daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 1st, 2014, 11:56 PM   #81
diablo234
Oh No He Didn't
 
diablo234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 5,297

Quote:
Originally Posted by CNB30 View Post
Hah they are all from Texas
Well I just used the ones I am most familiar with. I am sure you can find other examples as well.
diablo234 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 2nd, 2014, 03:53 AM   #82
CNB30
centralnatbankbuildingrva
 
CNB30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New York (Brooklyn)/Richmond/Philadelphia
Posts: 2,575
Likes (Received): 805

Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Well I just used the ones I am most familiar with. I am sure you can find other examples as well.
yeah good point, like Rick Scott
__________________
High speed rail=real energy independence!

A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. Its where the rich use public transportation

Feel The Bern #2016
CNB30 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2014, 04:02 AM   #83
whatsuplucas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: So Paulo
Posts: 298
Likes (Received): 143

Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_christine View Post
The hostility toward buses among light rail enthusiasts is incredible short-sighted. Most rail transit systems rely on buses to feed passengers into the rail system.

When I visit a city that is new to me, I often go out of my way to ride rail transit lines. I've never gone out of my way to ride a bus line. I fully recognize that rail lines are more interesting to ride, but the cost of building them is so high that there is no way we could expect cities to build only rail lines.
I am one of those rail enthusiasts, but I do recognize the value of buses, precisely because it is them who feed passengers into the rail system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Granted there have been a few cases where Republican GOP representatives derailed or tried to derail funding for light rail (ie Tom Delay/John Cornyn/John Culberson)
Is it because they dislike public transportation?
whatsuplucas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2014, 04:57 AM   #84
LtBk
Registered User
 
LtBk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Greater Baltimore
Posts: 3,103
Likes (Received): 3706

The GOP in general tends to dislike mass transit unless they are from more liberal areas.
__________________

CNB30 liked this post
LtBk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2014, 07:33 AM   #85
krnboy1009
Registered User
 
krnboy1009's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 1,661
Likes (Received): 169

Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
Even the difference between Canada and the US is pretty stark when it comes to public transit.

TheUS generally has this image that public transit is "dirty" and for poor people, and combo that with their extremely suburban nature that is really unfriendly to public transit and you get really low use.
Depends. Places like New York, Chicago and Washington DC, every socioeconomic classes, except the really rich, uses public transit.

Place like Atlanta, yea. The stereotype fits.
krnboy1009 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2014, 01:03 PM   #86
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

http://chasingthestreetcar.blogspot.com/

Welcome to the Game

If you live in Portland, Oregon, you probably know all about the city's great streetcar system that goes through the SW and NW neighborhoods downtown. Check out the map.

What you may NOT know is that the streetcar provides one of the great urban running games of all time. If you know how to find it.

Sure, they built the streetcar to transport people. But it's much more fun to run alongside the thing.

The game is pretty simple. You chase the streetcar. You beat the streetcar. You stay ahead of the streetcar. Humans good, machines bad.

Think of it as part scavenger hunt, part kick the can, and part hide and seek. Combined with a track workout.

Are you ready to take back the streets? The best public transit system is RUNNING! Run, o fleet-footed humans! Run!

Who? You.

Why? Because we can.

Where? Anywhere the streetcar goes.

When? As often as possible.

Ready?

Introducing...THE RULES

Of course there are no rules. It's all about anarchy. Make up your own rules. But here are a few suggestions...

1 - Stay ahead of the streetcar.

This is a matter of honor and the point of the whole game. The streetcar is a machine and, well, we're better than the machines. Show you're better. Stay ahead.

Think of John Henry. Do you like to "race against the machine"? Then by all means stay AHEAD - even just barely ahead - of the soulless machines. Flesh and blood must win out against glass and steel. Stay ahead!

How many laps around the circuit can you do and stay ahead? One? Two? Four? Aha - you'll find out!

2 - Run on the sidewalk.

Don't run in the street or get right in front of the streetcar. That makes the driver very angry . It's dangerous and will quit possibly result in your early retirement from the game and life.

3 - Watch out for pedestrians.

A lot of the time you will be flat out sprinting to beat the machines. However, in your excitement do not offend the law-abiding citizens who are on the sidewalk. Be careful. Don't hurdle over any old ladies. Be respectful. In general people will support us as the heroic underdog rebels in our quest to beat the machines - but not if you run into them.

4 - Have fun.

This one WILL be enforced. The game is so much fun you don't even realize how hard you're running. Try it, you'll like it.

More soon on game variations, special lingo, course peculiarities and of course, the points system.

Any good game has points, right?
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2014, 08:32 PM   #87
whatsuplucas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: So Paulo
Posts: 298
Likes (Received): 143



What?

(it DOES sound fun though)
whatsuplucas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2014, 03:16 AM   #88
CNB30
centralnatbankbuildingrva
 
CNB30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New York (Brooklyn)/Richmond/Philadelphia
Posts: 2,575
Likes (Received): 805

I did that in Norfolk (although light rail is harder to beat)
__________________
High speed rail=real energy independence!

A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. Its where the rich use public transportation

Feel The Bern #2016
CNB30 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2014, 01:13 PM   #89
JustinB
Registered User
 
JustinB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,633
Likes (Received): 30

Rail vs. Bus debate in a streetcar thread... Who didn't see that coming?

I'm calling bunk on that study claiming the Healthline BRT spurred development. I've been to Cleveland a number of times, and there is no way that BRT system spurred any sort of development. My guess is that development would've occurred on Euclid regardless of the BRT line.
__________________
The more valuable you perceive your time as worth, the less valuable it actually is.

