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Old May 16th, 2014, 02:19 PM   #41
dimlys1994
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From Railway Gazette:

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http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/u...ine-order.html

CAF wins Boston Green Line order
16 May 2014



USA: The Massachusetts Department of Transportation board approved a $118m contract on May 14 for CAF USA to supply 24 light rail vehicles for Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s Boston Green Line, including the Green Line Extension project. About half of the cost is to be met by a Federal Transit Administration New Start grant. Deliveries will run from the end of 2017 until the end 2018.

The 70% low-floor LRVs are designated Type 9 by MBTA. They will have ‘dynamic computer-controlled lighting, heating and cooling’, and will meet the latest ADA accessibility requirements with four wheelchair/pram spaces. All priority seats will have space underneath to accommodate assistance animals or mobility equipment. CCTV will cover the passenger areas, doors and track.

CAF is to produce the bodyshells in Spain, with final assembly and testing at its plant in Elmira, New York, to comply with Buy America regulations.

MassDOT plans to award a contract later this year for 74 metro cars for the Red Line and 152 for the Orange Line
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Old May 17th, 2014, 02:28 AM   #42
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Thats some short fugliness bleah
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Old August 6th, 2014, 05:55 PM   #43
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From Global Rail News:

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http://www.globalrailnews.com/2014/0...-rail-project/

San Antonio withdraws support for light rail project
5 AUG, 2014



The City of San Antonio is withdrawing $32 million it had planned to invest in a new light rail project for the city, citing a lack of public support for the project.

City officials have asked public transport operator VIA to come up with new proposals for a “comprehensive multi-modal transportation” strategy and defer plans for a tram system in downtown San Antonio, which had been expected to open in 2017.

In a statement, Mayor Ivy Taylor said: “We hear and understand the concerns of our community and agree to discontinue our involvement in the streetcar project. We wish to give San Antonio residents the opportunity to provide input on a new proposal which could culminate with a community-wide vote.

“The public’s support and participation in deciding on public transit services is important to the city. It is also consistent with the city’s current effort to update the San Antonio Comprehensive Master Plan and Transportation Plan.”

VIA board chairman Alexander Briseño said: “We are thankful to those who shared the vision of creating a new transit option that would have invigorated our central business district and connected the region.

“Although we are disappointed that the value of the modern streetcar was not understood or realised by many, we remain optimistic.

“We are focused and committed to continue the path of this well thought out 2035 Comprehensive Transportation Plan and achieving our mission.”

The $32 million earmarked for the light rail project will now be invested into San Antonio’s bus rapid transit network
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Old August 7th, 2014, 09:20 PM   #44
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Thats some short fugliness bleah

Especially when compared with Siemens' 3 SD-200 concept designs for MUNI
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Old August 7th, 2014, 09:47 PM   #45
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The Seattle map early in this thread is missing quite a bit ...

especially the planned extension from Northgate north to Lynnwood as well as the entire East Link line to Mercer Island, Bellevue and Redomnd

and the southern extension to Federal Way that planning is beginning on.

In addition, the Center City Connector is missing that will join our two surface streetcar lines
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Old August 9th, 2014, 01:46 PM   #46
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http://www.economist.com/news/united...er?frsc=dg%7Ca

Streetcars and urban renewal
Rolling blunder


Federal subsidies have inspired some silly transit projects
Aug 9th 2014 | WASHINGTON, DC | From the print edition


A streetcar named desire

LATE and over budget, streetcars are finally rumbling to life in Washington, DC. The long-awaited service, which has cost at least $135m to build, spans 2.4 miles along H Street in the city’s north-east. But it is not taking passengers yet. Operators are still learning how to drive the electric trains, which may come into service by the end of the year. In the meantime, locals can hop on the bus: plenty of them already ply this route, and often at a faster clip.

Most American cities paved over their streetcar tracks decades ago, deeming the services slow, rickety and inconvenient. Commuters have long preferred cars and buses. But streetcars—sometimes known as trolleys or trams—are making a comeback. Services are rolling out in at least 16 American cities, with dozens more in the works. Even bankrupt Detroit has begun work on a three-mile line that is expected to cost $137m.

Fans say streetcars create jobs and spark urban investment. Developers like them because they run on fixed tracks, which means official commitment to a route is locked in. Boosters point to Portland, Oregon, which unveiled America’s first streetcar line with modern vehicles in 2001. One study found that the city’s westside line attracted new business and housing valued at more than 24 times its construction cost. Plans in Atlanta and Tucson have similarly generated hundreds of millions of dollars in private investment and raised property values. The District’s H Street neighbourhood has been moving upmarket for years, but some credit the promise of a streetcar with accelerating development.

