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Old June 11th, 2005, 09:12 PM   #61
BVictor1
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Originally Posted by colemonkee
Won't people who live in those upper floors get annoyed by those lights? By the way, that's a pretty kick-ass view you have.

That's what curtains are for. I think that those are some of the penhoouse units.
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Old June 12th, 2005, 12:39 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by Chi_Coruscant
Condo plan would raze McCormick birthplace

By Jeanette Almada
Special to the Tribune
Published June 10, 2005


Preservationists seemed resigned Thursday to the demolition of the Streeterville birthplace of longtime Chicago Tribune editor and publisher Col. Robert R. McCormick to make way for a condo and retail tower.

The Chicago Plan Commission approved the 51-story building last month as a planned development on Ontario Street, just east of Michigan Avenue. Developed by Monaco Development, it would have 160 condominiums from the 16th floor up, retail space in the basement and on the ground and second floors, plus parking for 180 cars in between, according to Kathy Caisley, a project manager for the city's Department of Planning and Development.

The development site is 148-158 E. Ontario St., according to the Planning Department, though some of the five buildings on the site may have dual addresses. Caisley said Monaco will demolish all the buildings. Officials from Monaco declined to comment about the project.

McCormick was born in 1880 in the gabled-roof rowhouse at 150 E. Ontario St. The Illini Bar now occupies the building's ground floor.

David Bahlman, executive director of the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois, said, "We have heard some rumblings about [the planned demolition], but we are not taking any action."

Another preservation group held out more hope, however.

"We are not trying to stop the project, we are just trying to save one building at the west edge of the development site," said Michael Moran, vice president of Preservation Chicago.

The preservation advocacy organization says it has talked with Planning Department Commissioner Denise Casalino and also with the department's Landmarks Division about saving the building.

"The city has not expressed support for our position and has not sought preservation for the building," Moran said. "We are exploring options ... and feel that the development can still be built while saving the westernmost building, which from our standpoint is an attractive slice of Chicago history."

McCormick, who died in 1955, "was an eccentric, but he was our eccentric," Moran said. "Later, the building was used as a key club during the speak-easy days, and eventually became a club called the Key Club.

"It is a question of how aggressive we are going to be about saving buildings that reflect our history. Every brick in this building is original, except one [that replaced a brick] embedded in the Tribune Tower, and we think it is wrong if that embedded brick is the only one from this building to remain."

That view, however, is not shared by the city.

"It has been suggested by some that it should be landmarked, but it is not an orange-rated building [highest on the city's endangered list], does not look anything like it did when he [McCormick] was born there, was altered significantly in the 1920s," said Constance Buscemi, spokesman for the Landmarks Division of the Planning Department. "And we don't believe that it warrants landmarking in light of all those factors."

Businesses occupying the 0.29-acre site include two popular restaurants: Bice and O'Neil's bar and grill.

The Plan Commission approved the project May 19. Monaco negotiated a density bonus with city officials that allows it to build more units than zoning laws would normally permit.

In return, Monaco agreed to donate $1.6 million to the Chicago Department of Housing's Affordable Housing Fund and also agreed to several building setbacks, according to Caisley.

Monaco has to present final details to the Planning Department before obtaining a building permit, said Caisley, who stressed that the proposal would not have to go back to the commission for final approval.

The only objections expressed to the commission last month came from a member of the Streeterville Organization of Active Residents, who told commissioners that its members worry about potential problems from heavy traffic on St. Clair Street and plans to eventually open a sidewalk cafe on Ontario, where the sidewalk is narrow.
For some reason i'm very dissapointed by this project. Yes it's yet another tower to add to our long list in chicago, but it seems like, and especially in the case of this project, that we destroy some of the city's character and neighborhood character. In this project they will be destroying non residential former row homes. They are some of the last surviving examples of how life use to be east of Michigan Avenue. I think in order to maintian some sort of neighborhood character, especially in neighborhood like Streeterville lacking one, at least some older buildings must exist. How many of these towers do we need anyways?? especially in Streeterville. These buildings they're destorying are probably one of the only normal sized lots remaining in the area. Though from the Sky this tower will be elegant, at stree level it will be far off from the charm of the those row homes. For god sakes even in Midtown they manage to save buildings like these, they at least know something about streetlevel charm!!!! This buildng just isn't worth it to me.
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Old June 13th, 2005, 12:03 AM   #63
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Does anyone have a picture of 150 East Ontario? I couldn't find one on google.
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Old June 13th, 2005, 12:10 AM   #64
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Here you go... 150 East Ontario.