CNB30 liked this post
JustinB no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2014, 01:46 AM   #90
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

From the RTA website < http://www.riderta.com/healthline/about >

$5 Billion in Economic Development and growth in the Euclid Corridor

- $62 million generated local taxes
- $180 million Cleveland State University master plan
- $500 million University Hospitals expansion
- 7.9 million square feet in commercial development
- 13,000 new jobs
- $350 million Cleveland Museum of Art project
- $506 million Cleveland Clinic Heart Center
- New MOCA landmark building
- 4,000 new residential units
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2014, 01:50 AM   #91
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

Quote:
Originally Posted by CNB30 View Post
I did that in Norfolk (although light rail is harder to beat)
You wouldn't be able to outrun the trains on the segment that parallels I-264, but the segment that snakes around on downtown streets between the Harbor Park and The Hague is painfully slow.
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2014, 02:17 AM   #92
CNB30
centralnatbankbuildingrva
 
CNB30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New York (Brooklyn)/Richmond/Philadelphia
Posts: 2,575
Likes (Received): 805

Is there even a Hague station? Anyway, the segment I ran along was from the York St station to the Bridge a few blocks down.
__________________
High speed rail=real energy independence!

A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. Its where the rich use public transportation

Feel The Bern #2016
CNB30 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2014, 03:37 AM   #93
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

Yeah, the bridge you are referring to is across the entrance channel to the Hague. I believe the channel is actually called Smith Creek. Peta is on one side and NOAA is on the other. The nearest station is York Street/Freemason.
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2014, 12:57 PM   #94
JustinB
Registered User
 
JustinB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,633
Likes (Received): 30

Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_christine View Post
From the RTA website < http://www.riderta.com/healthline/about >

$5 Billion in Economic Development and growth in the Euclid Corridor

- $62 million generated local taxes
- $180 million Cleveland State University master plan
- $500 million University Hospitals expansion
- 7.9 million square feet in commercial development
- 13,000 new jobs
- $350 million Cleveland Museum of Art project
- $506 million Cleveland Clinic Heart Center
- New MOCA landmark building
- 4,000 new residential units
And my argument stands. Development would've occurred along Euclid due to the street being remade. Even if the BRT wasn't part of the rejuvenation project, devlopment would've occured anyways.
Seems to good to be true, that a basic BRT system would be a catalyst for such development. I've ridden the HealthLine from end to end. It's nothing special other than decent frequency on a downtown corridor.
__________________
The more valuable you perceive your time as worth, the less valuable it actually is.
JustinB no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 01:45 AM   #95
JustinB
Registered User
 
JustinB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,633
Likes (Received): 30

https://www.raisethehammer.org/artic...tment_than_brt
__________________
The more valuable you perceive your time as worth, the less valuable it actually is.
JustinB no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 02:50 AM   #96
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinB View Post
And my argument stands. Development would've occurred along Euclid due to the street being remade. ...
The same issue exists with claims regarding development along streetcar lines. It can't be known that the development wouldn't have happened anyway. It also can't be known whether the transit line (BRT or Streetcar) focused development in a single corridor at the expense of neighborhoods not along the line.
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 05:51 AM   #97
whatsuplucas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: So Paulo
Posts: 298
Likes (Received): 143

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinB View Post
Interesting article. However, I found one section quite funny:

Quote:
BRT has passenger boarding stations rather than bus stops, and it runs at a high enough frequency that passengers can just show up at a station and wait for the next bus.


Where can you not do that? That's one of the things that makes me say: "Oh, America..."
whatsuplucas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 07:24 AM   #98
Innsertnamehere
insertoronto
 
Innsertnamehere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,960
Likes (Received): 680

What they mean is that its frequent enough that you don't have to look at a schedule, you just show up. Basically it means that it runs at 15 minute frequencies or better, really. Compare to a low ridership bus route which typically has 30 minutes or lower off peak frequencies, and you can see the difference.

Now of course there is obviously nothing preventing a regular bus route from running at those frequencies as well, which already occurs on the proposed Hamilton LRT.
Innsertnamehere no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 07:27 AM   #99
whatsuplucas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: So Paulo
Posts: 298
Likes (Received): 143

Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
What they mean is that its frequent enough that you don't have to look at a schedule, you just show up. Basically it means that it runs at 15 minute frequencies or better, really. Compare to a low ridership bus route which typically has 30 minutes or lower off peak frequencies, and you can see the difference.

Now of course there is obviously nothing preventing a regular bus route from running at those frequencies as well, which already occurs on the proposed Hamilton LRT.
That's what I meant! In a city where a BRT/LRT system is supposed to "make sense" (i.e., there's enough demand), regular buses shouldn't run at half-hour frequencies.
whatsuplucas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 07:48 AM   #100
Intheburbs
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Houston
Posts: 9
Likes (Received): 2

Tucson Streetcar Ridership Exceeds Expectations


Photo: AZPM

"Less than two months into its operation, the Tucson Modern Streetcar is exceeding expectations among both city officials and local businesses.

Streetcar Project Manager Shellie Ginn said that, although the initial number of riders fell in line with expectations of 3,600 passengers per day, ridership has nearly doubled since classes began at the University of Arizona.

By the first week of September, the streetcar was averaging roughly 5,000 per day, and continues to have a high volume of riders..."

https://news.azpm.org/p/bus-econ-new...since-opening/
__________________

whatsuplucas liked this post
Intheburbs no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
canada, light rail, mxico, north america, streetcars, trams, usa

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium