daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 11th, 2016, 05:43 PM   #741
luacstjh98
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,359
Likes (Received): 289

And also, due to the diversity of the various through-running rolling stock, CBTC isn't an option, right?

---

This is just me thinking out loud, but perhaps the Tamagawa Line could be upgraded for 6-cars as part of a future grade separation project?
__________________
Doors closing. Please stand clear of all train doors.

I have a bad habit of retroactively editing my posts without prior warning.

Last edited by luacstjh98; September 11th, 2016 at 05:53 PM.
luacstjh98 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 11th, 2016, 06:10 PM   #742
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 776
Likes (Received): 469

Each one of the 5 operating company's brand of ATS/ATC is onboard every trainset for thar corridor. So CBTC could go into operation but only on a company-by-company basis.

As for the Tamagawa line being upgraded, the connections to the Toyoko/Meguro Line exist between Den-en-Chofu and Tamagawa stations already but are used in non revenue situations. The Tamagawa line like it's sister Ikenoue line used to be a tram line that got upgraded, hence the tiny platforms. What will likely happen is if the Kamata-Shin Kamata-Haneda link is built, there will be service coming off the Toyoko/Meguro Lines that will skip all stops on the Tamagawa line except Kamata...If it gets built.
__________________

lucas_94 liked this post
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2016, 07:57 AM   #743
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Ironically, the Fukutoshin Line was, in many ways, effectively quad-tracking the Yamanote Line (or more, if you want to include the Saikyō Line)… It was planned and built expressly as a relief line for the Yamanote Line between Ikebukuro and Shibuya.

Regarding the Sōtetsu through-services with JR, the Saikyō Line is definitely a better “match” to Sōtetsu… Both are 10-car formations (Sōtetsu is technically a mix of 8- and 10-car, but basically 100% compatible), and many of the Saikyō Line trains just terminate at Shinjuku currently. The Shōnan‒Shinjuku Line is really more cross-regional in scope, plus the mix of 10- and 15-car formations, with all trains having two green cars sandwiched in, just doesn’t really match well with Sōtetsu’s operations. Same goes for the Yokosuka Line. There’s some stuff floating around the web that the reason they have so many Saikyō Line trains terminating at Shinjuku is because there’s a grade crossing near Yoyogi and that JR is hesitant to run more trains further south because of neighborhood opposition when they first brought passenger service onto the Yamanote Freight Line. Not sure if I believe that—I think the lack of capacity to hold and turn back trains south of Shinjuku seems like more of a legitimate issue.

Anyways, what will be interesting to see is what they do to the existing traffic on the Shōnan‒Shinjuku Line and Yokosuka Line in order to accommodate the Sōtetsu through-services… There is a flat junction at Hebikubo (蛇窪) (and, similar, but less critical ones at Ōsaki and Megurogawa) that complicates train scheduling:



If you look at the schedule at Nishi-Ōi, which is just west of Hebikubo, there is basically nowhere to add a train, as they’ve pretty much reached the limit of ~20 tph for a two-track line with branches and mixed stopping patterns. JR does some really creative timetabling, though, as you can see they try and pair Shōnan‒Shinjuku Line trains in each direction so they pass through Hebikubo at approximately the same time to eliminate conflicts and minimize delays while waiting for the switches to clear:

Code:
NORTHBOUND (departures or passes)            SOUTHBOUND (arrivals / passes)
===========================================  ==============================
 Time  Ln Type            Destination         Time  Ln Type   Destination
====== == ==============  =================  ====== == =====  ===========
                                              0731  SS Local  Ōfuna
 0731  Y  Local           Chiba              
 0739  Y  Local           Tsudanuma           0738  Y  Local  Kurihama
 0742  SS Local           Koganei
(0746) Y  Narita Express  Narita Airport
 0749  Y  Local           Tsudanuma           0748  Y  Local  Zushi
(0752) SS Rapid           Takasaki           (0752) SS Rapid  Hiratsuka
 0755  Y  Airport Narita  Narita Airport      0755  Y  Local  Kurihama
(0758) Y  Shōnan Liner    Tōkyō               0758  Y  Local  Ōfuna
 0800  SS Local           Utsunomiya          0802  SS Local  Ōfuna
 0802  Y  Local           Chiba
 0805  Y  Local           Tsudanuma           0805  Y  Local  Zushi
(0808) SS Rapid           Kagohara            0808  Y  Local  Ōfuna
                                             (0810) SS Rapid  Odawara
 0811  Y  Local           Chiba
(0814) SS Ohayō Liner     Shinjuku
 0817  Y  Local           Chiba               0817  Y  Local  Kurihama
 0820  SS Local           Koganei             0821  SS Local  Ōfuna
 0823  Y  Local           Chiba
(0825) Y  Shōnan Liner    Tōkyō               0825  Y  Local  Zushi
(0828) SS Rapid           Takasaki           (0827) SS Rapid  Kōzu
 0831  Y  Local           Kazusa Ichinomiya   0831  Y  Local  Zushi
(0835) Y  Shōnan Liner    Shinagawa           0834  SS Local  Zushi
 0838  Y  Local           Kimitsu             0837  Y  Local  Ōfuna
                                              0840  Y  Local  Kurihama
 0840  SS Local           Koganei            (0842) SS Rapid  Hiratsuka
(0843) Y  Narita Express  Narita Airport
(0845) SS Ohayō Liner     Shinjuku
                                              0847  Y  Local  Ōfuna
 0849  Y  Local           Tsudanuma
 0851  SS Rapid           Utsunomiya          0850  SS Local  Ōfuna
As long as they hold the total of ~20 tph relatively constant, presumably they might be able to shift some of the slots around among the Yokosuka Line, Shōnan–Shinjuku Line, and Saikyō Line, even increasing the trains to / from Ōsaki and Shibuya by using the scheduling principle above. All Shōnan–Shinjuku Line trains on the Tōkaidō Main Line – Takasaki Line route are already 15 cars during the peaks, but there are still some 10-car trains on the other route (Yokosuka Line – Utsunomiya Line) and 11-car trains on the Yokosuka Line as far as I can tell, so if you take away some slots from these lines and give them to Sōtetsu and the Saikyō Line, they may be able to make some of the remaining trains longer to compensate (assuming they have enough spare 4- and 5-car sets).

The ultimate solution to all of this was a plan called the 大崎短絡線 (Ōsaki Connector) to build a new turnout that would remove the track conflicts at this location but it seems virtually impossible that this will be built in the near-future with all the redevelopment happening at Ōsaki, the tight curves, the existing houses that come right up to the tracks, and the Tōkaidō Shinkasen viaduct overhead.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2016, 08:23 AM   #744
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Found this on YouTube... I think it's old and probably not news to some people, but figured some people might like it since it's actually in English. There is an added bonus of some scenes at last year's MTIJ.

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

dimlys1994 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2016, 09:27 AM   #745
luacstjh98
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,359
Likes (Received): 289

I would think that it wouldn't be easy to eliminate the grade crossing at Yoyogi.

Short of suspending all services on the Yamanote Freight Line, while a Ueno-Tokyo-Line-like structure is built to bridge over the Chuo Line tracks and/or Yoyogi Station.

And by the looks of it, I don't think trains can terminate at Osaki either...

EDIT: This is just me thinking, but would it be possible that a link be built through the Osaki Depot, linking Osaki to Oimachi on the Tokaido/Keihin-Tohoku lines, so that Shonan-Shinjuku Line trains can use the Tokaido Line to Yokohama and southward instead?
__________________
Doors closing. Please stand clear of all train doors.

I have a bad habit of retroactively editing my posts without prior warning.

Last edited by luacstjh98; September 12th, 2016 at 11:15 AM.
luacstjh98 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2016, 10:11 PM   #746
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

If you are talking about moving both directions of the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line onto the Tōkaidō Line, that would be difficult, as the Tōkaidō Line schedule is already パンパン (i.e., stuffed).

There is nowhere to fit the northbound Shōnan–Shinjuku Line trains into the Tōkaidō Line schedule… This is one of the reasons that the Jōban Line trains that actually make it all the way down to Shinagawa in the morning end up sitting at Tamachi all day until the evening rush arrives—there is nowhere to slip them in and have them head back northbound to the Jōban Line until after 9:00 AM or so.

Compare the northbound Tōkaidō Line schedule at Shinagawa, which has ~18 tph during the peak:
http://www.jreast-timetable.jp/1609/...8/0788040.html

With the northbound Jōban Line schedule at Shinagawa, which has a fat three-hour block in the morning with no trains:
http://www.jreast-timetable.jp/1609/...8/0788110.html

The conflict at Hebikubo is just between two directions—northbound Shōnan–Shinjuku Line and southbound Yokosuka Line—so the easiest solution would be something that is targeted to resolve this conflict (i.e., the Ōsaki Connector). Eliminating the conflict allows you to simplify the timetable because the two tracks can be operated fully independently, which may gain you a couple more slots in the schedule (which could then be given to Sōtetsu).

Left is current conditions, right is with the new connector:



This image is from a feasibility study done 10+ years ago by JR that goes into some detail about all of the various constraints: http://library.jsce.or.jp/jsce/open/...32-04-0005.pdf.

To minimize impacts to the surrounding neighborhood, they assumed a connection with the smallest, tightest turnout possible, resulting in a 160-m radius curve and 3.5% grade, which would limit speed to 40 km/h. They would still need to keep the flat junction for freight trains, but all passenger service would use the new connection.

As you can see on Google Map aerials, though, the west side of Ōsaki Station has changed dramatically since then due to massive redevelopment, and there are some new mid-rise apartment buildings in the way that could complicate things.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

Heavenly Field liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 12:36 AM   #747
Rodalvesdepaula
Scooter/motorbike lover
 
Rodalvesdepaula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Sorocaba (SP), Brazil
Posts: 49,562
Likes (Received): 40911

Is it possible to eliminate all freight trains on Yamanote Freight Line? Freght trains could use only Musashino Line to cross Tokyo Metropolitan Area and Yamanote Freight Line could be converted to a possible "semi-express" Yamanote Line service with 6 trains per hour stopping only in Tokyo, Shinagawa, Meguro, Shibuya, Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, Otsuka, Nippori, Ueno and Akihabara.
__________________

Rodalvesdepaula no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 01:04 AM   #748
00Zy99
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,980
Likes (Received): 1507

The Yamanote Freight Line doesn't extend all the way around the loop as a second set of tracks. In fact, it pretty much exists only on the west side. And that segment has already become quite busy with passenger traffic.

There is little need for an express Yamanote anyways. If you want to cut across the loop, you use different lines.
__________________

Rodalvesdepaula liked this post
00Zy99 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 11:25 AM   #749
Jekmo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 5
Likes (Received): 0

Elevataed stations integrated in buildings - Need help examples

Hi

I'm looking for examples with elevated stations which is integrated in buildings.
I have one example with Kokura station, but I hope you can help me find more?
Btw it does not necessarily be in Japan only.

Thanks
Jekmo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 11:30 AM   #750
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 776
Likes (Received): 469

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jekmo View Post
Hi

I'm looking for examples with elevated stations which is integrated in buildings.
I have one example with Kokura station, but I hope you can help me find more?
Btw it does not necessarily be in Japan only.

Thanks
Many of the elevated stations here are buildings in their own right, like JR Akihabara station and Keikyu Kamata. What do you mean by integrated into buildings?
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 11:52 AM   #751
Jekmo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 5
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
Many of the elevated stations here are buildings in their own right, like JR Akihabara station and Keikyu Kamata. What do you mean by integrated into buildings?
I'm mainly thinking of examples where the construction of both the elevated station and a building (for intance an office building or a mall) is done as one construction. Thereby the station is integrated in the building and the rails go through the building. Does that help?

Another example could be Knight Center Station in Miami. Unfortunately I can't post links or pictures on this site yet, so you have to google it.
Jekmo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 12:07 PM   #752
luacstjh98
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,359
Likes (Received): 289

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post

This image is from a feasibility study done 10+ years ago by JR that goes into some detail about all of the various constraints: http://library.jsce.or.jp/jsce/open/...32-04-0005.pdf.

To minimize impacts to the surrounding neighborhood, they assumed a connection with the smallest, tightest turnout possible, resulting in a 160-m radius curve and 3.5% grade, which would limit speed to 40 km/h. They would still need to keep the flat junction for freight trains, but all passenger service would use the new connection.

As you can see on Google Map aerials, though, the west side of Ōsaki Station has changed dramatically since then due to massive redevelopment, and there are some new mid-rise apartment buildings in the way that could complicate things.
Thanks for the insight.

Isn't there a curve currently used by Chuo Line- and Omiya-bound Narita Express trains to turn off the Yokosuka Line and onto the Yamanote Line?

I'm thinking that northbound Shonan-Shinjuku Line trains could use that curve, then use a single track to connect from the Yokosuka Line, mostly over the existing railway right-of-way.

However, this would mean that either northbound Shonan-Shinjuku Line trains will have to either skip Osaki station (a situation like West India Quay DLR), or a platform built on this curve if space allows. But I don't think such a platform would be able to berth a 15-car train.
__________________
Doors closing. Please stand clear of all train doors.

I have a bad habit of retroactively editing my posts without prior warning.

Last edited by luacstjh98; September 13th, 2016 at 12:14 PM.
luacstjh98 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 05:20 PM   #753
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

OK, borrowing the track diagram from above, I assume you want to have the northbound SSL trains (a hat-tip to London since you mentioned West India Quay DLR) continue through Hebikubo on the Yokosuka Line (shown as “Hinkaku Line” in the diagram), find a way to get them onto the correct track Yokosuka Line track, and then take the turnout used by the NEX trains onto the Yamanote Freight Line, bypassing Ōsaki.



Using a simple crossover to reverse the train onto the correct track isn’t ideal though, as you will be stopping traffic in at least one direction of the Yokosuka Line while the train changes directions. You would also probably need a second crew on-board to do this maneuver quickest (typically, the conductor at the rear of the train is not trained as an operator).

Best place to do a reverse maneuver would be at a station or other location where there is a third track or pocket track… JR East made some improvements at Shinagawa a couple of years ago to improve the track layout and add a new platform for the Yokosuka Line, so there is a lightly-used third track and platform (Platform 14) where the northbound SSL trains could enter and reverse onto the correct Yokosuka Line track without disrupting service in either direction. This is a huge detour and time penalty, though.

Assuming this is acceptable, you would still have a new conflict at Ōsaki, where the northbound SSL train crosses paths with southbound SSL trains coming into Ōsaki.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

ko7 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 05:39 PM   #754
luacstjh98
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,359
Likes (Received): 289

How about this?



where the purple line is the resited Osaki Connector, and the unlabeled rectangle a potential additional platform on the 2nd floor.

Also, I don't remember seeing anything in the proposal about eliminating the level crossing at the northern approach into Osaki. Mainly because the north ticket gates are in the way of grade separation...
__________________
Doors closing. Please stand clear of all train doors.

I have a bad habit of retroactively editing my posts without prior warning.
luacstjh98 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 09:16 PM   #755
Rodalvesdepaula
Scooter/motorbike lover
 
Rodalvesdepaula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Sorocaba (SP), Brazil
Posts: 49,562
Likes (Received): 40911

This proposed connection isn't possible. there aren't enough space: two residential towers are located on the left of Yokosuka Line/Tokaido Shinkansen in Osaki.

My purporse is a tunnel between Nishi-Shinagawa (after Tokyu Oimachi Line crossing) and Yamanote Freight Line, with underground platforms in Osaki Station for Sotetsu and Shonan-Shinjuku lines trains.
__________________

Rodalvesdepaula no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 11:52 PM   #756
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Here’s a fairly crude overlay of what the original proposal would look like on an aerial image (sorry for the image size, but it gets hard to see the detail without getting this close up):



At first glance, it still looks doable. You would need to demolish the smaller apartment building at the SW corner of that small block, as well as the two-story temp structure at the NW corner. The latter one may not even be there any more, as it looks to be the construction field office for the new replacement footbridge (shows up as bright white in the aerial) that crosses over the tracks, which was completed last year. Would also need to substantially modify the roadways on the west side of the tracks both horizontally and vertically, but the adjacent properties have a fair amount of setback, so it doesn’t seem impossible.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

Rodalvesdepaula, ko7 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2016, 11:53 PM   #757
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Interesting article about a proposed sightseeing tram between Ikebukuro Station and Sunshine City:
http://toyokeizai.net/articles/-/135204

Synopsis:

Quote:
In its urban planning vision and guidelines for the Ikebukuro Station area for 2035, Toshima Ward incorporated an “LRT” system looping between the station’s East Exit and the Sunshine City (サンシャインシティ) complex. Currently, the East Exit of the station fronts onto Meiji-dōri and is flooded with automobile traffic, but after completion of a bypass in FY2019, Toshima Ward hopes to convert the streets near the station into pedestrian plazas.

While one of the larger hubs in Tōkyō, Ikebukuro has always been somewhat under the radar, lurking in the shadows of Shinjuku and Shibuya. However, the area had historically been a haven for young artists prior to WWII, earning it the nickname “Ikebukuro Montparnasse”. Recently, Toshima Ward has been getting a lot of press after opening their new City Hall building last year and with Koike Yuriko, the former representative of the local Tōkyō 10th district, being elected as Governor of Tōkyō in July. Lately, there’s also been a lot of anime shops popping up near Sunshine City.

