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Old April 23rd, 2014, 11:00 PM   #221
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Night City Dream_ View Post
Can anyone sum up all this information:

How many lines are there in total?
How many kms of tracks?
How many stations?

How many types of rolling stock are there currently on all the lines?
Well, I can sum a few bits of information for you:

There are 30 operators in the Greater Tokyo area operating 121 passenger rail lines with 882 stations. The total network across the metropolitan area is 2419.8km for all railways (excluding monorails I believe). Approximately 40 million journeys occur every day on the network.

There are 17670.3km of bus routes as well in the city.

I can't answer about how many types of rolling stock there are. That's too much for me to list.

(The railway lengths and bus network lengths are current as of 2009, so things might have changed, but these are the most recent figures I can find).

Last edited by Svartmetall; April 23rd, 2014 at 11:17 PM.
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Old April 24th, 2014, 03:56 AM   #222
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For all urban rail there are 49 operators, 146 lines, 4,714.7 km and there are 2,141 stations.
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Old April 24th, 2014, 10:14 AM   #223
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Wow, that's a lot more than I managed to find. Can I ask where the information came from? I got mine from a Tokyo Metro presentation to the 2013 Rail Conference (http://www.apta.com/mc/rail/program/...n-the-Move.pdf).
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Old April 24th, 2014, 11:11 AM   #224
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Their conference only includes JR, subways and major private railways ignoring all the minor railways (often with only one line). It also has a narrower definition of greater Tokyo (calling it the "urban transportation area"). A quick "source" for you would be a link I have given you a few times

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...8Kant.C5.8D.29 click the "show"

This is the page quashlo made (and I helped him with) since there was no comprehensive english page anywhere on the internet that accurately has information on all the urban rail in Japan, especially with direct sources.
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Last edited by ukiyo; April 24th, 2014 at 11:16 AM.
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Old April 24th, 2014, 11:13 AM   #225
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Aha, I couldn't find that page in my brief search. Thanks for reminding me (head like a sieve for things like that). Sorry.

I think your page also extends a lot further out than the Tokyo Metro presentation too. They list JR as having a network of 887km, whereas your link shows 2279km (for example).
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Old April 24th, 2014, 11:23 AM   #226
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Yep, that is explained in the note "o"
Quote:
Defined here as JR East's Tokyo Suburban Area (東京近郊区間) for fare calculation purposes, and roughly correlating with the Suica coverage area (as of 2012.03.17). However, Suica coverage does not extend to the Karasuyama Line, Kashima Line, and Kururi Line, which are considered part of the Tokyo Suburban Area.
I think the only ones that you could really be careful about are the "Other minor railways" section which is mostly lines in cities loosely part of the greater Tokyo "exurb" area, though subtracting all their numbers from what I posted barely changes anything.
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Old April 24th, 2014, 11:30 AM   #227
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo View Post
Yep, that is explained in the note "o"


I think the only ones that you could really be careful about are the "Other minor railways" section which is mostly lines in cities loosely part of the greater Tokyo "exurb" area, though subtracting all their numbers from what I posted barely changes anything.
I just noticed you edited your initial post to include that note about the Tokyo urban transport area. I guess I should learn not to reply so fast in future.

I guess you haven't had the time or energy to put together a list of rolling stock across Greater Tokyo in its entirety? I know that I don't have the expertise (or time) to do that.
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Old April 24th, 2014, 11:37 AM   #228
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^ I wouldn't be able to do that

BTW I calculated all the ridership figures of the 11 biggest operators in Greater Tokyo and put it on the wikipedia page here as well if anyone is interested: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transpo...okyo#Ridership

It was kind of redundant to do that when I just could post the total released by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism for the "Tokyo Metropolitan Area":http://www.mlit.go.jp/kisha/kisha07/01/010330_3/01.pdf Their figure btw in case you can't find it is 39.481 million passengers a day.
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Last edited by ukiyo; April 24th, 2014 at 11:58 AM.
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:26 PM   #229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo View Post
For all urban rail there are 49 operators, 146 lines, 4,714.7 km and there are 2,141 stations.
I have a question concerning these mind-boggling numbers.

Are all tracks and platforms counted once or not?
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Old April 26th, 2014, 06:47 AM   #230
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^ Check the wiki link for all the explanations and definitions
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Old April 26th, 2014, 11:00 PM   #231
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I've done it but still didn't find the answers.
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Old May 7th, 2014, 12:47 AM   #232
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Here is a review of what's going on at Shibuya Station

Shibuya Station maze to get untangled
Quote:
The Yomiuri Shimbun



Shibuya Station is used by more than 3 million people daily, but its labyrinthine layout and the distance between the lines passing through the station can make changing trains a test of endurance. A major renovation project that started this spring should make getting around the huge terminal station easier—although it will not be completed until fiscal 2027.

“I use the moving walkways, but it still takes six or seven minutes to get to my next train,” a weary 24-year-old female company employee returning home to Toda, Saitama Prefecture, said on Wednesday evening after she transferred from the JR Yamanote Line to the Saikyo Line. “I feel like I’ve walked to the next station.”

Since Shibuya Station opened in 1885, the addition of new lines has involved major expansion and remodeling work wherever space allowed. The end result is the station’s current maze-like structure and a patchwork of train facilities cobbled together in the heart of Tokyo’s trendy Shibuya district. Because there was not enough land for the Saikyo Line platforms alongside existing platforms, they were constructed about 350 meters south. Transferring to other lines requires traversing a long connecting walkway.

East Japan Railway Co. and Tokyo Metro Co. are among the four operators whose lines pass through Shibuya Station. Adding to the confusion, the vertical distance between the station’s highest and lowest platforms is unusually great. The Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin subway line is located five floors underground. Platforms of the Ginza subway line, which began operations before World War II, are actually three floors above ground. The height gap between these lines is about 40 meters, which is one reason why efforts to make the station barrier-free for commuters in wheelchairs and with mobility difficulties has lagged so far behind such improvements at other major stations.

“Many people have complained that the station is difficult to navigate. This major redevelopment should finally make it more convenient and easier to get around,” a JR East official involved in the project said.

Platforms brought closer



This major overhaul of Shibuya Station could finally begin because the platforms of the Tokyu Toyoko Line were shifted underground when the line started direct connections with the Fukutoshin Line in March 2013, which created a vast open area. Preliminary construction work for the new platforms of the Saikyo Line in this space—350 meters from where they currently stand—started in April.

The Yamanote Line, a loop around central Tokyo, has two separate platforms for its clockwise and counterclockwise runs. Under the reconstruction plan, the loop line will instead have a single island platform. Although the inconvenient vertical differences among the connecting lines will remain, the total distance between them will be significantly reduced.

Demolition of part of the Tokyu department store that formed part of the east side of the station building has started.

Eventually, three skyscrapers, including a 46-story building, will be built above the platforms. To accommodate this, the Ginza subway line platforms, which are currently ensconced inside the department store building, will be moved about 130 meters toward Omotesando Station.

Hachiko on the move?

The sheer scale of the planned renovation of such a massive terminal station creates another headache: When can the work be done while minimizing disruptions to train services and passengers?

Train schedules cannot be easily changed, so construction of the new platforms and other facilities can basically only proceed at night between the last and first trains. The entire project, including the skyscrapers, is due to be completed in fiscal 2027—seven years after the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympic Games.

The area around Shibuya Station also is undergoing a major facelift. Redevelopment projects include the construction of a skyscraper in an area south of the station. The open space just west of the station, a popular meeting place and the site of the iconic Hachiko dog statue, will be renovated. This famous space will become considerably wider as it will be integrated with the adjoining bus terminal site. Hachiko’s new home has yet to be decided.

“We’ll consider where to place the statue once the outline of the area has been decided,” a Shibuya Ward spokesman involved in the project said.

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001251845
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Old May 7th, 2014, 12:02 PM   #233
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I think the Ginza line redesign will be one of the most important projects as part of this package. The Ginza line is currently really badly located compared to the other lines and it always felt like a squeeze to get up there in rush hour due to tight corridors.
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Old May 9th, 2014, 07:35 AM   #234
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I really wish I had a time machine so I could go back and tell the Ginza line and Inokashira line designers about how through servicing works... or at least get the Ginza line to adopt pantographs and maybe narrow gauge.

…oh well.

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Old May 9th, 2014, 02:34 PM   #235
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Indeed. Plus the Ginza and Marunouchi Line to adopt longer trains too rather than six carriage services.
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Old May 12th, 2014, 06:55 PM   #236
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
I really wish I had a time machine so I could go back and tell the Ginza line and Inokashira line designers about how through servicing works... or at least get the Ginza line to adopt pantographs and maybe narrow gauge.

…oh well.

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I agree about through running but I do not believe that just forcing standard rolling stock on the Ginza line would work. The tunnels are too small. Instead, joining the two based mostly on Ginza Line standards would seem to make more sense.

Train length: platforms and train lengths on the Ginza Line and Inokashira Line are already almost exactly the same.

Loading gauge: Ginza Line trains are narrower and shorter and have to negotiate sharper curves, so adopt the loading gauge, and, essentially the rolling stock, of the Ginza Line. It is much easier to shift some rails closer to the platform than it is to widen the Ginza Line tunnels.

Platform height: Ginza line platforms are lower. So, just raise the rails a bit at the Inokashira Line stations by adding more ballast beneath the rails for ground level stations. The platforms will probably have to be rebuilt for elevated stations.

Rail gauge: This is a tough one. If the bridges on the Inokashira line can support standard gauge rails, then this is the way to go, since it will allow using the Ginza Line rolling stock as-is and to keep the connection with the Marunouchi Line; but if not, then convert the Ginza Line to narrow gauge. Probably the Ginza Line rolling stock could be modified to narrow gauge by replacing the trucks.

Power: This is another tricky one. Converting the Ginza line to catenary operations would probably not be possible given the tight clearances of the tunnels. Dual mode trainsets are another possibility but fitting the pantographs into the tunnel, even in a retracted state, would be difficult, given the already tight clearances and small loading gauge, plus it would require new rolling stock. The solution I like best would be to convert the Inokashira line to third rail, but the grade crossings may complicate things. Grade crossings with third rail, even in very dense urban environments, do exist elsewhere in the world (Chicago for example) but not in Japan to the best of my knowledge. If that barrier cannot be overcome, perhaps this project would have to wait for a continuous grade separation project of the Inokashira line.

Perhaps the biggest challenge of all would be the connection in the vicinity of Shibuya. The Inokashira Line station is on the 2nd floor of the Shibuya Mark City complex while the Ginza Line is on the 3rd floor. Building a connection without demolishing these massive, complicated, and fairly new buildings would be an engineering challenge to say the least.

I wrote a bit more on this in other posts before. The general consensus seemed to be that it wouldn't be worth the trouble or expense given current ridership patterns.
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Old May 17th, 2014, 07:15 PM   #237
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I'd like to know why the Izuhakone Sunzu Line is not included in this count. It gets some through service from Tokyo, and some commuter runs connect to it. The Fujikyu gets included, so why not this?

Also, I'd like some information on the more obscure communities in the mountainous part of western Tokyo, where it's basically small villages. What are the bus routes out there like?

Also, does anyone have the max train per hour for the Tohoku, Saikyo, and Shonan-Shinjuku Lines?
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Old May 18th, 2014, 07:02 AM   #238
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Quote:
Also, does anyone have the max train per hour for the Tohoku, Saikyo, and Shonan-Shinjuku Lines?
Saikyo Line (8am~9am): 17tph, ~4 min. headways (at Akabane, up direction)

Shonan-Shinjuku Line (8am~9am): 6tph (at Akabane, Ofuna direction)

Tohoku Line (8am~9am): 9tph (at Akabane, up direction)
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Old May 18th, 2014, 07:17 AM   #239
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Quote:
Also, I'd like some information on the more obscure communities in the mountainous part of western Tokyo, where it's basically small villages. What are the bus routes out there like?
The main provider of service is Nishi Tokyo Bus. Their route map is here:
http://www.nisitokyobus.co.jp/rosen/...p_20140401.pdf

Toei Bus also has a group of services radiating out of Oume Station, quite isolated from their core services serving the inner of the 23 wards of Tokyo.
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Old May 18th, 2014, 07:41 AM   #240
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Tokyo Metro. Tobu Railway announce plans to introduce 20m rollling stock on Hibiya/Isezaki Lines

Last month, Tokyo Metro and Tobu Railway revealed plans to introduce new rolling stock on the Hibiya Line and Tobu Skytree Line (Isezaki Line) run-through services. These will be standardized 20m length stock, with four doors per car. Current rolling stock is 18m length, with both 5 door and 3 door configurations. Introduction of standard length cars with 4 doors/side will allow the installation of platform doors at all Hibiya Line stations. The new rolling stock will be introduced between FY2016~2019.

http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2014/p...140430_h93.pdf

Current stock used on these services (18m length):
Tobu 20000 series (20050 subseries)


Tokyo Metro 03 series
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