daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 5th, 2005, 06:44 AM   #101
Chi_Coruscant
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 0

- edit
Chi_Coruscant no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 5th, 2005, 07:38 AM   #102
geoff_diamond
Live from the Loop
 
geoff_diamond's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,578
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
30 S. Monroe
That's a new one on me. I think they mean 30 W. Monroe.
geoff_diamond no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2005, 10:38 AM   #103
Chicago Shawn
Registered User
 
Chicago Shawn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chicago IL
Posts: 361
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi_Coruscant
From "At Deadline" section in Chicago Crain's:

Daley plans meeting for Gold Coast tower
Mayor Richard M. Daley scheduled a mid-July meeting with the Rev. John Buchanan, pastor of Fourth Presbyterian Church, amid controversy over the church's proposal to build a 64-story residential tower on a section of its historic Michigan Avenue property. The local alderman, Burton Natarus (42nd), recently announced opposition to a zoning change needed for the project. Neither Mr. Daley nor his Department of Planning has taken a position. [Greg Hinz]

Mittal Steel narrows search for HQ site
Mittal Steel Co. narrowed its search for a U.S. headquarters site in Chicago to four downtown buildings, people close to the search say. The Netherlands-based steel-making conglomerate is looking for 60,000 square feet to accommodate about 200 employees. Mittal is eyeing space at 30 S. Monroe, the old headquarters of Inland Steel. The other buildings in the running are 1 S. Dearborn, 180 N. Stetson, and 200 S. Michigan. [Bob Tita]
Very good news on both counts. I belive Daley will come out supporting this tower, which will tip the scale in favor for this project as it heads to the Plan Commission, Natarus may openly oppose it to appease the NIMBYS of his ward, but I believe he will be over rulled by the other members of the Plan Commision. Daley standing behind the project will go a long way to making that happan.

Also great news, is that Mittal Steel will will open thier new HQ within downtown. My guess is they will choose 180 N. Stetson due to its location near the Randolph Street Station, where the South Shore Line would link the HQ to the steel mills in NW Indiana.
Chicago Shawn no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2005, 05:56 PM   #104
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

Cook County's Originality
Courthouse Project Breaks New Ground

by Paula Widholm

The renovation of a 19th Century warehouse into the Cook County Domestic Violence Courthouse pioneers the county's first Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design-certified "green" building and the area's first European rain-screen cladding system.


A Cook County ordinance, passed in 2002, requires all new county buildings to be LEED certified under the U.S. Green Building Council in Washington, D.C. However, the $64.2 million courthouse project at 555 W. Harrison St. in Chicago is going beyond the lowest LEED designation, "certified," and is shooting for a Silver designation.

After the design phase by Chicago-based lead architect Campbell Tiu Campbell, the joint venture of Wood Dale-based George Sollitt Construction Co. and Chicago-based Oakley Construction began construction in February 2004. The project is slated to be complete by the end of July and will open this fall.

The existing Domestic Violence Courthouse at 13th Street and Michigan Avenue is "very overcrowded, and there isn't adequate separation of victims from the accused," said Elizabeth Melas, deputy director of capital planning for Cook County. The existing facility will be closed once the new facility about a mile to the northwest is complete.

The new facility's 10 courtrooms replace six at the Michigan Avenue facility and one offsite. The new courthouse's design keeps victims, judges and the public separated from prisoners, who will enter the 192,636-sq.-ft. building via the sally port at the basement level. Also, an onsite day-care center provides a safe, fun environment for the children of victims during court proceedings.

'Green' Items

A major "green" component is a 110-kW photovoltaic system that will supply 5 percent of the building's power. Manufactured by Bedford, Mass.-based Spire Corp., the solar panels cover about 40 percent of the building's roof.

The PV system will be one of the largest in the Midwest and would provide the equivalent of electrical energy used annually by 20-25 Chicago homes.

Other environmentally friendly elements include high-efficiency boilers, recycling of at least 50 percent of the construction waste, a system of capturing parking-lot rainwater into cisterns for watering the landscaping, use of low-odor-emitting materials and paints and buying 20 percent of construction materials from local and regional suppliers.

Another effort was made to make environmental choices easier for employees.

"We'll have a shower and changing room in the basement for people who want to ride their bikes to work," Melas said. "There'll be a place to lock up the bikes outside."

While some of the "green" items carry higher upfront costs, Melas said it should result in building lifecycle savings.

A Grand Entry

Through a redesign, the front of the building is repositioned to what was formerly the building's rear.

The new main entrance on the north elevation was incorporated to take advantage of the site. A different warehouse that was once north of the project site was previously demolished to create empty space that will become a parking lot.