Others are more sceptical. The relationship between streetcars and development is not clear, say researchers funded by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). In cities where streetcars have led to urban renewal, they are part of larger, heavily subsidised development plans, with changes in zoning, improvements to streets and other upgrades. And while streetcars are cheaper than other rail projects, they are still costly to build and maintain. Operating expenses are more than twice those for buses, according to data from the FTA, and capital costs are hefty. Tucson’s project, for example, cost nearly $200m and opened years late, in part because the city had to clear utilities from under the tracks, install overhead electrical connections and repave much of the four-mile route.

All this investment might make some sense if streetcars offered an efficient way to move people around. But here, too, the evidence is flimsy. Unlike European trams, which often cover long stretches in independent lanes, American streetcars tend to span walkable distances and share the road with other vehicles. This means they inch along with traffic, often at less than 12 miles per hour, on tracks that make it impossible to navigate busy streets or ride around obstacles. Indeed, their slow speeds and frequent stops mean they often cause more congestion. A bus route could move up to five times more people an hour, says Randal O’Toole of the Cato Institute, a think-tank.

If streetcars are so slow and costly, why are there suddenly so many? Because federal subsidies have encouraged them. Under Barack Obama the Department of Transportation has made grants of up to $75m available to “small” projects that promise to revitalise urban areas and cut greenhouse-gas emissions. They need not be cost-effective in the conventional sense if they make a place more liveable or offer other vague benefits.

America’s streetcar revival is gobbling up funds that might otherwise go towards cheaper, nimbler forms of public transport, such as buses. This is not only wasteful, but tends to favour better-off riders, such as tourists and shoppers. Poorer residents are mainly served by buses, if at all, says Daniel Chatman of the University of California, Berkeley, who studies regional planning. “The economics of many light-rail and streetcar projects is abysmal,” he adds.

Well-designed bus routes can spur development, too, and at far lower cost, says Adie Tomer of the Brookings Institution, a think-tank. According to the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, another think-tank, Cleveland’s rapid-bus service has attracted $5.8 billion in private investment along its 6.8-mile route. It was built in 2008 for around $50m—just a third of the cost of the District’s streetcar.

From the print edition: United States
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Old August 9th, 2014, 06:44 PM   #47
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Brookings?

Cato?

Yeah.

I'll just ignore anything that comes from those oil-baron mouthpieces.
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Old August 10th, 2014, 09:29 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
Brookings?

Cato?

Yeah.

I'll just ignore anything that comes from those oil-baron mouthpieces.
Cato is total hack garbage, of course, but Brookings is not. They're a generally center-left source of reasonable ideas. They're wrong for liking buses, which are a total of waste of time (BRT being the fetish of the moment), but right for hating on streetcars, which are too bus-like to be useful and too expensive to be a cheap alternative.
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Old August 11th, 2014, 03:37 AM   #49
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BRT is so popular with US tranist activists beacause it has been met with great success in South American Cities that are strapped for cash, and they think that maybe it will be appealing because it cause so little when compared to tram, light rail, and heavy rail, which are progressively expensive and no one wants to be on the hook for million to billion dollar boondoggles.
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Old August 11th, 2014, 05:00 AM   #50
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I cant stand that word boondoggle, especially when it comes from some idiot reactionary, whining about California High Speed Rail. Furthermore, I mean just listen to the sound of the word, "boondoggle". It sounds like some kind of awful Dr. Seuss animal, or like some super sleazy term for having sex.
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Old August 12th, 2014, 10:54 PM   #51
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Ten bucks says you're right about it being an old euphemism for sex, but ya no one wants to be on the hook for the money!
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Old August 13th, 2014, 12:47 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
Toronto is the only Canadian city with streetcars. Whitehorse and Nelson have tourist lines that go from nowhere to nowhere, Calgary and Edmonton run LRTs that are nothing like streetcars, and Vancouver runs a full on metro line that due to its unique technology many like to label as an LRT while in reality it is nothing like one.

Ottawa as of today has no electrified rail of any kind, I don't know where you are getting that they have streetcars.

That said, Toronto's network is by far the largest in North America.

Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
So Ottawa, Hamilton, and Edmonton are building street car lines or is it LRT? I'd love for Montreal and Halifax to re-introduce street cars.
Actually both Edmonton and Calgary have vintage streetcars that go from nowhere to nowhere. In Edmonton, there are two separate, unconnected vintage streetcar systems, they are both operated by the Edmonton Radial Railway Society. One operates in Fort Edmonton Park, a park that restores late 19th century, early 20th century Edmonton. The other system was built upon the former Canadian Pacific railway, it runs from the Strathcona neighborhood in the south bank of North Saskatchewan River to Downtown on the north bank, and the bridge the streetcar crosses is 49m above the water, because of that, they claim it is the highest bridge crossed by a streetcar in the world.

http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/

Calgary has a Heritage Park which is similar to Edmonton's Fort Edmonton Park, and there is a streetcar system running in it as well.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 12:46 AM   #53
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To me, the question of buses versus trams is a matter of priorities. Does a city's bus system have a fare card system rather than requiring passengers to make payment while boarding? Does a city have a good network of bike lanes? Those things are relatively cheap to fix compared to the cost of even a short tram line. A fare card system and bike lanes can also benefit far more people than a tram line.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 03:15 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_christine View Post
To me, the question of buses versus trams is a matter of priorities. Does a city's bus system have a fare card system rather than requiring passengers to make payment while boarding? Does a city have a good network of bike lanes? Those things are relatively cheap to fix compared to the cost of even a short tram line. A fare card system and bike lanes can also benefit far more people than a tram line.
I agree with that.

First, a city needs to have a good bus service. If a certain line is overflowed, then a Bus Rapid Transit must be implemented. It BRT is overflowed, then an Streetcar should be implemented.

Streetcars are beautiful but very expensive, and needs a lot of daily passengers (not the case for the majority of US cities due to urban sprawl).
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Old August 14th, 2014, 06:38 AM   #55
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The notion of Americans not willing to accept BRT is a fallacy propagated by LRT manufacturers and politicians itching for a ribbon cutting ceremony before the next election.

Cleveland's Healthline has been a wonderful success and created a huge amount of TOD along Euclid. The ridership has doubled along the route which was already the busiest transit route in the city. LA's Orange and Silver lines are a success as are Pittsburgh's BRT Transitway and the Miami-Dade busway.

What streetcar and LRT propoenents fail to measure is that the extra amount payed for a streetcar/LRT is money that could have gone into the regular transit system. A fair comparison is not what the ridership will be on a single line of LRT or BRT but rather ridership based on money spent.

If they spend $1 billion on an LRT, is that getting better ridership than $1 billion spent on a BRT that maybe 4 or 5 times as large serving hundreds of thousands of more people and far more destinations? Also these expensive systems in the US which tend to get low ridership often are a disproportionate drain on operational costs.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 06:58 AM   #56
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The vast majority of light rail/streetcar systems in the US have massive traffic flows.

And if the LA Orange line is such a good example, why are they currently studying converting it to LRT?
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Old August 14th, 2014, 07:12 AM   #57
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I'm far more likely to make a trip if I can get there by subway or streetcar. If a bus is the only option, I rarely make the trip.
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Last edited by isaidso; August 14th, 2014 at 07:18 AM.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 07:20 AM   #58
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I'm far more likely to make a trip if I can get there by subway or LRT. If a bus is the only option, I rarely make the trip.
Yes! Those are my thoughts (and probably of most of the populace as well). Well, I mean, except for the part of "rarely making the trip" if it's by bus. I'll make it begrudgingly, but I'll make it.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 12:56 PM   #59
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Toronto's new streetcars:



QUICK STATS:

Seating: 70
Standing: 181 max (250 crush load)
Length: 30.20 metres
Width: 2.54 metres
Height: 3.84 metres
Weight: 48,200 kilograms
Max speed: 70 km/h
Cost per streetcar: $6 million
Fleet cost: $1.2 billion
Fleet size: 204 streetcars
Additional costs: $800 million (Leslie carhouse, curb cuts, wiring, and new track)

ROLLOUT SCHEDULE:

505 Dundas: Mid 2014
510 Spadina: Mid 2014
511 Bathurst: Mid 2014
509 Harbourfront: Late 2014
501 Queen: Early 2015
508 Lake Shore: Early 2015
504 King: Mid 2016
512 St. Clair: Mid 2017
502 Downtowner: Early 2018
503 Kingston Road: Early 2018
506 Carlton: Mid 2018
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Old August 14th, 2014, 01:38 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
The vast majority of light rail/streetcar systems in the US have massive traffic flows.
Yeah, really ?
So, take the example of Prague. Tch rep.
The streetcart/LRT system of this city (less than 2 000 000 inhabitants) is +or- 150 km long, 21 routes and carries 350 000 000 passengers/year.
More, there is a subway (59 km) wich takes more than 500 000 000 passengers/year.

THAT is massive flow.
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