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Old February 10th, 2006, 05:49 PM   #681
Rascacielos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BVictor1
It's for 1600 Museum Park



As mentioned below, it will be coming before the planning commission next week. It's only 1 highrise though. At least as far as I know. I'll post more information after the meeting as to whether there's more than one highrise for that particular application.
I don't think the notice I saw is for 1600 Museum Park. It's posted on the office building on the west side of Prairie. I think this is a separte development altogether.
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Old February 10th, 2006, 06:05 PM   #682
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i dont remember seeing this one before. interesting design. not sure if it realy works for me.
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Old February 11th, 2006, 04:47 AM   #683
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How big is the office building they are replacing to build 1600 Museum Park? I'm assuming its just a few stories.
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Old February 11th, 2006, 05:42 AM   #684
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wickedestcity
interesting design. not sure if it realy works for me.
I think this design is very beatiful in its suddle lines progressing outward from the building. It seems to be a very modern and sophisticated departure without looking as though it will be outdated in 5 years.
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Old February 11th, 2006, 07:39 PM   #685
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Going back to the helipad

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...-newslocal-hed

Natarus calls for more heliports in city
Published February 11, 2006

Chicago's decision to build a heliport downtown should be expanded to other sites, an alderman influential on transportation issues said Friday

Ald. Burton Natarus (42nd), a longtime advocate of building more helicopter landing and takeoff pads in the city for use by emergency personnel and commercial shuttle operations, praised the Daley administration's move to open the Chicago Helistop this spring on the lakefront just south of Navy Pier.

The Tribune reported Friday that the helistop, large enough to handle one helicopter at a time, has won approval from the state and the Federal Aviation Administration. It will be used primarily by police, fire and military helicopters, but it also will be made available to companies to fly employees to and from downtown.
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Old February 11th, 2006, 08:53 PM   #686
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Old February 11th, 2006, 09:07 PM   #687
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^ It's good to see something like that reutilized instead of demolished
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Old February 11th, 2006, 10:28 PM   #688
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^ Yea, I would hate to see North Pier demolished (same with the Post office or C.C.Hospital).

As far as the heliports I think they are a great idea. Cities like Tokyo, Sao Paulo(especially), and New York make good use of them. Some VP's and CEO's just don't want to take the EL, Metro, or dive on the Kennedy from Lake Forest or Barrigton and unfortuanatley you have to cater to them to attract those types on a personal basis. Just as long as they keep away from the flying over downtown and have strict security measures on commercial helicopters dealing with both pilots and riders.
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Old February 11th, 2006, 11:14 PM   #689
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Interesting, I always assumed River East Plaza was condos. I hope they keep most of it office space because I dont forsee more office development in that area for a long time (if ever).
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Old February 12th, 2006, 01:37 PM   #690
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nothing really new, but an ok article...

http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-down12.html

News
Downtown becoming a home show
February 12, 2006

BY DAVID ROEDER AND SANDRA GUY Staff Reporters


Fresh from a record year for condominium sales, downtown Chicago is proving irresistible for retailers more accustomed to building near suburban rooftops. They're now scrambling for land within the city's man-made forest.

Each high-rise stands as a treasure of disposable income to the big-volume grocers, hardware stores and discounters who are staking claims on the downtown dollar. The retailers' arrival signals a new phase in the central city's evolution as a place where people live, not just work.

Four large-scale stores -- three groceries and a Home Depot -- plan openings by 2007. The size of the Home Depot, planned for the southeast corner of Roosevelt and Jefferson, will rival what the hardware chain builds in the suburbs. The groceries are Dominick's, Jewel and Whole Foods.
They will join other stores that have opened on downtown's fringes and topped sales expectations. One example: the Gordon's Ace Hardware at 440 N. Orleans in River North. John Venhuizen, director of business development at Ace Hardware, said the store beat the typical first-year performance for an Ace Hardware by 25 percent. The store is three times the size that Ace, a co-op chain, typically builds in a city neighborhood.

The success of a Target on Roosevelt Road has induced other big-box retailers to scout the territory. Costco, a warehouse club that competes with grocery stores, wants a site in the South Loop for a huge 135,000-square-foot operation, said a report by the property brokerage Mid-America Development Partners.

A Costco real estate spokesman could not be reached for comment.

12,000 new homes over next 3 years



Downtown is changing at a dizzying pace. The central city, from the Gold Coast down through McCormick Place, logged a record 8,162 home sales in 2005, said a report issued last week by Appraisal Research Counselors Ltd. The total is nearly a third higher than the 2004 sales figure the firm reported.

Gail Lissner, vice president of Appraisal Research, said the brisk sales have caused developers to plot more high-rises due in 2008. In the pipeline are about 4,000 new homes annually for the next three years, she said.

That also would be a record pace. Whether the projects are realized depends on factors including the course of interest rates and job growth.

But the projections show that, barring economic calamity, the population of the city's core will continue to rise. Census data crunched by the city's Planning Department show that within the area bounded by Division, Roosevelt, Halsted and Lake Michigan, the population has increased from 46,820 in 1970 to 70,137 as of the 2000 census.

Housing starts indicate the census number should be steaming past 90,000 by 2010.
With that prosperity comes maturity, and a growing concern that downtown's changes aren't altogether positive. Its new character as a bedroom community, albeit with the bedrooms stacked high, promises clashes with its clamorous and gritty side.

Politicians adjusting

Think of last week's City Council vote ordering street musicians to cut the volume of their performances, and banning them from part of the Michigan Avenue shopping district. Ald. Burton Natarus (42nd) advocated the crackdown to answer complaints from residents who couldn't stand the constant noise filtering up to their living rooms.

Also, Mayor Daley has proposed a crackdown on bars that hold the city's late-hour liquor license until 4 a.m. More than a third of those bars are in Natarus' ward, which includes the downtown and Near North Side.

Daley wants to require the bars to hire security and add outside cameras and lighting, all to curb complaints that the businesses spawn crime and general nuisance in the wee hours.

"People want to sleep at night,'' Natarus told the Sun-Times, adding, "We're getting more and more people living downtown. We have to start making these types of adjustments."

Certain things were tolerated when downtown's identity was defined by working and partying. But increasingly, its priorities look more like a suburb's with a focus on police protection, taxation and services such as schools and parks.

School buses a harbinger of change


A major downtown development called Lakeshore East is striving for the well-rounded neighborhood effect by including a school and playground in its acreage north of Grant Park.

From his perch in the 400 E. Randolph building, Walter Stunard can see how downtown has gone domestic. He notices it in the school buses that now visit the islandlike group of skyscrapers on that street early each morning.

Stunard, a real estate agent at Rubloff Inc., himself grew up in a downtown with fewer families in its midst. Today, he's raising two children in the same place, and they join about 20 compatriots each morning waiting for the bus to Ogden School.

Other buses cruise the block to pick up children going to private schools.

"This has become an excellent location for many families,'' Stunard said. "You've basically got a park across the street from your building'' and a short walk to Lake Michigan.

Grocery shopping used to be less convenient, he said, but now it's relatively easy to drive to the stores on the Near South, West and North sides. Stunard said he's pleased that a Treasure Island, with more boutique appeal than Jewel or Dominick's, will open near his building.

Loss of workers can hurt businesses



For other parts of downtown, residential growth can be a paradox. As a street loses jobs and replaces them with homes, there can be less life on the street, hurting merchants who expected something better.

Chuck Levi, proprietor of one of the oldest businesses in the Loop, the Iwan Reis & Co. cigar store at 19 S. Wabash, has watched as old office buildings around him have been scrubbed of grime and reborn with condos or hotel rooms.

"When you get these conversions, they can take a lot of people off the street," Levi said. "An office building creates a lot of foot traffic, hundreds of people every day who work there and visit, and obviously these people have totally disappeared."
Levi is the fourth-generation owner of a store that dates from 1857. He said he's seen little new business attributable to residential growth. The expansion he's noticed has a surprising source.

"Our mail-order business is doing more with people in the suburbs that have had their offices moved out of the Loop," he said.

Levi has learned that for some merchants, residential growth downtown can be a broken promise. In part, that's because many of the new condos are not occupied by full-time residents.