Therefore, an architectural challenge was faced in creating a new facade on the beige brick that would complement the other three sides' rust-colored brick. Instead of simply cladding it, Chicago-based Booth Hansen, architect for the north elevation, designed a rust-colored wall 16 ft. in front of the facility that is secured to the front of the building with steel trusses to form an atrium.

At roof-level, the atrium wall curves to south-facing glass panels that "scoops sunlight from the south and throws it into the atrium," said George Halik, principal of Booth Hansen. "A new front for the main entrance gives it a new, fresh facade."

Melas called the atrium a grand-entry point. "It's open and welcoming and allows space for circulation."

Booth Hansen designer Scott Cyphers added that the large windows that comprise 40 percent of the atrium wall draw in natural light and won't obscure the original building, which will keep the beige brick.

"You can see through to the existing building," he said. "It plays off the new versus the old. We're not covering up the history of the building. It adds to the richness of the space."

The two metal-paneled end conditions and roof also highlight the atrium wall.

The interior of the atrium wall and the public spaces are lined with a blond wood veneer hardened by resin to resist scratches and wear. Black granite accents and terrazzo floors will also be in the common areas.

Terracotta Rain-Screen System

In addition to its pleasing aesthetics, the exterior atrium wall uses a rain-screen system, a method of sustainable wall construction that's making its debut in the Chicago area on this project.

With no examples of this product locally, Cook County representatives traveled to St. Louis to see how it looked on a building there.

"We wanted a material on the new atrium that worked with the brick on the other three sides," Melas said. "We wanted a complimentary material, but not brick."

To install the system, clay tiles are attached to an aluminum framing system.

The open joints allow air to circulate behind the clay tile, equalizing pressure so the building doesn't suck in air and water. It also functions as a ventilation system for the interior cavity.

Past this air pocket are 2 in. of rigid Styrofoam insulation. Behind that, a waterproof membrane is applied to the structural block wall. The pressure equalization eliminates inherent maintenance problems of traditional enclosures that require tuck-pointing and resealing of caulk over time, Halik said.

While the system is used extensively in Germany, it's only present in a handful of locations nationally. However, it's gaining popularity.

"There's tremendous interest in this system with architects and owners," said Kevin Lynch, vice president of Tinley Park-based Architectural Glass Works, the subcontractor installing it on the project.

Since construction began on the Domestic Violence Courthouse, Lynch said he's started working with four architects in budgeting and design details for incorporating this system on other projects. "Architects are looking at more unique enclosure elements on a building," he added.

The cost of a rain-screen system ranges from $40 to $70 per sq. ft. depending on the quantity, color and size, Lynch said.

Demolition and Excavation

One of the biggest construction issues was demolition of large parts of the clay tile arch floors to make way for seven new elevators. The old limestone foundation under about half of the north elevation was also excavated for the below-grade sally port.

"We were temporarily supporting the building with shoring, concrete, structural steel and needle beams," said Jamie Rahn, vice president of George Sollitt Construction. "The most challenging part was the structural aspect, trying to take it apart delicately and gingerly and put it back together in a sound way."

In addition, the project has complex mechanical and electrical systems that were coordinated with the PV system as well as elaborate security, lighting and audiovisual systems.

"They had to be squeezed into an existing basement with low hanging ceilings," Rahn said. "A rooftop penthouse was also added to house air-handling equipment for the PV system."
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2005, 10:35 PM   #105
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,935
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi_Coruscant
From "At Deadline" section in Chicago Crain's:

Daley plans meeting for Gold Coast tower
Mayor Richard M. Daley scheduled a mid-July meeting with the Rev. John Buchanan, pastor of Fourth Presbyterian Church, amid controversy over the church's proposal to build a 64-story residential tower on a section of its historic Michigan Avenue property. The local alderman, Burton Natarus (42nd), recently announced opposition to a zoning change needed for the project. Neither Mr. Daley nor his Department of Planning has taken a position. [Greg Hinz]

Mittal Steel narrows search for HQ site
Mittal Steel Co. narrowed its search for a U.S. headquarters site in Chicago to four downtown buildings, people close to the search say. The Netherlands-based steel-making conglomerate is looking for 60,000 square feet to accommodate about 200 employees. Mittal is eyeing space at 30 S. Monroe, the old headquarters of Inland Steel. The other buildings in the running are 1 S. Dearborn, 180 N. Stetson, and 200 S. Michigan. [Bob Tita]
^I wouldn't necessarily take either of these as great news.

Regarding Daley and 4th Presbyterian, there's no reason to believe he'll go against SOAR--I mean, the guy really needs his strongest constituents now, esp with his Mayorship in question.

