lot of money, just 1% of that money is enough to build Somalia 50x over.

We could build mega Somali cities with that money and why not give the Turks free Uranium since they helped Somalia so much, we owe it to them.

And the world is starting to heavily depend on Uranium, making Somalia even more relevant as a energy rich resource hub.
I agree with everything you said but lets not get carried away with the whole free uranium thing , we can certainly reduce the price but we need all the money we can get if we want to catch up with the rest of the world.
Somalia64 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 25th, 2014, 10:49 PM   #15
Arrow87
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 220
Likes (Received): 227

Uranium didn't for sure help Niger. The country has a lot of uranium, but is still poorer than Somalia (It always baffles me how some nations are poorer than Somalia). I think a French company is running Niger's uranium.

I see uranium as just one of many incomes Somalia can have. Regardless of how much income it can generate, we should not focus too much on it. Always diversify.

Back to renewable energy, we should definitely focus on solar and wind energy.

Here's an example of a Chinese company that has won a contract in Ethiopia. They will build and install 102 wind turbines with a total of 153KW for 95 million dollars. That's a nice deal considering it's usually much more expensive.

LINK

Arrow87 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2014, 12:26 AM   #16
k6734
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 806
Likes (Received): 622

Yeah I don't know what the F happened to Niger, they shouldn't be poor but it looks like the French are stealing their resources.
k6734 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2014, 04:06 AM   #17
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,165
Likes (Received): 9812

Quote:
Originally Posted by k6734 View Post
And the world is starting to heavily depend on Uranium, making Somalia even more relevant as a energy rich resource hub.
Opposite actually. After the whole Japan tsunami, people got freaked out about nuclear again. Japan is stopping them, Germany is phasing them out, etc.

PS: That 102 turbines for $95m is insane. In any western nation, the price would be definitely ten times as much.

Somalia has more potential in wind and solar than Ethiopia, FWIW.
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2014, 07:22 PM   #18
Hector_of_Troy
Registered User
 
Hector_of_Troy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,290
Likes (Received): 2399

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrow87 View Post
Uranium didn't for sure help Niger. The country has a lot of uranium, but is still poorer than Somalia (It always baffles me how some nations are poorer than Somalia).
You shouldn't. Despite the negative rep Somalia export earnings are probably the highest in the Horn of Africa with the current levels of livestock being sold to the Middle-East. The money goes directly back to independents rather than a state-owned company, hence that money immediately circulates in the Somali economy. Add to this the amount of cheap goods being re-exported through Dubai by Somali merchants & the high level of remittances & clearly Somalis aren't as poor as their made out to be (outside of those directly displaced by war). Just look at the millions of mobile subcribers, the millions of internet users or even the vast quantities of khat being imported worth hundreds of millions of dollars.
__________________

Hector of Troy liked this signature

DenHaagSomali liked this post

Last edited by Hector_of_Troy; March 26th, 2014 at 07:37 PM.
Hector_of_Troy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 3rd, 2014, 03:39 PM   #19
The Rt. Hon.
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 287
Likes (Received): 67

Ethiopia opens Africa's biggest windfarm - 28 October 2013

Quote:


A windfarm billed as the biggest in sub-Saharan Africa has been opened by Ethiopia's prime minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, a potentially crucial step for the continent's renewable energy industry. The €210m (£179m) Ashegoda windfarm consists of 84 hi-tech turbines towering above an arid region where villagers herd cattle and ride donkey-drawn carts as they have for generations.

The project, outside Mekelle in Tigray state, about 475 miles north of the capital, Addis Ababa, has a capacity of 120MW and will produce about 400m KWh a year. It was completed in phases over three and a half years and has produced 90m KWh for the national grid.

The government plans to build a "climate resilient" economy by 2025 (pdf), with adequate energy even if hydro power runs short because of reduced rainfall. A study by Chinese firm Hydrochina confirmed the high potential for wind power in the northern and southern parts of Ethiopia, particularly in the Somali region, with a huge estimated wind energy potential of 1.3m MW, according to Reuters.

http://www.theguardian.com/global-de...ggest-windfarm




The red squares represent the area that would be enough for solar power plants to produce a quantity of electricity consumed by the world today, in Europe (EU-25) and Germany (De).
__________________

Somalia64 liked this post
The Rt. Hon. no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 3rd, 2014, 04:24 PM   #20
Somalia64
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 304
Likes (Received): 347

Somalis need to be as obsessed about Energy as they are about Roads if the country is to develop!
__________________

The Rt. Hon. liked this post
Somalia64 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:50 PM. • styleid: 14


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu