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Old March 25th, 2014, 11:33 PM   #21
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Map of Sprinter tram-train north of San Diego:



And heritage Port of LA Waterfront Red Car:

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Old March 26th, 2014, 05:27 AM   #22
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Neighbouring cities Mississauga and Brampton are planning a joint LRT line linking both downtowns, three commuter rail lines and two transfer points with regional/commuter bus routes. Most of the planning has been done, all that remains is to secure funding for the project.



It will run in it own ROW from the Nanwood stop in the north to the North Service stop in the south plus the section between Port Credit GO and Elizabeth. There's still some fine tuning at the Queen stop as to whether it will be in a ROW or in mixed traffic. All other sections or the route, due to nature of the street, will run in mixed traffic.

Toronto is also working on adding LRT in suburban corridors. Depending on who you ask since no one's ever seen one, everyone's thinking it will be more like the existing streetcar network, three of which operate in a ROW but have no signal priority.
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Old March 26th, 2014, 09:36 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
I'd love for Montreal and Halifax to re-introduce street cars.
You see? there you go AGAIN: You MIGHT while Montrealers themselves certainly DON'T .. you evidently bear a perplexing habit at -uhm- "segmenting population" dontcha, eh?
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Old March 29th, 2014, 12:40 AM   #24
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You polled all 4 million Montrealers I suppose. And what does any of that have to do with what I'd like to see anyway?
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Old March 31st, 2014, 09:28 PM   #25
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Milwaukee streetcar map (future):

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Old March 31st, 2014, 09:56 PM   #26
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I don't know anything about Milwaukee, so forgive me for speaking from ignorance, but that looks like a very slow, indirect route.
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Old March 31st, 2014, 10:34 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
I don't know anything about Milwaukee, so forgive me for speaking from ignorance, but that looks like a very slow, indirect route.
More about Milwaukee streetcar here:
http://www.themilwaukeestreetcar.com
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Old March 31st, 2014, 11:18 PM   #28
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Thanks, with the future expansions in mind the proposed line actually makes a lot more sense.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 01:55 PM   #29
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Would we count a system like Sacramento as a 'streetcar'? It does run down the street after all, much like the Calgary C-train does. In Europe we still call modern light rail systems that run on streets 'trams', even though they're way longer and more train-like than the trams of the 1950s and before.

I'm particularly interested in places like Portland and Seattle where you have large LRT systems and smaller streetcar systems both sharing the same streets.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 03:04 PM   #30
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The APTA has a site dedicated to streetcars and streetcar design. It's well worth a look, and contain a lot of guides on track design and types of vehicles available to the North American market.

It's current, too.

http://modernstreetcar.org/
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Old April 4th, 2014, 04:36 PM   #31
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From Railway Gazette, the news of new line 3 of Guadalajara light rail network:

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http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/n...to-tender.html

Guadalajara Line 3 out to tender
04 Apr 2014

MEXICO: Governor of Jalisco state Aristóteles Sandoval has signed off tendering documents for the project to build Line 3 of the Guadalajara light rail network.

The 21·5 km route runs on a northwest-southeast alignment and is expected to cost nearly 17·7bn pesos. Around three-quarters of the alignment will be elevated, with just over 5·3 km in tunnel. If the planned construction timescale is maintained, the line is expected to open in 2017.

End-to-end journey time is expected to be 33 min with 18 stops, using a fleet of 18 trainsets able to run at a maximum speed of 90 km/h. Each train will be able to carry 500 passengers. Peak-hour services are to operate at 5 min intervals, reducing to every 10 min off-peak, and traffic is expected to reach 233 000 trips a day.

Operator Siteur says that the scheme will create 7 000 direct jobs during the construction phase.