Regarding Mittal Steel, correct me if I'm wrong, but the article says they narrowed their search for a U.S. Headquarters site "in Chicago". They didn't really say that they've ruled out NW Indiana, yet. This, at least, is my read of that little blip...

Last edited by The Urban Politician; July 5th, 2005 at 10:45 PM.
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2005, 10:49 PM   #106
Frumie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 717
Likes (Received): 0

Village Green, Everhardt buy 188 W. Randolph

By Julie Jargon
An historic gothic revival building that was named a public hazard four years ago has been purchased by Village Green Companies and Everhardt & Nesis Co.
When chunks of terra cotta began falling off the façade of the 45-story former office building at 188 West Randolph Street in 2001, the city tried to get the building’s owners to fix the problem, to no avail. The new owners, who bought the building out of bankruptcy, will convert the 76-year-old structure into 300 high-end apartments. Plans for the 300,000-square-foot building also include 9,800-square feet of restaurant and retail space.

Charles Everhardt, a Chicago real estate broker who’s new to residential real estate development, partnered with Detroit-based developer Village Green Companies on the $10 million deal. Mr. Everhardt previously told Crain’s that he expects to spend $60 million rehabbing the building.
Related story: 188 W. Randolph going residential

“There will be rather extensive work done to the exterior of the building,” Village Green chairman Jonathan Holtzman says, adding that the company will work to preserve the historic nature of the façade. It will be considered a “green” building, in which energy-efficient systems and recycled building materials will be used.

Construction will begin in 20 months, after the developers have worked out details with the city.
__________________
You truly want peace? Be righteous.
Frumie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2005, 01:36 AM   #107
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

For Immediate Release
Contact: Constance Buscemi
Phone: (312) 744-2976
E-mail: [email protected]
Wednesday, June 8, 2005
Former police station site looking up

$5.7 million land sale to pave way for new condo tower

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
An ordinance was introduced today into the Chicago City Council by Mayor Richard M. Daley that would grant authority to the Department of Planning and Development to sell the vacant lot at 110 W. Superior St. for $5.7 million for a proposed redevelopment project.
The developer, 110 W. Superior LLC., was selected through an advertised bidding process. Their bid offer was $1 million more than the appraised value of the property.

"This plan gives new life to a now vacant, underutilize and unattractive parcel of land that will ultimately benefit the Near North Side community and its residents as well as the City and the taxpayers," said Mayor Daley.

Under the proposed ordinance, the land which was previously the site of the 18th District Police Station would be redeveloped into a 26-story residential building containing 77 condominium units.

The building also would be include several environmentally friendly elements and amenities such as a 3,710 square feet of green roof on the 5th and 26th floors, 85 parking spaces, and a 300 square foot dog run on the 25th floor.

A rendering of the proposed tower.



Last edited by BVictor1; July 6th, 2005 at 01:51 AM.
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2005, 03:22 AM   #108
Chi_Coruscant
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 0

^I like the green roof. It will prevent water run-down.
Chi_Coruscant no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2005, 08:17 AM   #109
geoff_diamond
Live from the Loop
 
geoff_diamond's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,578
Likes (Received): 2

The tower's fine... I despise the "spine" of balconies running right up the gut though. They'd be better if they were flush with the rest of the facade rather than protruding.

But, as I always say, mediocre development is better than no development
geoff_diamond no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2005, 01:55 PM   #110
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

Building sale promises Randolph St. upgrade

July 6, 2005

BY DAVID ROEDER SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST


A firm that builds and operates apartment buildings has closed on the acquisition of a Jazz Age office building in the Loop. The deal could serve as a catalyst for improvement on a grubby stretch of Randolph Street.

Village Green Cos., in partnership with Everhardt & Nesis Co., has purchased the 45-story 188 W. Randolph building, best known here in recent years for showering terra cotta upon pedestrians near Randolph and Wells. It was bought out of bankruptcy for $10 million.

Based in Farmington Hills, Mich., Village Green has set itself apart in Chicago by investing in rental apartments and staying with them, not flipping them for condos. Its most recent project here was the conversion of an old office building at 185 N. Wabash into luxury apartments.

The company's chairman, Jonathan Holtzman, said he'll continue operating 188 W. Randolph, also called Randolph Tower, as an office building for 20 months while redevelopment plans are worked out with the city and the terra-cotta repairs continue. He said the building is only about 40 percent occupied and it's possible a major tenant, the Randolph Athletic Club, might remain after the conversion.

The 1929 building by the architectural firm Vitzhum and Burns could accommodate about 300 apartments, Holtzman said. But also of interest is the fate of three small buildings immediately east of 188 W. Randolph, properties the city once considered condemning for redevelopment.