Toshima Ward isn’t billing this as a transportation solution, though—instead, they are billing it as a “sightseeing” tram for visitors coming to Ikebukuro, and want to offer something new that can’t be found elsewhere in Japan. One idea they have is to do double-decker trams, with the upper level like a café offering food and refreshments like beer. Trams would be battery-powered to avoid running into vertical clearance issues associated with double-decker trams powered by overhead lines.

Estimated cost to introduce the system would be ¥8.5 billion, with the ward government responsible for the ¥8.0 billion share related to constructing the necessary infrastructure (of which half would be assembled from national government funding). The remaining ¥500 million would be borne by the private sector.

They have yet to do any formal financial analysis, but have hired a railway consultant, and believe there is no reason that they won’t be able to attract riders given the 2.5 million plus passengers at Ikebukuro and the almost 100,000 visitors to Sunshine City daily. They could even have it connect into the Toden Arakawa Line, providing a direct connection between Ikebukuro and Waseda University.

As most of the route follows streets owned by the ward, there is basically no need to acquire land or ROW, although they will need to obtain permission to operate the tram from the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government where the route would cross roads owned by the TMG. While negotiations have been running into some difficulties, there is some hope that things will proceed smoother now that their previous district representative has been elected as the governor.
Route:



There is a running joke that Ikebukuro is full of people from Saitama, and that it’s effectively an extension of Saitama. Another joke is that it’s sort of a “stepping stone” where suburban teenagers can get their feet wet and get adjusted to the big city before they go to Shinjuku or Shibuya. Lately though, there’s a lot more interest among female anime fans who are looking for a place more welcoming than Akihabara, which is mostly geared towards the stereotypical male otaku (オタク).

I’m glad to see Ikebukuro getting a bit more of the respect it deserves, but don’t necessarily think it needs a gimmicky solution like a beer tram. Plus, the walk from the station to Sunshine City is really nice—lots of foot traffic and street activity, and it only takes about 10 minutes or so. I might ride a sightseeing tram once to try it out (although I don’t think there’s really much to “sightsee” on the route they’re showing, since those streets are not very attractive). After that, I’d probably go back to walking.



Might be more interested if they could somehow link it with the Arakawa Line from the get-go… The line is still losing ridership year after year, so an extension could be the shot in the arm it needs.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2016, 12:12 AM   #758
Rodalvesdepaula
Scooter/motorbike lover
 
Rodalvesdepaula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Sorocaba (SP), Brazil
Posts: 49,562
Likes (Received): 40911

An APS-powered streetcar could be a nice option for Ikebukuro LRT.
__________________

Rodalvesdepaula no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2016, 12:15 AM   #759
Rodalvesdepaula
Scooter/motorbike lover
 
Rodalvesdepaula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Sorocaba (SP), Brazil
Posts: 49,562
Likes (Received): 40911

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Here’s a fairly crude overlay of what the original proposal would look like on an aerial image (sorry for the image size, but it gets hard to see the detail without getting this close up):



At first glance, it still looks doable. You would need to demolish the smaller apartment building at the SW corner of that small block, as well as the two-story temp structure at the NW corner. The latter one may not even be there any more, as it looks to be the construction field office for the new replacement footbridge (shows up as bright white in the aerial) that crosses over the tracks, which was completed last year. Would also need to substantially modify the roadways on the west side of the tracks both horizontally and vertically, but the adjacent properties have a fair amount of setback, so it doesn’t seem impossible.
However, this project is economically viable? Lands in Tokyo are extremely expensive and the demolition of these houses would be a prohibitive cost. A tunnel and new underground platforms in Osaki Station can be a more cheap option.
__________________

Rodalvesdepaula no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2016, 01:28 AM   #760
Heavenly Field
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Shinagawa
Posts: 57
Likes (Received): 90

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
At first glance, it still looks doable. You would need to demolish the smaller apartment building at the SW corner of that small block, as well as the two-story temp structure at the NW corner. The latter one may not even be there any more, as it looks to be the construction field office for the new replacement footbridge (shows up as bright white in the aerial) that crosses over the tracks, which was completed last year. Would also need to substantially modify the roadways on the west side of the tracks both horizontally and vertically, but the adjacent properties have a fair amount of setback, so it doesn’t seem impossible.
It's hard to see from an overhead angle, but there's quite a bit of vertical separation as well. I don't think it's prohibitive, but it does further complicate matters.
Heavenly Field no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
chiba monorail, jr east, keio, keisei, metro, odakyu, seibu, tama monorail, tobu, toei subway, tokyo, tokyo metro, tokyu, yamanote

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium