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Old November 29th, 2007, 05:21 PM   #81
Electrify
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRZ View Post
I've tried to tell you several times already, it does not work in dense built-up areas with narrow streets like downtown Toronto. If you have big 8-lane American roads... SURE! IT'S PERFECT! Not too many 8-lane roads in Toronto; University, Don Mills, and parts of Lakeshore are the only ones that immediately come to mind - one has a subway already, another is slated for LRT, and a third is along an existing heavy rail commuter corridor and on its western end, where it is smaller, has LRT already, while the part that doesn't is covered by a highway that makes a monorail in that area impossible, not that it would matter as people would have a monorail blotting their waterfront over their dead body. Monorails along waterfronts don't scream "Toronto" at all, surface LRT along waterfronts does though, for historical reasons.

It will also stick out like a sore thumb in low-density areas and easily be considered an eyesore. Elevated LRT would be the same thing. You think the SRT is considered "wonderful" by anybody? It isn't. It's elevated portion is not popular.

These things would work in hydro corridors, and suburban arteries such as Mavis in Mississauga and Bovaird in Brampton. However, the ridership on such streets would suck - they're designed to be places nobody wants to go as a pedestrian, purely car oriented.

Major streets that are not "walled off" from neighborhoods, like Hurontario, and Dundas, should not be considered suitable for monorail, they will not "mesh" with the built form and will encounter viscious opposition.
And I've tried to tell you guys that I don't think it is that much of an eyesore, much less than an elevated LRT would be. If you feel it is, then fine. Pics of both setups have been posted numerous times, so people can decide for themselves if they feel it is that ugly.

As for the SRT, its ugliness comes from the fact that there is virtually nothing around the stations more than anything else. If they developed somethings around the stations, then it could be a much better line. Instead, the vast majority of it seems designed for people to drive to and nothing more.

But hey, if spending billions and decades to build a subway is the best, then fine. Just hope that a right winged government doesn't come in and cancel the construction is all. Or you can always build a tram-like LRT through city streets, which will really get people out of their cars as it has to run slowly for pedestrians and speed limits. Just pray a car accident doesn't block the tracks is all.
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You are genius too Electrify, never would have thought of this if not for your thread.
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Old November 30th, 2007, 03:46 AM   #82
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The main theoretical advantage of monorails is lower visual bulk. Unfortunately, in America, handicap-accessibility and building codes impose requirements that completely destroy any real advantage a monorail might have. You're left with a system that's as expensive to build and visually bulky as elevated light/heavy rail, but slower.

The Seattle monorail was built before those requirements were imposed. The Las Vegas monorail was built after. Disney's monorail was built before them AND runs entirely on private property where there aren't pedestrians below. Thanks to the pedestrian walkway between the guideways, Las Vegas' monorail has a support structure that's as big and bulky as one for light (or heavy) rail would have been.

Monorails are cool, but in America they've effectively been legislated out of existence.
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Old November 30th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #83
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Quote:
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From those pics, the light rail looks MUCH larger than the monorail pics, with the exception of the Seattle concept one. Not too sure what that pic is supposed to be of (station perhaps?), but here are some pics of Seattle's current monorail:

While it is good to see Seattle making light rail work for them, it would have been cool to see their current monorail system upgraded into a city wide transit network.
That pic was the normal guideway. Rules and laws have changed significantly since 1962 - any monorail built today in the US would look about the same as a light rail, because you have to be able to walk along the guideway.
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Old November 30th, 2007, 05:25 AM   #84
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Stupid PC safety rules
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You are genius too Electrify, never would have thought of this if not for your thread.
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Old November 30th, 2007, 05:29 AM   #85
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Stupid PC safety rules
It's called provisions for evacuation, genius. It's also for worker safety (maintenance)
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Old November 30th, 2007, 06:53 AM   #86
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It's called provisions for evacuation, genius. It's also for worker safety (maintenance)
Hmmm....KL doesnt have the safety walkways...which obviously saved them some cost...and created a different appearance for the monorail....

Funny tho, it has been proven that safety walkways are unnecessary...

And here is another way to evacuate in KL

Cheers, m
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Old November 30th, 2007, 05:31 PM   #87
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Hmmm....KL doesnt have the safety walkways...which obviously saved them some cost...and created a different appearance for the monorail....

Funny tho, it has been proven that safety walkways are unnecessary...
While that is certainly funny, it does not prove at all that safety walkways are unnecessary. Illegal use of infrastructure to flee police does not certify its viability as a safe means of evacuation of train-loads of people at all.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 08:16 AM   #88
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I recall some Japanese monorail also do not have safety walkways. Instead, the would evacuate any stranded monorail using another monorail where there is an emergency ramp that would connect a monorail to another.But I dun think t\this works with KL monorail coz the ends dun have any doors like Japanese monorails.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 09:12 AM   #89
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Just a video of KL monorail

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Old December 1st, 2007, 12:23 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRZ View Post
While that is certainly funny, it does not prove at all that safety walkways are unnecessary. Illegal use of infrastructure to flee police does not certify its viability as a safe means of evacuation of train-loads of people at all.
please dont tell me you took ithe use of the word proven seriously TRZ... perhaps I should have written it like this: "proven" so that the sarcasm and humour showed?



Obviously what happens in KL isnt working to North American safety standards anyways.

Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestcat View Post
I recall some Japanese monorail also do not have safety walkways. Instead, the would evacuate any stranded monorail using another monorail where there is an emergency ramp that would connect a monorail to another.But I dun think t\this works with KL monorail coz the ends dun have any doors like Japanese monorails.
It would be interesting to see what the KL Monorail procedures are...aside from what we saw in that photo....perhaps they have another monorail pull up along side and lay 2 wooden planks down between each carriage?

Cheers, m
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Old December 1st, 2007, 12:52 PM   #91
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please dont tell me you took ithe use of the word proven seriously TRZ... perhaps I should have written it like this: "proven" so that the sarcasm and humour showed?



Obviously what happens in KL isnt working to North American safety standards anyways.
Text is misleading, but with some forumers' ideas on here, it takes a toll on your sanity
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Old December 1st, 2007, 04:51 PM   #92
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These images posted by UrbanBen show a section of the Central Link viaduct that is 60 feet in the air:





The following image shows a section of the viaduct that is at a more normal height above the ground:



The viaduct is about 26 feet (8 m) wide. The shallowest segments are 7 feet (2.1 m) deep. This does not include railings or knee walls for noise suppression.

Last edited by greg_christine; December 1st, 2007 at 05:09 PM.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 05:09 PM   #93
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The following image posted by UrbanBen was developed by critics of the Seattle Monorail Project:



The following image shows Cascadia Monorail's actual design proposal:



Having the guideway beams at different heights allowed the station to be more compact with the platforms on separate levels. The controversy over the guideway configuration led to a decision to adopt a conventional side-by-side guideway beam configuration:



The Seattle Monorail Project would have used Hitachi Standard Type trains. The guideway beams were about 33.5” (0.85 m) wide by 79” (2 m) deep. The bottom 20” (0.5 m) of the guideway beams were actually cableways.

The existing Seattle Center/World’s Fair monorail has guideway beams that are 35.4” wide (0.9 m) by 59” (1.5 m) deep. The following image shows the guideway:



An aborted bid for the Seattle Monorail Project that would have used trains built by Bombardier featured guideway beams that are 27” (0.7 m) wide and about 5’ (1.5 m) deep. The guideway beams would have been similar in size to those in Las Vegas:

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Old December 1st, 2007, 05:26 PM   #94
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One of the most attractive aspects of monorail operation is how quiet the trains are. One of the most remarkable demonstrations of this is at the Walt Disney World resort where the trains are routed through the atrium of one of the resort hotels. Guests eat meals in the restaurant and shop in the lobby as trains operate close enough to be hit with a rubber band. It can be a challenge to take photos as there is no noticable noise to indicate the approach of a train:



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Old December 1st, 2007, 06:36 PM   #95
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Their quiet operation has less to do with being monorails than having rubber tires. Miami's Metromover is just as quiet. I don't remember for sure, but I think Montreal's subway was pretty quiet, too.

It's a pity that suspended monorails are utterly taboo in the US (since there's no conceivable way to make them code-compliant). A system like Aerobus would be perfect in cities like Miami as a way to expand the "reach" of individual Metrorail stations... say, running a single guideway above one of the sidewalks (sharing support columns with the street lights, and maybe the power lines) perpendicular to the Metrorail stracks for 2-3 miles each way, with a single vehicle on each segment that just runs back and forth all day between the Metrorail station and stations .3-.5 miles apart.
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Old December 3rd, 2007, 11:27 AM   #96
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Monorail-Scomi 2nd Gen Debut

Quote:
From Scomi Group Bhd.





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Old December 3rd, 2007, 12:25 PM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
I'm torn between two possible things I can say in response to this...

A) Captain's log, stardate ....

or

B) On my mark...
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Engage!
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Old December 3rd, 2007, 01:38 PM   #98
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Quote:
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Monorail-Scomi 2nd Gen Debut



From Scomi Group Bhd.





Thank you for posting these images! I've searched the Scomi website for information about their new monorail design and have not found anything other than a news release. Based on the above images, I assume Scomi has a webpage on the monorail somewhere. Can you provide a link?
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Old December 3rd, 2007, 02:14 PM   #99
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Good to see this is "The Official Thread".

I have nothing against monorails, but show me a monorail system that has developed ... that is, extended ...
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Old December 3rd, 2007, 02:57 PM   #100
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Chongquing maybe?
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