Holtzman said he believes another buyer has a contract to purchase two of the buildings. The third building, 174 W. Randolph, is city-owned and under one plan would be leveled for a parking lot. He said he will monitor the situation to make sure any development will complement his plans.

Connie Buscemi, spokeswoman for the city's planning department, said the agency is unaware of any pending sale of the small buildings. No action has been taken on the parking lot proposed by Clovis Investment LLC. The design calls for cars to access the lot via an alley, something other parking operators grumbled the city would never allow anywhere else.
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2005, 07:13 AM   #111
Chicago Shawn
Registered User
 
Chicago Shawn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chicago IL
Posts: 361
Likes (Received): 0

Some construction porn from today...

Prentice hospital




600 LSD has the locations of caissons staked out...




345 E. Ohio




Regatta




1 South Dearborn



Chicago Shawn no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2005, 02:26 PM   #112
Chi_Coruscant
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 0

May worth reading, though insignificant to skyscraper

Robert Morris Adds 70,000 SF to State St. Lease
By Mark Ruda (www.globest.com)
Last updated: July 6, 2005 06:50pm

CHICAGO-Robert Morris College, which has anchored 401 S. State St. and helped create an “education corridor” in the South Loop, is expanding its long-term lease there by 70,000 sf. The college, which relocated from 180 N. LaSalle St. in 1998, now has 270,000 sf, or about 60% of the 114-year-old building owned by Oakbrook Terrace-based Anvan Realty.
The Central and South Loop is home to Columbia College, Roosevelt University, the School of the Art Institute as well as a DePaul University Downtown campus. The location in the “education corridor” is partly responsible for increased enrollment and the need for more space, says Studley executive vice president Joe Learner, who represented Robert Morris College in negotiations with Anvan Realty’s Tom Garrity. Although terms were not disclosed, the remaining space in the building is being marketed at $20.50 per sf on a modified gross lease basis.

In addition to 401 S. State St., Robert Morris College has satellite campuses in Bensenville, Orland Park and Waukegan. In addition to lease deals in those suburbs, Studley negotiated the college’s 10-year early lease extension in 2002.
Chi_Coruscant no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2005, 03:34 PM   #113
ChicagoLover
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: New York City
Posts: 819
Likes (Received): 0

HMm... Thank you Chicago Shawn for satisfying my daily fix. So I suppose they are shoehorning a garage into the base of 1 South Dearborn along with the 20 foot lobby? How many cars?
ChicagoLover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2005, 08:29 PM   #114
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

Hotel at State & Lake
Two-tower plan gets new push in West Loop

June 22, 2005

BY DAVID ROEDER SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST

....

STATE STREET SALE: The sale of the 201 N. State building closed Monday for $6.5 million. The buyer, Environmental Community Development Inc. of Lincolnshire, plans to replace the five-story building with a hotel and a new Fritzel's restaurant, an attempt to recreate a Chicago icon formerly at that location. The buyer was represented by George and Melvin Kaplan of Melvin M. Kaplan Realty Inc. The seller was the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago, which plans to build a studio a block away in a new residential tower planned for the northeast corner of State and Wabash.
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 8th, 2005, 04:09 AM   #115
ThirdCoast312
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: north side
Posts: 229
Likes (Received): 0

didn't know wabash and state intersect ... and do we really need another HOTEL???? Am only for this hotel business going on if the city can learn to match its tourism promotion to its vast number of hotel rooms.
ThirdCoast312 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 02:00 PM   #116
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

ARCHITECTURE

Throwing tradition a curve

The Pritzkers' new Hyatt Center takes the edge off Chicago's relentless right angles

By Blair Kamin
Tribune architecture critic
Published July 10, 2005

Because it is Chicago's first post-9/11 skyscraper and its developers include the billionaire Pritzker family, which each year awards architecture's equivalent of the Nobel Prize, the new Hyatt Center office building was bound to attract a high level of scrutiny.

Would the Pritzkers produce a building that lives up to the prize's lofty rhetoric about contributions to humanity through the art of architecture?

Would the skyscraper creatively balance security and openness or would it be a fortress, like the proposed new Freedom Tower at ground zero? That question took on fresh urgency Thursday after a series of explosions ripped through London's subway system and destroyed a double-decker bus, killing at least 37 people.

The suavely curving, 49-story office building, it turns out, is very good, though not the show-stopping aesthetic statement some had hoped for and the Pritzkers themselves had planned before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks prompted them to change their architect and ambitions in midstream.

Designed by Henry Cobb of the New York City firm of Pei Cobb Freed, the Hyatt Center cleverly accepts the constraints of tight budget and security features and, in the manner of a skilled practitioner of judo, turns them to the advantage of the cityscape.

The tower's curving walls of steel and glass lend it a distinct skyline presence, making it seem like a ship cutting through space. But it really excels at ground level, where its curves open its narrow, blocklong site to a small but artfully composed public plaza that has instantly established itself as a serene oasis amid the dense commercial canyon of South Wacker Drive.

Joining with the open space at the bottom of an equally fine new skyscraper across Monroe Street, the 52-story 111 South Wacker Drive, the Hyatt Center forms an elegant, pedestrian-friendly gateway to the Loop.

The design reveals how architects can deftly layer security features into their buildings rather than letting the need to fortify overrun the desire to beautify. And while its curves appear to be a heretical departure from the relentless right angles of Chicago's street grid and skyline, the skyscraper actually fits into the city's vaunted tradition of hard-nosed, but high-quality, commercial design.

Located at 71 S. Wacker, two blocks north of Sears Tower and set to have its ceremonial opening July 19, the Hyatt Center originally was to have been designed by Lord Norman Foster, the Pritzker Prize-winning London architect renowned for his spectacular, ecologically conscious office buildings. It was to be a corporate headquarters with a lavish budget. The design was to make "a special shout," in the words of the Pritzkers' development partner, John W. Higgins, chairman of Higgins Development Partners of Chicago.

Foster's plan called for a rectangular office block linked by bridges to a rectangular core for elevators and other services. A towering atrium would have soared between the offices and the service core.

But on Sept. 12, 2001, Penny Pritzker, president of the Pritzker Realty Group, called Foster and told him the project was dead. The first Gulf War in 1990-91 had had severe economic consequences for the Pritzkers' Hyatt hotel chain, and "we knew this was worse," she said in an interview last week. The prospect of a major downturn in the hotel business made going forward with Foster's ambitious design unthinkable.

In many respects, it is remarkable that the Hyatt Center turned out as well as it did, given what then transpired.

The tower was, in effect, downgraded from a corporate headquarters to a speculative office building that would have to attract tenants and be built on a tight budget and a tight time frame. In response to 9/11, the building's security features were ratcheted up. And a new architect of less starpower was brought on -- Cobb, a distinguished elder statesman whose best-known work is Boston's John Hancock Tower, an abstract, mirror-glass high-rise that seems to disappear into the sky.

Cobb seemed like a conservative choice. Yet his skill would be a decisive factor in making the project a success.

Cobb flew to Chicago and walked the long, rectangular site, which, he quickly realized, would be hemmed in on the north by Helmut Jahn's 1 S. Wacker office building and on the south by the 111 S. Wacker project.

No corner offices

He also read a document, known as a program, that laid out the functional needs of a key prospective tenant, the law firm of Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw. Critically, the lawyers weren't demanding corner offices, which inevitably lead to boxy or serrated exteriors.

Cobb jumped on that detail, sketching a plan for a fish-shaped office tower that offered several advantages: It would have no corner offices, offer more expansive views than a conventional box, carve out room for the plaza and be architecturally distinctive. Mayer Brown and the developers bought the idea, though the curving building would cost slightly more than a conventional box.

So did other key tenants, including IBM, Charter One and Goldman Sachs, the global investment banking, securities and investment management firm.

While Cobb already had completed a curving office tower at La Defense in Paris and some wondered whether the Hyatt Center would be a retread, the soundness of Cobb's concept is apparent now that the tower is complete.

The curve is the key to the building's skyline success. Without it, the tower's horizontal bands of stainless steel and glass would be a visual bore. Yet the curve energizes the bands, making them appear to sweep around the tower and making the tower itself seem as if it is steaming forward, like a great ship.

Even though the Hyatt Center is less than half as tall as Sears, it nonetheless has an assertive skyline presence, its ship shape clearly visible from such everyday vantage points as the Kennedy Expressway, the boat cruise on the Chicago River and Grant Park.

Equally important is the way the tower's curves end -- not in a rounded prow but in solid, angled steel-covered walls that suggest the mouth of a fish. Resolutely vertical, these end walls establish a simmering tension with the horizontality of the bands, giving the tower the right dose of Chicago toughness.

In another well-handled detail, window frames are set flush with the facade, avoiding costly projections and enhancing the tower's continuity of line. "Let's face it," says Cobb, "if you're doing a budget building, keep it smooth. What makes it affordable is the fact that it doesn't have relief."

The lone fault is in the surface of the stainless steel, which suffers in some places from the dimpled effect architects call "oil canning."

Obligations of skyscrapers

Cobb often speaks of the social obligations of skyscrapers, saying they should be good citizens, especially as they meet the street. His performance at ground level lives up to that challenge. He and Chicago landscape architect Peter Schaudt have deftly balanced security needs and a desire for openness in the interconnected spaces of the Hyatt Center's public plaza and lobby.