Details of the project were announced at a seminar organised in London by UK Trade & Investment on March 31
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Old April 21st, 2014, 09:03 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
what I'd like to see anyway?
There just might be hope for this violent social engineer, scaling his aberration back to like from adoration

You see, you shan't hear about the fact that about ⅔ of the city wishing the metro be extended from the minority anglo solitude here coz its 'very own' media don't sayso, whereas the major franco solitude saidso many a time (<1/6 Montrealers wish trams .. we've ample experience here knowing just how rapid as well as the extent of their saviourship in either snowstorms or bone-rattling chills all our underground trains here are). BTW, some other engineer outta McGill wrote a full-page op-ed a few years back, abominably DETAILING how to go about converting the city's Blue line into a tramway coz he BELIEVED its patronage to be justifiably low, yet a short while afterwards the city FINALLY came to its senses by augmenting off-peak runs from 3- to 6-car services. If trams end up being rammed up our you-guess-whats, then they ought to start out on a busy boulevard that's not central .. Pie-IX or St-Michel, what with the latter one supposedly hosting the highest bus ridership on the island .. CDN Rd is too hilly a critical artery to be toying about with teething problems at construction, while the merchants along Park Av just ain't interested, plus their breadths for such tramway construction would provide NO space at negotiating around the tramworks (all in all, you and I ARE talking about Quebec here ); besides, both of these thoroughfares underwent multi-year roadworks from retrofitting its water and sewer mains, so must you REALLY sayso that they suffer further rounds of having their lives turned upside down? Anyhow, city administrators still clearly bear MUCH reluctance at taking that :pfft: tinily little concluding step at full implementation of its O.PUS!!!! fare scheme whereby proof-of-payment boardings at any bus door be adopted .. our deficient electronic cards still double our boarding times .. no more of waving that bus pass nice ♪Bonjours♪ at our drivers either.
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Old April 21st, 2014, 05:50 PM   #33
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Toronto's controversial mayor wants to get rid of streetcars:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle17903662/

http://www.thestar.com/news/city_hal...n_streets.html
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Old April 21st, 2014, 10:43 PM   #34
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Quote:
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This is is why you don't do drugs kids!

Only a crackhead would attempt to literally push the self destruct button on his own city by destroying it's transportation network .
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Old April 21st, 2014, 11:16 PM   #35
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From New York Times:

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/ar...=nyregion&_r=0

Brooklyn to Queens, but Not by Subway
APRIL 20, 2014, by Michael Kimmelman


Proposed route


Taken from Next New York

Imagining a Streetcar Line Along the Waterfront

There’s a wonderful term for the dirt trails that people leave behind in parks: desire lines.

Cities also have desire lines, marked by economic development and evolving patterns of travel. In New York, Manhattan was once the destination for nearly all such paths, expressed by subway tracks that linked Midtown with what Manhattanites liked to call the outer boroughs.

But there is a new desire line, which avoids Manhattan altogether.

It hugs the waterfronts of Brooklyn and Queens, stretching from Sunset Park past the piers of Red Hook, to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, through Greenpoint and across Newtown Creek, which separates the two boroughs, running all the way up to the Triborough Bridge in Astoria.

The desire line is now poorly served by public transit, even as millennials are colonizing Astoria, working in Red Hook, then going out in Williamsburg and Bushwick — or working at the Navy Yard, visiting friends in Long Island City and sleeping in Bedford-Stuyvesant.

They have helped drive housing developments approved or built along the Brooklyn waterfront, like the one by Two Trees at the former Domino Sugar Refinery. But this corridor isn’t only for millennials. It’s also home to thousands of less affluent New Yorkers struggling to get to jobs and join the work force.

So here’s an idea: bring back the streetcar.

Some of this route is served — barely — by subway lines like the G, the city’s sorriest little railroad. In Astoria, stations for the N and Q are nearly a full mile or more from the East River, meaning a vast swath of that neighborhood is virtually disconnected from the subway system. It’s an area ripe for growth — for new housing, start-ups and other small businesses and industries — all the more so with the coming of the Cornell Tech campus on Roosevelt Island, just across the river and linked to Queens via the F. One can imagine another Silicon Alley spanning Cornell, Astoria, Williamsburg and Sunset Park.

Right now, it’s easier by subway to get from Long Island City to Midtown, or from Downtown Brooklyn to Wall Street, than it is to get from housing projects in Fort Greene or Long Island City to jobs in Williamsburg, or from much of Red Hook to — well, almost anywhere.

A few Brooklyn and Queens residents may like their inaccessibility, but transit is about more than getting around. It maps a city’s priorities, creating a spine and a future for neighborhoods. It’s about economic as well as social mobility. So while Mayor Bill de Blasio continues to refine his agenda, including that promise of 200,000 units of affordable housing, he might consider a streetcar connecting Red Hook to Astoria.

Why a streetcar? Buses are a more obvious solution. Improved bus service is an easier sell, faster to get up and running, and cheaper up front. A bus would be ... fine.

But where’s the romance? A streetcar is a tangible, lasting commitment to urban change. It invites investment and becomes its own attraction. I’m not talking Ye Olde Trolley. This is transit for New Yorkers who can’t wait another half-century for the next subway station.

Streetcars connect neighborhoods and people to other modes of transit. They aren’t about getting around quickly (although the streetcars in Atlanta and Salt Lake City have the capacity to go pretty fast); promising prototypes are self-sustaining and wire free. Some systems bleed money, but in cities like Seattle and Portland, Ore., retail and real estate values have boomed along the routes.

Streetcars don’t hog the road, either. Part of Kent Avenue in Brooklyn, at the heart of the waterfront corridor, was recently narrowed to make room for bikes and pedestrians. A full-fledged light-rail line would require its own lane and create an obstacle between most of Brooklyn and a waterfront that has taken decades to reclaim for public use.

But a modern streetcar, using only a modest track buried a few inches into the asphalt, shares the road and flows with existing traffic. By providing an alternative to cars, streetcars also dovetail with Mayor De Blasio’s vow to improve pedestrian safety. And there is this additional political virtue: no permission required. Even though the mayor has to grapple with Albany and doesn’t run the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, he rules the city streets.

Credit for thinking up the route belongs to Alex Garvin, the urban planner. He floated the idea nearly a decade ago as a bulkier light rail line. The proposal was discussed in City Hall and in planning circles but languished. Updated, its time has come. The route — others are possible, so let the debate begin — would start in Astoria Park and run along 21st Street. Moving south to Long Island City, it would cross a dedicated, movable bridge to be built across Newtown Creek with bikes lanes and room for pedestrians, restoring a subway bridge torn down years ago.

In Brooklyn, the route would follow Commercial Street to Franklin Street to Kent Avenue and eventually end up on Columbia Street at the Erie Basin in Red Hook, along the way linking to subways and to ferries that now suffer because they’re disconnected from the transit network.

I called Brad Read, whose California firm, Tig/m, is one of the companies developing self-powered, wireless streetcars. He came up with $241 million as a cost for the cars and installing the rails along the route. So double that number once or twice back here on Planet Earth, then add the bridge and operating expenses.... O.K., I hear the Bronx cheers. Too expensive, not important enough, a pipe dream. But the truth, though, is that healthy transit-supported development — we’re not talking about a $4 billion Path Station here — nearly always pays dividends in New York.

A streetcar for Red Hook was mooted several years ago and didn’t gain much traction because ridership was anticipated to be low. But this route feeds into a more ambitious network and looks toward growth, just as the ferries are heavily subsidized because they’re supposed to lay the groundwork for the future. Today, a city that attracts young entrepreneurs who favor old, mixed neighborhoods and industrial buildings, and whose employees like to ride bikes, take public transit and live near work is thinking ahead. So is a city that doesn’t leave behind its poor citizens in neighborhoods that have long had meager access to public transit. Housing costs come down to more than the cost of housing; they include the cost of transportation, in hours and dollars. A streetcar, in that respect, is about making more affordable vast public housing campuses in Fort Greene, Williamsburg, Long Island City and Astoria, as well.


There will always be competing priorities, limited resources and buses. But New York shouldn’t throttle its ambitions. Remember when bike lines were considered impossible? The mayor ought to lead the way here. The city’s urban fabric can’t be an afterthought. The keys to improved city life — better health care, housing, schools, culture, business, tourism and recreation — all have spatial implications. New York’s great leaders in the past have capitalized on the city’s physical opportunities, not ignored them.

Urban planners talk about how transit-oriented development concentrates density around transit hubs. The streetcar for Brooklyn and Queens is development-oriented transit. Before the subway came the Manhattan grid, conceived some 200 years ago. The expectation then was that most people would move east and west toward the busy waterfronts along the shorter numbered streets, not north and south. But desire lines turned out otherwise, and over decades the grid was rejiggered and adapted to include avenues like Madison and Lexington, and Central Park.

Now neighborhoods along the waterfront beckon again. Is the city up to the challenge?
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Old April 21st, 2014, 11:26 PM   #36
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So Ottawa, Hamilton, and Edmonton are building street car lines or is it LRT? I'd love for Montreal and Halifax to re-introduce street cars.
no they aren't, though Kitcheners and Hamiltons LRTs will operate very similar to streetcars in some parts. By euro standards they would be considered trams, but they aren't a streetcar in the North American sense. Edmonton is a full out LRT. No idea on Montreal.
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Old April 21st, 2014, 11:52 PM   #37
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I'm particularly interested in places like Portland and Seattle where you have large LRT systems
San Diego's is worth checking out .. their morning rush hours, busy as they indeed are, feel remarkably laid back .. Edmonton's seems the most impressive operation on the continent, while Calgary's commendable system still hadn't compelled me to ride it.
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Old April 22nd, 2014, 03:39 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
San Diego's is worth checking out .. their morning rush hours, busy as they indeed are, feel remarkably laid back .. Edmonton's seems the most impressive operation on the continent, while Calgary's commendable system still hadn't compelled me to ride it.
By North American standards the 69th Street to Sunalta Station into downtown Calgary is amazing. Lines are straight, curves have a large radii, speeds are high, and, the elevated portion into downtown would, flat out, not be built in the US (of course more property brokers would get richer in the US too...)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5C1HjIouaEc
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Old April 22nd, 2014, 09:57 AM   #39
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Reading the name Sunalta I presumed you were referring to SD, thus for a second or so there watching that clip I mistook that dusting of snow as remnants of some sandstorm. (Calgary wasn't easy on the eyes plus the place wasn't lively, so we hit the road again.)
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Old May 15th, 2014, 12:55 PM   #40
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From Rail Journal:

Quote:
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=542

Waterloo light rail reaches financial close
Thursday, May 15, 2014



THE Region of Waterloo, Ontario, has reached financial close on a 33-year PPP contract to design, build, finance, operate, and maintain the city's first light rail line

The contract has been awarded to GrandLinq, a consortium comprising Plenary Group Canada; Meridiam Infrastructure Waterloo; Aecon; Kiewit; Mass Electric Construction Canada; Keolis; STV Canada Construction and CIBC World Markets.

Keolis will operate and maintain the line for 30 years and expects the contract to generate revenues of $C 550m over the duration of the concession. Aecon says its share of the contract is worth approximately $US 250m.

The 19km 16-station line will run from Conestoga Mall in Waterloo to Fairview Park Mall in Kitchener. Construction will begin this month and the line is due to open in 2017. Services will be operated by a fleet of 14 Bombardier Flexity Freedom LRVs (pictured).

Ridership is forecast to be around 27,000 passengers in the first full year of operation, rising to 56,000 by 2031.

Ontario has committed up to $C 300m in funding, bolstered by Canadian federal government funding of $C 265m and regional contributions of $C 253m.

The regional government says the contract was awarded to Grandlinq in March, but the final short-term and long-term financing costs were not finalised until May 6
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