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Old June 13th, 2005, 12:12 AM   #65
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Time for some random progress shots of Prentice. I'm not sure if this is where I posted the few other times that I took pics of the hospital, but, I couldn't find a dedicated thread, so, here goes







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Old June 15th, 2005, 01:00 AM   #66
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Old June 15th, 2005, 01:12 AM   #67
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I was looking for pics of 150 East Ontario as it is today. Does anyone feel the loss of this building is worth mourning or not?
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Old June 15th, 2005, 01:16 AM   #68
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I think all of Northwestern's Boul Mich buildings are really solid. The facades of the hospital buildings are particularly well-articulated. But the Evanston campus is another story. I heard a while back that Northwestern maintains a policy of hiring only local architecture firms. Can anyone confirm or deny this? What would be the point of this? As UofC has built interesting buildings of late with the services of world-renowned architects (e.g. new B-school--R. Vinoly, Ratner Athletic Center--C Pelli) NU's building projects seem to wallow in obscurity.

BTW, the new Prentiss reminds me a bit of the new Comer Children's Hospital at UofC. I'm not sure who designed Comer, but I think it too is a stellar addition to campus.
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Old June 15th, 2005, 06:03 AM   #69
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The area of "The Heritage" that is illuminated now is the two floors of penthouse that Oprah has purchased. Just kidding, we heard all sorts of celebrities were moving in while building Heritage. I know Daley is really moving in, but we also heard Ashton Kutcher and Oprah mentioned a few times.
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Old June 15th, 2005, 06:09 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayosthery
The area of "The Heritage" that is illuminated now is the two floors of penthouse that Oprah has purchased. Just kidding, we heard all sorts of celebrities were moving in while building Heritage. I know Daley is really moving in, but we also heard Ashton Kutcher and Oprah mentioned a few times.
LOL, actually what celebrities actually did buy a place? I know that Chicago isn't a celebrity-oriented town, but certainly it has its share of property owners
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Old June 16th, 2005, 10:21 PM   #71
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Old June 17th, 2005, 12:04 AM   #72
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^Awesome.

But I wish somebody would actually start selling something, provide a rendering, or something. We've been hearing about development here for years. It won't amount to anything till somebody finally breaks ground
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Old June 17th, 2005, 02:20 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by Chi_Coruscant
More South Loop condos planned
By Alby Gallun (www.chicagobusiness.com)
Roszak/ADC has signed a contract to buy the development site, currently a surface parking lot, and plans to close on the purchase in August, said Thomas Roszak, the firm’s founder and president.
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Old June 17th, 2005, 05:25 AM   #74
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LIGHTING-FEST 2005 CONTINUES!!!

In case anyone hasn't figured this out yet, I'm a big slut for theatrical lighting on skyscrapers. So, imagine my surprise when, for the FOURTH time in a week, I was greeted with a tasty little surprise outside my window tonight. First, it was the lights highlighting the columns atop the Heritage; then 2 Prudential flipped the power-switch back on after a two month dark-age; a few nights ago, the Heritage debuted some of the lighting (perhaps all of it, I suppose) that will be featured on its north facade (second picture in this post); and then tonight, MDA City Apartments (175 N. Wabash) turned on their own switch for the first time ever (first picture below). Subtle. Tasteful. Delicious!

175 N. Wabash featuring new theatrical lighting.


Five lights now adorn select balconies on the slender north facade of the Heritage.
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Old June 19th, 2005, 09:05 AM   #75
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Just an update for anyone that cares (probably nobody besides me :P)... there are now seven lights on the north facade of the Heritage as opposed to the five shown in the picture above. Perhaps they will finally finish at least one thing on this tower.
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Old June 19th, 2005, 02:25 PM   #76
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Condos feel at home on Michigan Avenue
`Absolutely prime residential corridor' evolves as vintage office buildings become residences

By John Handley and Sharon Stangenes
Tribune staff reporters
Published June 19, 2005

Is Michigan Avenue, the fabled street of world-class shopping, trendy restaurants and office buildings instead becoming Chicago's version of New York's Park Avenue?

One look at the number of vintage office buildings being converted into condominiums and it begins to look that way.

If the landmark Wrigley Building, one of the most famous buildings on what is a world-famous stretch of street, eventually goes condo, it would join stalwarts such as the Palmolive Building and the old Britannica Center that will have replaced office credenzas with two bedrooms, a bathroom and a room with a view.

In all about 5,000 residential units now exist along Boul Mich from Oak Street to Roosevelt Road.

And that number is expected to increase.

"Michigan Avenue has evolved as an absolutely prime residential corridor," declares Gail Lissner, vice president of Appraisal Research Counselors in Chicago. "Even people who don't know Chicago have heard of Michigan Avenue. It has worldwide recognition. The location can't be beat."

Those drawn to the boulevard tend to be a different breed. "These people want to be where it's happening," Lissner said. "They don't want quiet, tree-lined streets."

Consider the Kurdins of Ohio. The couple visited the city 10 or 12 times last year and decided to buy a second home here rather than Florida.

"I grew up in New York, but the shopping is better in Chicago. The Magnificent Mile, Oak Street is so centralized. We have our favorite restaurants," said Jan Kurdin, 42, who with her husband, Howard, 45, bought a two-bedroom condo at Metropolitan Tower, 310 S. Michigan Ave. "We bought a fun place in Chicago to go where we can play."

James Kinney, president of Rubloff Residential Properties in Chicago, estimates that 20 percent to 30 percent of buyers on Michigan Avenue are like the Kurdins, part-time residents.

"There are a lot of empty-nesters selling their suburban houses and coming downtown," Kinney said.

Prices at new developments are pushing up to $1,000 a square foot, Kinney said. As for older condos, he said a two-bedroom apartment at Water Tower Place is $1 million-plus.

A driving force behind Michigan Avenue's rise as a corridor of condos are low interest rates and the willingness of people to plunk down what in another era might be considered huge amounts of money on residences.

Many of the older office buildings, especially those along South Michigan Avenue, also play into the conversions. No longer efficient as office space, they are better suited for conversion into residential units, said Bob Horner of Monroe Building Development Corp.

He and partner Ibrahim Shihadeh plan to convert the office building at 104 S. Michigan Ave. into 96 residential units, at prices from $200,000 to $4 million. Built in 1911, the structure is across the street from the Art Institute of Chicago.

"Millennium Park has accelerated the residential development of Michigan Avenue," Horner added.

Jerry James, principal in Edward R. James Partners LLC, says North Michigan Avenue "is a premier location, but no land is available."

As a result, James has proposed building a 64-story structure with 240 units in back of the Fourth Presbyterian Church, across the street from the John Hancock Center.

"We have filed with the Plan Commission and now are waiting," said James, who noted that the project has been opposed by Ald. Burton Natarus (42nd).

James said his building's smaller units will be around 1,100 square feet, aimed at people who want a place to stay for weekend visits, to larger permanent residences priced at $1 million or more.

Conversions gain cost edge

"As residential prices go higher, it's more economically feasible to convert the old office buildings on Michigan Avenue," said Keith Giles, principal in Frankel & Giles Real Estate, which converted the vintage office building at 888 S. Michigan Ave. into 36 condos.

"Millennium Park has become an international draw, so it's a major advantage being across from it," Giles added.

Louis D. D'Angelo, president of Metropolitan Properties of Chicago, is the developer of Metropolitan Tower, 310 S. Michigan Ave., a building known for its distinctive blue light. Built as the Straus Building in 1924, to many Chicagoans it is the Britannica Center because for years it was the headquarters for Encyclopaedia Britannica.

The 243-unit conversion began sales in 2004 of the one-bedroom to penthouse units with prices ranging from about $300,000 to $2 million. It is about 40 percent sold.

The buyers are largely empty-nesters who like to walk to work and live near the city's cultural opportunities, D'Angelo said. "We are having more out-of-state folks than we thought," he said. Buyers are about evenly split between city and suburban buyers.

The developer also plans to redevelop the former Karpen Building at 318 S. Michigan Ave., which is now vacant. The project will be called the Richelieu.

In 1997, D'Angelo redeveloped the McCormick Building, which includes the Residences of 330 S. Michigan.

"We sold 78 units in 4 1/2 months," he recalls. Those condos are on the top six floors of the building, which still has 14 floors of commercial space.

D'Angelo credits the city's investment in infrastructure--the museum campus, trees and flowers and the success of Millennium Park--as well as escalating congestion and high development costs north of the river for the spurt of condo projects along South Michigan Avenue.

In addition, the stretch designated as Historic Michigan Boulevard in 2002 has forced builders and developers to think about residential rather than commercial uses.

"The challenge for the developers and the city is to be creative with adaptive reuse as the office market moves west and the residential moves east," he said.

Wrigley a famed name

If the Wrigley Building eventually turns condo, it would easily become one of the most famous home addresses in Chicago, real estate executives said.

Rubloff's Kinney said construction of Trump Tower in back of the Wrigley Building will energize everything around it.

"The Wrigley Building could be an exciting place to live, but it might be expensive to maintain its terra cotta facade," Kinney said.

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Old June 19th, 2005, 07:55 PM   #77
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...ck=1&cset=true

Will Wrigley Building turn high-end condo?

Future of Chicago icon in question as growing corporate giant looks at options for office space


By Thomas A. Corfman
Tribune staff reporter
Published June 19, 2005


Chicago business icon Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co., whose renowned namesake building is an architectural gem, is studying its long-term real estate needs, including a move from its historic headquarters building, the Chicago Tribune has learned.

If the company decides to pull up stakes for another location in the city--unthinkable even a few years ago--one likely scenario is that the Wrigley Building at Michigan Avenue and the Chicago River would eventually be turned into luxury condominiums, real estate sources said.

Wrigley spokesman Christopher Perille said the chances were "remote" that the maker of chewing gum would move from the prominent structure. He also said the concept of a residential condominium conversion was "way out there."

The Chicago office of real estate firm CB Richard Ellis Inc. is conducting the study for Wrigley, which has made some acquisitions in recent months and is apparently outgrowing the terra cotta classic, where it has been based for more than 75 years.

Perille declined to confirm the study. "On an ongoing basis we work with different consultants to look at real estate options because our business is growing."

He added: "We have deep roots in Chicago and the Wrigley Building, and I don't think that's changing."

Awash in bright lights at night, the Wrigley Building, with its gleaming white facade, is one of the city's biggest tourist attractions.

But the company's space review reflects two large influences that are reshaping the downtown Chicago real estate market: the residential redevelopment of older office buildings, particularly those in premiere locations; and the demands of large businesses for the newest office space that they deem better suited to their business needs.

Several older office buildings--including other famous Michigan Avenue structures like the Palmolive Building and the Carbon & Carbide Building--outlived their usefulness as office buildings and have been converted for other uses.

The Palmolive Building, which once housed the headquarters of Playboy Enterprises, is now all condos. The Carbide & Carbon Building at 230 N. Michigan Ave. is now a Hard Rock Hotel.

In addition, the Wrigley Building is next door to the construction site of Donald Trump's hotel/condo tower, which has drawn significant numbers of condo buyers to the area and increased interest in more condo development nearby.

"It's beautiful, but it does not appear to be terribly viable as an office building," said Bruce Miller, managing director with Jones Lang LaSalle Inc., who handled the 2002 sale of a Michigan Avenue icon, the Palmolive Building, to a residential developer.

No end to condo conversions

"There seems to be no end in sight for these high-quality buildings up and down Michigan Avenue that are being converted," he added.

The company's potential move also underscores how William Wrigley Jr., who became chief executive in 1999 and chairman last year, is putting his stamp on the venerable company.

Once stodgy and content with just its main gum products, Wrigley has been trying to grow bigger and more diverse through acquisitions.

"Bill Wrigley is re-examining the old family assumptions of every aspect of the business," said Steven Fifield, chief executive of the Chicago-based development firm that bears his name.

The Wrigley Building is actually two towers separated by a courtyard, with addresses of 400 and 410 N. Michigan Ave. The company now occupies nearly 227,000 square feet, almost half of the 453,400-square foot development. Five years ago, the company had 159,000 square feet.

The rest of the space is leased to small companies, such as investment firms and advertising agencies.

While CB Richard Ellis assesses its long-range needs, Wrigley is also looking for short-term additional office space near the headquarters.

That search for about 60,000 square feet of space is being handled by another real estate firm, Transwestern Commercial Services, Perille confirmed.

Wrigley would lease that space for between three and five years. For specific projects, Wrigley has in recent years leased short-term office space outside of the Wrigley Building, he noted.

But the current short-term space is partly needed to accommodate Wrigley's expected acquisition of the LifeSavers and Altoids candy brands from Kraft Foods Inc. for $1.48 billion, he said.

The deal, a sign of Wrigley's break from the past, would allow the company to expand its product line to compete with other candy companies like Hershey Foods Corp., which Wrigley made a surprising, but unsuccessful, attempt to buy in 2002.

Many experts expect Wrigley to make more acquisitions, and a key part of the CB Richard Ellis study is to determine the amount of Wrigley's future space needs.

Todd Lippman, an executive vice president with CB Richard Ellis, who is handling the Wrigley study, could not be reached for comment.

Study's deadline unclear

A time frame for completion of the study could not be determined. Meanwhile, a short-term lease could give Wrigley time to expand in its current location as tenants move out, experts say.

And the company could still opt to divide its offices between its historic home and another building, although most large corporations would consider consolidation to be a key benefit.

But many large downtown firms are relocating into new office towers, motivated by advantages such as larger, more efficient floors, improved technological capacity, and lower operating costs.

A new Wrigley Building would give the company a more modern image, developer Fifield said.

"Look at the innovation center," he said, referring to the company's new high-tech, 208,000 square foot research campus on Goose Island.

Employees have already started to move into the $84.3 million facility, a key part of a focus on product development begun in 2001.

If the Wrigley Building went up for sale, most real estate experts say residential developers would likely outbid office building investors, similar to the 2002 sale of the Palmolive Building, when Draper & Kramer acquired the building. Yet, despite the Wrigley Building's prestige, a residential conversion would be a challenge, requiring time-consuming city approvals, an arrangement for parking, and hefty construction costs.

Although not a city landmark, real estate developers say neither the company nor city officials would allow any changes to its classic aspects, particularly the facade.

Moreover, another historic feature, the building's nighttime illumination, would also complicate any conversion. The lighting poses little issue for office workers who leave at dusk, but would be a problem for condo residents, said developer Michael Lerner, president of MCZ Development Corp.

"The deal will certainly sell, because the building is so fantastic, but there are a lot of things to overcome," he said.
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for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old June 19th, 2005, 07:58 PM   #78
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I happened to catch a glance on the TV of the Wrigley's possible conversion when I was at dinner last night. I'm still not sure how I feel about the whole thing, but, I guess whatever's good for the area is good for me!
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Old June 20th, 2005, 02:34 AM   #79
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^
Word.
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for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old June 20th, 2005, 02:47 AM   #80
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The possible conversion of the Wrigley makes me shudder, although I'm very pleased to learn that the expansion of Wrigley Co. is benefiting Chicago in terms of office absorption.

This news about the way South Michigan is developing is music to my ears. The quality of design of the condos being built south of Roosevelt on Michigan seems generally pretty high. I look forward to the day when one can take a long walk down Michigan all the way from IIT to Oak Street, basking in the continuous urbanity of it all.
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