Casual passersby may not realize that the planter boxes in the plaza are designed to keep a car- or truck-bomb away from the building's concrete-encased supporting columns. Yet the boxes do that double duty, an assignment they carry out far more gracefully than a graveyardlike row of bollards.

The free-form curves of the planters sensitively extend the office tower's curving geometry. And the planters offer a good combination of perimeter sitting areas and intimate, circular nichelike spaces. Still, few people seem to be sitting on the bent-grass lawns that fill them.

Inside, Cobb has turned the need for metal detectors to his advantage, shaping an entry sequence that actually improves upon the modernist convention of the wide-open, but spatially undernourished, office building lobby.

Instead, he gives you this eventful sequence: You pass beneath low canopies on the Wacker and Franklin Street ends of the building and arrive in one of a pair of skylit, 50-foot-tall outer lobbies.

From there, if you are an office worker or an approved visitor, you go through a low-ceilinged metal detector area before heading into another expansive space -- the tower's curving inner lobby, which extends the length of the building and is lined with a veil of bamboo trees and bubbling fountains as it leads to the elevators.

While the public isn't allowed to venture into the serene inner lobby, it still gets the visual bonus of an indoor extension of the plaza's green space.

The tower's office floors appear to be attractive work places, an impression confirmed by a Mayer, Brown lawyer who offered the following observations: Lawyers appreciate their new quarters' openness and light-filled quality. Uninterrupted, curving hallways encourage people to interact. Still, the building's curving shape hasn't really eliminated the hierarchy once created by corner offices. Senior lawyers took offices with the prime views, looking northeast toward the skyline and the lake.

In other words, everything at the Hyatt Center is operating normally, or at least as normally as one can expect within the new realities of the post 9/11 world. While Cobb's tower may not set the architectural world on fire, it is nonetheless a distinguished contribution to the Chicago skyline and to the broader culture. Following the unveiling of the fortresslike Freedom Tower, it offers an alternative vision, one in which our fears -- and, thus, our buildings -- remain in proper proportion.

- - -

The Loop gets bold, inviting gateway

The Spanish Revival Wrigley Building and the neo-Gothic Tribune Tower shape a stylish entrance to North Michigan Avenue. Now the Hyatt Center and its equally appealing counterpart across Monroe Street, the new office building known as 111 South Wacker Drive, are putting a fresh spin on this tradition, using the abstract forms of modernism to usher into and out of the Loop commuters who use the nearby train stations.

Even though the two buildings were designed in different manners by different architects for different developers -- and neither team communicated with the other -- they work surprisingly well together. Maybe the late, great Chicago modernist Ludwig Mies van der Rohe had it right when he said, "Build, don't talk."

Designed by Jim Goettsch of the Chicago firm of Lohan Caprile Goettsch and developed by the John Buck Co. of Chicago, the 52-story 111 S. Wacker is a muscular skyscraper that reveals its internal structure rather than concealing it, as the Hyatt Center does. Yet like the Hyatt Center, it makes a civilized, curvaceous clearing at ground level.

The big move is structural: V-shaped diagonal columns, expressed in the facade's lower portions, transfer the building's loads to beefy columns that meet the ground. The spans between these columns measures a jaw-dropping 80 feet, providing a remarkable degree of openness even though the building's footprint occupies nearly the entire site.

An oval-shaped lobby that slips beneath the building's boxy office and parking garage floors adds to the sense of spaciousness. It is wrapped in an extraordinarily transparent wall of cable-supported glass, almost making the distinction between inside and outside disappear. At the Hyatt Center, space flows around the building's curving, shiplike form. Here, space flows right through the lobby.

The visual drama is enhanced by what passersby can glimpse inside -- a stepping, curved ceiling that echoes the contours of a parking garage ramp that passes directly above it. Perhaps the ceiling's accent lights are a bit bright. Yet one can forgive that fault when the lobby is seen in the broader picture of the show that 111 S. Wacker puts on at ground level and the amenities it places there, including granite-clad benches.

111 S. Wacker and the Hyatt Center are as urbanistically responsible as the handsome pair of gateway towers that lead into the Loop at the eastern end of Monroe, the University Club at 76 E. Monroe and the Monroe Building at 104 S. Michigan Ave. Both were designed by Chicago architects Holabird & Roche in the early 20th Century, with complementary Gothic details and gabled roof silhouettes. At Wacker and Monroe, though, the gateway moves are at the bottom, not the top. It makes sense: Put the gateways at the base, right where pedestrians can see (and use) them.

-- B.K.

----------

[email protected]

Last edited by BVictor1; July 10th, 2005 at 09:16 PM.
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 02:04 PM   #117
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

THE MARKET
Rental high-rise story far from over

Wayne Faulkner, Real Estate editor

Published July 10, 2005

Just when we thought condo conversions were turning the rental high-rise into a dinosaur, along come three new ones for downtown Chicago.

And that's in addition to the Shoreham at Lakeshore East, already up and running.

Two are planned by Golub & Co. for East Ohio Street in Streeterville, with 49 and 51 stories and about 900 units. One is under construction.

The third, however, was built in 1929. Village Green Cos., in conjunction with Everhardt & Nesis Co., has closed on the purchase of Randolph Tower, 188 W. Randolph St., and plans to restore the 45-story building and convert it into 300 apartments plus 9,800 square feet of retail and restaurant space.

Village Green bought the gothic revival building out of bankruptcy, according to the developer and manager of apartment properties, based in Farmington Hills, Mich.

The company says it will rename the property Randolph Tower City Apartments, part of its "City Apartments" brand, which in Chicago also includes Fisher Building City Apartments with 184 units and Medical District City Apartments with 412 units. It also is turning the old Medical Arts Building at Lake Street and Wabash Avenue into the 192-unit MDA City Apartments, with first occupancies this month.

The company said the office building will continue operating as it is for about 20 months while it develops plans with the city and Ald. Burton L. Natarus (42nd).

Village Green would not discuss details of its purchase, but 188 W. Randolph had been encumbered with building-code violations.

107 years old, 3 owners

Not long ago I wrote about a mid-20th Century house for sale on the Gold Coast -- the Florsheim Mansion. Its architecture, though elegant, is in the minority in that tony area.

If you want 19th Century architecture, then a house once owned by the Ryerson family might pique your interest.

The asking price for the 12,000-square-foot mansion is $6 million. And if you were to buy it, you'd be only the fourth owner since it was built in 1898, according to listing agent, Wendy Berger Shapiro of Baum Realty Group.

In 1894, George W. Meeker, a confidant of Abraham Lincoln, commissioned the Holibard & Root architecture firm to build this structure.

In 1919, Edward Ryerson of Inland Steel bought it, according to Shapiro.

The Ryersons lived there until 1965 and so loved the house they aimed to tear it down, rather than sell it to someone who would not be a good steward, according to the current owners.

In fact, Mrs. Ryerson would hide in the broom closet under the stairwell to hear prospective buyers' comments. When she heard one prospect say, "I want it and I won't change a thing," she and her husband decided to sell to them, according to the current owners. They were the lucky couple.

The facade is landmarked, according to Shapiro. Much of the original woodwork remains, as well as wood floors under carpeting, she added. It also has two kitchens, four baths and four half baths, seven working fireplaces, two working dumbwaiters and a wine cellar. Outside is a garden terrace that measures about 25 by 10 feet. Property taxes last year were $34,995.

In 1923, Ryerson added on to the house in such a way that the elevation of the home rises gradually from the front steps to the library addition. That rise equals a flight of stairs, Shapiro said, so the two-car garage space under the library is at grade level.

If 12,000 square feet isn't enough, that addition was built to accommodate two more stories atop it, Shapiro said. All original contractor specs plus the blueprints for every addition Ryerson made come with the house.

----------
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 02:12 PM   #118
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

Wrigley Building is seen in new light
High-tech bulbs will go on later this month

By John McCormick
Tribune staff reporter
Published July 10, 2005

The stately Wrigley Building, whose white terra cotta facade has made it a Chicago landmark for decades, will soon be lit at night by more focused beams, reducing what some consider light pollution in an area that will eventually include Donald Trump's hotel and condominium tower.

In a move that could change the look of the Magnificent Mile's southern sky, the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. says it will turn on a high-tech set of new lights later this month, replacing a massive bank of stadium-strength bulbs that have lit the structure from across the Chicago River since 1971.

The new illumination will come from Popsicle-shaped lampposts that are already drawing some strange looks from passersby.

"It's just hideous," said Elizabeth Richard, a Michigan Avenue resident who walks by the light posts daily. "But it's like anything. Your eyesight eventually gets used to the obstruction."

From Michigan Avenue, the new tan-colored posts block some of the building's sight lines and clash with its white walls. But company representatives say the new lighting will bring many benefits.

"The change is being made to enhance the appearance of the building and to minimize any lighting spillover," said Wrigley spokesman Christopher Perille. "It is also going to be more energy efficient and cost effective."

Like the crown of light atop the Merchandise Mart and the antenna spires on the Sears Tower, the white glow on the Wrigley Building's two Spanish Revival-style towers is a trademark of nighttime Chicago. So any modifications at 400-410 N. Michigan Ave. offer the possibility for controversy.

Wrigley representatives, who are providing few details about the new system, promise the changes will not harm the architectural gem's appearance.