Some units -- insiders estimate 20 percent or more -- are sold to investors, people who hope to cash in on a quick resale. Others are sold to wealthy people who use them sporadically or to retirees who spend the winters someplace warmer.

It's a fact of life that doesn't hurt local governments, which still get tax revenue from condos whether they are occupied or not. But it can mean less benefit than meets the eye for a cleaners or a restaurant that expected a neighborhood trade.

Levi's store is on a block of low-rise buildings that recall the Loop of the 1920s. But the block, part of the Jewelers Row landmark district, will soon be riven by a construction project that will add a 71-story building behind three buildings immediately south of Iwan Reis.

Is Levi bitter about that? Hardly. The Northbrook resident likes the idea of having a place next door to go home to on occasion. "I'm thinking of buying there myself," he said.

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Old February 12th, 2006, 06:30 PM   #691
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Also, to add to the artilce, here is a map of future retail, schools, other businesses, homes...
__________________

for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old February 12th, 2006, 08:03 PM   #692
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I dont agree with the boundaries of downtown. North Avenue should be a border-the Gold Coast is a residential part of downtown. If another city outside of NYC had the Gold Coast, they surely would include it as downtown.
Im guessing that is another 30,000 or 40,000 people right there, at least.

Halsted? That leaves out West Gate, another residential downtown area. I would say Ashland, or Damen. Most people I know include the Medical Center as the downtown area. So many people work there.

Roosevelt? That leaves out all the growth in Central Station and beyond.
It has to be 55. America's (or the Worlds) biggest convention center outside of downtown? Thats sounds stupid.

I wonder what the REAL numbers for downtown are. Im guessing its close to 150,000 in 2006. That being said, it is impressive that 70,000 live within those limited borders in 2000.
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Old February 12th, 2006, 08:04 PM   #693
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^
I totally agree with you.
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for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old February 12th, 2006, 09:40 PM   #694
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Pretty cool article. It'll be really interesting to see downtown's transformation into a residential area. Hopefully the change will be for the better.
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Old February 12th, 2006, 09:51 PM   #695
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I agree with you too, LA. Once you pass those parameters, then you no longer feel like you're actually in downtown.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 10:47 PM   #696
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Wasn't sure where to post this.

For those of you who are interested, there is a Media Player video of the next (and final) phase of redevelopment of the former Cabrini Green site. It seems to maintain good density as well as fitting into the streetgrid quite well as opposed to the earlier generation of "inward-oriented" developments.

Click below:

http://www.thecha.org/housingdev/cab...een_homes.html
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Old February 20th, 2006, 07:19 AM   #697
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Re: CHA redevelopment. I'm not crazy about the fences surrounding the townhouses. Other than that it looks OK, but nothing special.
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Old February 20th, 2006, 04:23 PM   #698
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According to ChicagoArchitecture.info there is a new skyscraper in the works. They dont have any renderings as of yet, but its called Aqua or something like that and they're aiming for 80 - 85 stories. Does anyone else know anything more about this?
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Old February 20th, 2006, 05:10 PM   #699
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroLover80
According to ChicagoArchitecture.info there is a new skyscraper in the works. They dont have any renderings as of yet, but its called Aqua or something like that and they're aiming for 80 - 85 stories. Does anyone else know anything more about this?
Check out Frankie's info on the Lakeshore East thread; it looks like the "Aqua" is the Gang building slated for the site across from the Fairmont Hotel.
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Old February 20th, 2006, 05:35 PM   #700
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Anyway...

John Buck is looking to create another LEED office tower. I think we've heard little snippets on this project, but lets see what happens.

Eco-friendly builders starting to grow
February 20, 2006
BY DAVID ROEDER Business Reporter

http://www.suntimes.com/output/busin...n-green20.html

In Chicago office development, "going green" has a double meaning. It's about environmental friendliness, yes, but especially the color of money.

Builders of offices have discovered that with a little thought and upfront expense, their structures can get an ecological seal of approval. They say that tenants with large appetites for space, the law and accounting firms whose leases usually launch such buildings, are starting to demand it.
...

Swanson said Buck is again going for the gold rating for a potential office building at 155 N. Wacker that it currently is shopping to users. "It's getting to the point where if you're not LEED, you won't have the anchor tenants you need to start the building," he said.
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