The modification comes at a time when the company is studying its long-term real estate needs and a possible move from its historic headquarters, a development that has prompted some real estate speculators to suggest that the building could someday be turned into luxury condominiums.

If the building ever goes condo, the conversion could be complicated by its nighttime illumination, real estate experts have suggested. While the lighting poses few problems for office workers who leave at dusk, it could be an issue for residents trying to sleep.

The gum and candy company first mentioned replacement of the current lights in 2002, as part of an unfulfilled redevelopment plan that was to bring shops and upscale boutiques to the historic structure.

That was after Trump announced plans for the Trump International Hotel & Tower Chicago, a mixed-use building on the former site of the Chicago Sun-Times that is scheduled to be completed in 2007.

But Perille said the new lights have nothing to do with Trump.

"It had zero to do with any other developments in the area," he said. "But [Trump residents] will benefit to the extent that any other building neighbor benefits."

Jill Cremer, vice president of development for the Trump organization, said the Wrigley Building's lighting never came up during site negotiations.

"Their current lighting scheme was never an issue," she said. "It's a great asset the way it is."

Lee Bey, a spokesman for Trump's architects, the Chicago firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, said the old lights would have cast "some spillage" onto non-housing floors of the structure, but it was never factored into the building's design.

But Wrigley's bright lights have long bothered south-facing residents in the nearby 54-story River Plaza tower at 405 N. Wabash Ave., a building that combines condos and offices.

"With the new lights, we hope it won't be as bright," said Winston Tsao, who since 2001 has lived in a unit on the 45th floor that faces south. "It's like any other inconvenience, like sirens. But you get used to it."

The new lights are atop poles about the height of streetlights. They have metal shades that wrap around two-thirds of their bulb area. Two have been erected on the west side of Michigan Avenue near the Wrigley Building and three more are on the east side of the street.

Behind the building, two additional lights have been placed on a Rush Street sidewalk, near a restaurant entrance. Perille said the lights behind the building have already been tested on recent nights.

The new system was designed by Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum (HOK) in St. Louis. But a lighting architect for the firm who worked on the project declined to answer any questions about the lights, saying Wrigley had sworn him to secrecy.

Wrigley has agreed to pay the city $15,471 annually for the right to place the structures on public sidewalks.

Ald. Burton Natarus (42nd), who represents the area, said he likes the new light posts.

"They are attractive," he said. "But I want them pointed in the right direction, and they will be."

John Maxson, president of the Greater North Michigan Avenue Association, said he has heard no complaints about the look of the new lights, though nearby residents have long beefed about the existing lights shining in their windows, especially when it is foggy.

"The residents were complaining about light coming from the old system and it was probably only going to get worse with the Trump Tower," he said.

The change in lighting isn't the first for the building, which has been illuminated by various methods since its completion in the early 1920s.

When the Michigan Avenue bridge was opened in 1920, more than 100 floodlights were installed on the roof of a nearby soap factory.

By the early 1930s, a red brick warehouse east of the Michigan Avenue bridge held the lights. They remained there for nearly 40 years, until the warehouse was demolished.

The lights were then moved to a 180-foot, billboard-like structure between the upper and lower levels of East Wacker Drive, on the south side of the river and east of the Michigan Avenue Bridge.

There have been periods of darkness. During World War II, Wrigley donated its lights for use at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. And during the energy crisis of late 1973 and early 1974, the 218,000 watts of light were shut down as a conservation measure.

Besides the lights on the river, Wrigley has also used 16 1,000-watt lights west of the building, according to its Web site. To help create the effect of gradual brightness toward the top, 62 lights were installed on the building itself.

David Bahlman, executive director of the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois, said he has only a few concerns about the new lighting arrangement, mostly with the aesthetics of the light posts on what he considers an already overly crowded and commercialized North Michigan Avenue.

"My opinion is that it is not a preservation issue," he said.

----------

[email protected]
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 09:17 PM   #119
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

They better not leave the building and make it into luxury condos...if people want that they can buy into the many buildings around the city.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 10:29 PM   #120
BVictor1
Chicago's #1 Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 879

Originally posted by Jaroslaw in the SSP Forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaroslaw
In today's Tribune (it was lying around at a cafe), there is a neat drawing of Central Station, with a new building apparently planned to the S of Lofts II (bottom left corner):



A couple of neat buildings there now:



Edit: ss.com has it listed as 1337-1355 South Michigan Avenue, 32F, proposed.


The property is at 1337-1355 South Michigan will be improved with a 32-story building containing comercial/retail at its base, 260 dwelling units and accessory parking.

Interesting top. I will stop by the sales center tomorrow.
BVictor1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu