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Old September 17th, 2016, 08:17 PM   #781
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Odakyū CMs





Seibu CM
This one follows Matayoshi Naoki, a well-known comedian and author, as he visits Chichibu in search of material for his new book.

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Old September 17th, 2016, 08:19 PM   #782
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An episode of TV program “Hamachan ga!” (浜ちゃんが!) from earlier this year, where Ichikawa Saya (市川紗椰), a model who is a well-known tetsuko (鉄子, female railfan), takes the hosts on a tour of Chiyoda Line trains at Ayase Yard and tries to convert them into railfans.

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Old September 17th, 2016, 08:21 PM   #783
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New Seibu “manner” (i.e., rider etiquette) poster styled like an ukiyo-e (浮世絵). Love the depiction of the oiran (花魁)—perhaps an analogy to modern-day gyaru doing make-up on the train.
http://www.seibu-group.co.jp/railway...5_mannerup.pdf

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Old September 17th, 2016, 08:22 PM   #784
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Tōkyū to launch webcam system to allow passengers to check station crowding
http://www.tokyu.co.jp/file/160915-3.pdf

Tōkyū will launch a new service called Ekishi-vision that will share real-time images of crowding conditions inside stations with passengers. The service will cover 60 stations starting in early October, gradually expanding to all stations on the Tōkyū network (excepting the Kodomo no Kuni Line and Setagaya Line) by early FY2018.

The system uses image processing technology from Hitachi to capture and post-process real-time images from station CCTV cameras. To protect privacy rights, the technology converts people in the images into generic icons. The images are then made available to users of Tōkyū’s smartphone app and the TV Push (テレビ・プッシュ) automatic messaging service provided by Tōkyū subsidiaries iTSCOM (イッツ・コミュニケーションズ) and Cable Television Shinagawa (ケーブルテレビ品川).

The service will allow passengers to quickly and visually confirm the level of crowding inside stations, and is expected to be particularly useful during major service disruptions, helping passengers make decisions to use alternative routes or to reschedule or avoid travel. Tōkyū has been testing the service at 6 stations including Mizonokuchi since March and was able to confirm the integrity of the technology. Passengers gave the service high marks during subsequent surveys, and the railway noticed increased usage of the service during major delays, special events, and other situations.



Tōkyū is by far the busiest private railway in Tōkyō, with over 3 million daily passengers—I like to think of them as “half of a Tōkyō Metro” in terms of ridership and network size. Keiō is the only one that comes anywhere close to the passenger densities, and it only does about 1.7 million a day with a network that is only slightly smaller than Tōkyū’s.

Anyways, this should be an interesting service, and a really simple way to give passengers options… For the same reasons, I generally prefer looking out my window or checking online webcams to see what the weather is like, instead of just checking the forecast. It’s not clear from the press release if this is only for cameras at the faregates, but would be nice if it also covered the platforms, which is a better indication of the actual level of crowding, assuming they could update the images frequently enough. Views of the faregates would mostly be useful to confirm whether or not there is a major service disruption—not of much use at other times.
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Old September 17th, 2016, 08:23 PM   #785
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JR East to carry out major trackwork at Shinagawa November 19–20
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2016/t...160913_t03.pdf

This is the next milestone in the trackwork modifications at JR Shinagawa Station and adjacent Tamachi yard to make way for redevelopment and a new station on the Yamanote Line and Keihin‒Tōhoku Line. Platforms 6 and 7 are currently out of service due to construction, but will be put back in service in their new position and alignment, while Platform 5 will now be taken out of service. Currently, inbound Tōkaidō Line trains use Platforms 5 and 8, but with this change, it will be Platforms 6 through 8.

Service will be affected between Saturday (Nov 19) 10:20 and Sunday (Nov 20) 06:20. During this period, all Jōban Line trains will terminate at Ueno. Between Saturday 14:20 and end of service, northbound Tōkaidō Line trains will turn back at Shinagawa, while southbound Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line trains on the Ueno–Tōkyō Line will turn back at Tōkyō. On Sunday from start of service to 06:20, these changes will continue to be in effect, except that northbound Tōkaidō Line trains will use the Yokosuka Line to reach Shinagawa (i.e., via Musashi Kosugi instead of Kawasaki).

They will do switchouts at four locations:
Solid blue = Will be completed before the switchout
Dotted red = Will be completed in the switchout
Dotted orange = Will be removed in the switchout
Dot + bar orange = Will be removed later

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Old September 17th, 2016, 08:25 PM   #786
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An interesting article about Seibu’s pre- and post-game operations for Seibu Lions home games at Seibu Prince Dome:
http://trafficnews.jp/post/57092/

General train service at Seibu Dome
Service to Seibu Dome is provided by the Sayama Line and Yamaguchi Line, which provide a combined total of 8 platforms at Seibu Kyūjō-mae Station. Normal midday operations on the Sayama Line involve a mix of 4- and 8-car trains operating 4 trips an hour on a single-track line, but the Sayama Line has a total of 6 platforms at Seibu Kyūjō-mae, each capable of handling a 10-car train.

The pre-game operations are generally fairly predictable because most games start at around the same times for day or night games. Post-game is more difficult to predict as it depends on how the game plays out, so Seibu keeps a few specialized operating scenarios on hand. In addition to the regular weekday and weekend schedules, Seibu also has three game-day scenarios for weekday night games, weekend day games, and weekend night games.

Typical gameday ridership
In 2015, Seibu Dome hosted 69 pro baseball games, with 7,500 average alightings for weekday night games and 14,000 alightings for weekend day or night games. Average game time is 3h 20m.

Peaking in station activity
During the busiest days, there are as many as 18,000 alightings at the station, which was the case for the day game against the Tōkyō Yakult Swallows on Saturday, June 13, 2015. Total stadium attendance was 32,876 and the game ended at 17:13. Seibu operated a total of 10 trains (including 1 express train) between 17:18 and 18:34, providing a total capacity of 19,000 passengers. Post-game boardings began to peak at around 17:20, with as many as 6,500 passengers passing through the faregates in the 20-minute period between 17:20 and 17:40. The peaking may vary from game-to-game depending on how well the Lions play, but peaking is generally focused on the first hour after game end.

Timetabling constraints
On game days, pre-game trains are operated to the stadium from Ikebukuro, Seibu Shinjuku, Hon-Kawagoe, Motomachi–Chūkagai, and Shin-Kiba. The layout at Nishi-Tokorozawa Station is critical in gameday operations because the line is single-track, although there are passing tracks at the intermediate station at Shimo-Yamaguchi. The line is limited to headways of about 7m 30s, or about 8 roundtrips an hour. There are also track conflicts at Nishi-Tokorozawa between inbound Sayama Line trains heading towards Ikebukuro and outbound Ikebukuro Line trains headed towards Chichibu. One of the Sayama Line platforms at the station is also limited to 8-car trains due to curves. These become the constraints in crafting a gameday schedule.

Gameday platform utilization
During gamedays, five of the six Sayama Line platforms at Seibu Dome are used to store post-game trains (four regular commuter sets and one Dome limited express). The single remaining platform is used to maintain the regular non-game operations on the line.

Timetabling principles
The stationmaster regularly follows game progress. When the game ends, Seibu Lions management notifies the stationmaster, who then decides which service pattern to operate and notifies the control center. There are 11 patterns for weekend night games, 14 patterns for weekend day games, and 9 patterns for weekend night games. All of the patterns are crafted to time the departures of post-game fast trains (e.g., Ikebukuro-bound expresses and rapids) with the end of the game.

Each pattern represents a potential scenario for game start / end times, broken into 10- to 15-minute blocks. Weekend day games, for example, typically begin at either 13:00 or 14:00, so Pattern 1 is for a post-game scenario beginning at 15:30, while Pattern 14 is for a post-game scenario beginning at 18:46. So in effect, the patterns can cover a 13:00 game that is up to 5 hours long (or a 14:00 game that is up to 4 hours long).

Through-services
Trains departing from Seibu Dome are bound for a variety of destinations, including Ikebukuro, Hōya, Kiyose, and Nishi-Tokorozawa on the Ikebukuro Line; Seibu-Shinjuku and Hon-Kawagoe on the Shinjuku Line; and Motomachi–Chūkagai and Shin-Kiba via Tōkyō Metro. There are fixed trains that depart regardless of game endtime and trains on the special service patterns that are timed specifically for post-game service. The former includes Shinjuku Line trains, trains traveling onto the Tōkyō Metro, and the Dome limited express, while the latter are lines that stay entirely within the Ikebukuro Line. Changing the timetables on the Shinjuku Line and other company’s lines to match game end is difficult.

Dome limited express schedule
Departures are fixed at 21:35 for weekday night games and 16:32 (for a 13:00 game) or 17:32 (for a 14:00) for weekend day games. Seibu could have a 400-passenger Dome train with a variable departure time at game end, but determined that the impacts to operations of the limited express platform at Ikebukuro Station and to how the railway sells limited express tickets make this option undesirable. However, Seibu did run a Dome service on a variable departure time once, during the 2013 Climax Series. In addition to fixed departure time Dome services, the railway experimented with variable departure time Dome services, running the latter in timetable slots typically reserved for rapid trains. This resulted in some peculiar situations, such as when this Dome service was passed by a Chichibu limited express.

Extra-inning games
In 2009, there were a lot of extra-inning games, including one in July that ended at 23:42. Seibu’s current gameday service patterns only began in March 2010—before that, the railway handled post-game traffic by operating more all-stop and semi-express trains. On that particular day, the game ended after the last regularly scheduled service at the stadium, so the railway hastily re-positioned out-of-service and deadheading trains to serve as post-game trains for Nishi-Tokorozawa. For games that are likely to be extended extra innings, Seibu broadcasts the schedule for the final trains of the day using the stadium PA system.

1990s gameday service patterns
In the 1990s, Seibu operated a much more complex gameday service pattern than now. At the time, the stadium did not have a roof, and Seibu had a special schedule just in case games were cancelled due to inclement weather or other factors. Because of the complexity, however, they subsequently switched to a simpler pattern, operating only all-stops and semi-expresses. Because of the wasted efficiency and the inability to operate expresses and rapids, however, the railway returned to a more complex gameday service pattern in 2010.

Non-baseball events
During concerts or other non-baseball events, the railway crafts a special event timetable based on information on the expected attendance provided by the event sponsor. Baseball game attendees tend to be concentrated along the Seibu network, but concert attendees tend to come from all across the region, and the share of attendees arriving by train increases. Seibu tries to stay flexible with special event timetables to respond to a variety of events ranging from concerts to cherry blossom viewing in Chichibu, the air show at JASDF Iruma Airbase, and the Chichibu Night Festival (秩父夜祭). Seibu is likely unmatched in the frequency with which they operate special event timetables.

Post-game operations at Seibu Kyūjō-mae:



Train operations at Nishi-Tokorozawa on a holiday gameday:

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Old September 18th, 2016, 07:32 AM   #787
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tunnel owl View Post
Imho a cheaper solution for PSD would be the breakthrough for existing stations.
Yes, it feels like we are still waiting for the “silver bullet” design that will minimize the cost and make it easier and quicker to upgrade existing platforms with doors. This one seems promising, as it looks fairly simple and cheap (in a good way).

For the time being, JR West seems to be satisfied with a rope-based design… First they tested a prototype version at Sakurajima on the Yumesaki Line starting in December 2013:



And earlier this year, they installed a “permanent” version at Takatsuki Station:



And since March 2015, JR East has already been testing out this bar-based design at Haijima, which appears to be similar to a separate prototype installation at Yayoidai (Sōtetsu Izumino Line). Perhaps they were not quite satisfied with this design, which led to the new prototype.



There was also a more elaborate rope-based prototype at Tsukimino, but no one seems to have adopted it yet:

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Old September 18th, 2016, 11:38 AM   #788
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Actually, that rope one is rather interesting. I've seen it in person here in Stockholm in fact. It's from a Korean company and is installed on the Daegu and Busan subways.

Here is a video of it in action being tested here in Stockholm on our tunnelbana (I took this one) and its comparison to two other door systems (the rope door is option 3).

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Old September 20th, 2016, 02:14 PM   #789
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An interesting article about some of the new governor’s ideas about improving the rail network. Definitely some out-of-the-box ideas, but probably leaning more towards pie-in-the-sky… I doubt any of these will go anywhere, and the money would probably be better spent on projects that the government and the railways have already identified. The only one that seems to be reasonable / feasible would be reducing the dwell times, which would actually help quite a bit, as there are more than a few lines where the bottlenecks are major stations with only two tracks where all the trains stop.
http://withnews.jp/article/f01609190...01qq000014036A

One of Governor Koike’s campaign promises was to eliminate overcrowded trains, and the article goes in-depth with the consulting firm that helped draft her transportation policy. Here are some of the key points:

Bi-level trains
One of the long-term ideas is to operate bi-level trains. This would be different than the existing bi-level rolling stock found in Japan (like JR East’s green cars) where there is a shared set of doors in the vestibules… Instead, these would be fully bi-level trains where each level can function independently and would be served by dedicated platforms.

They would achieve this by removing the pantograph and catenary and lowering the car floor for the bottom level by 30–40 cm. In order to allow for removal of the pantograph and catenary, propulsion systems and trains would be replaced with a linear motor-based system similar to the Toei Ōedo Line. In subways, the vertical clearance is limited, so they would make the upper level for seated passengers only (no standing). The lower platform levels would also end up being fairly cramped, with low ceiling heights.

The proposed bi-level trains would not be permitted on lines with smaller loading gauges like the Marunouchi Line, Ginza Line, and the various linear motor subways. The ability to run through-services would be limited, but they feel that most passengers would choose to reduce overcrowding if given the choice of reducing overcrowding or permitting / maintaining through-services.





They estimate these improvements would cost a fraction of building entirely new lines or quad-tracking. To quad-track the Yamanote Line, for example, they estimate the need to acquire about 400,000 sq m of land (10 m ROW × 35 km loop, plus additional space at stations and yards), which would end up costing about ¥4 trillion assuming ¥10 million per sq m for land and relocation costs. With construction, this ends up being about ¥5 trillion. Going with a deep subway, the cost would be about ¥2 trillion assuming ¥50 billion per km.

Short-term solutions
They estimate several short-term solutions that can increase capacity to 150% or 300% of current levels, including allowing trains to depart simultaneously with door closure. They also propose scrapping the traditional stopping patterns of LTD EXP > EXP > LOCAL with fast trains passing local trains and instead switching to a skip-stop pattern. Assuming three train types (A, B, and C), each train would skip one in every three stations (e.g., A train would skip A stations). By allowing one in every three trains to skip “bottleneck” stations, they hope to squeeze additional capacity out of existing tracks and reduce travel times. While some passengers would be inconvenienced because their train would skip the main inner-city terminal, they believe these negatives would be outweighed by the ability to increase overall frequency on the line.

Funding
In terms of funding the proposed improvements, they propose charging an extra fee for a seat. This would function similar to JR East’s green car service where you tap your Suica card to the designated reader for the seat you want to use, but would effectively extend this type of system to the standard seating areas inside trains. Based on 40 million daily riders across the Tōkyō rail network and an average “seat” fee of ¥40 per passenger, they estimate they could raise about ¥600 billion annually to help fund improvements.

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Old September 20th, 2016, 02:33 PM   #790
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An article about Tanaka Tomoyuki (田中智之), the architect that made that awesome axonometric view of the Shinjuku Station complex:
https://www.wired.com/2016/07/lose-t...rain-stations/

Click below for larger views.

Shibuya
This view will look completely different with completion of all of the redevelopment projects and station upgrades.



Tōkyō
This one gives a good view of how far away the Keiyō Line platforms are from the rest of the JR platforms. Now, if only this showed the entire underground complex down to Hibiya and Higashi-Ginza and we could stick in a dotted box for the TX extension + new subway line through to Harumi and Toyosu, we’d be set.



And a different version of the Shinjuku one:

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Old September 20th, 2016, 02:57 PM   #791
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Nothing on technological improvements like CBTC?

A lot of the Japanese railways I see only hit up to 20 or so tph in the peak, which is plenty of wasted frequencies by the looks of it...

Shorter lines like the Toyoko Line or the Fukutoshin Line could convert to all-stop operation to reap the benefits of an enhanced signaling system. I think it's possible that some lines could see frequencies double...

As for double-decker trains, perhaps the more crowded lines could look at the RER A and its (almost) all-double decker fleet.

I can't see the proposed skip-stop working out without improved frequencies, or you could only get a train you can cram on once every 20 minutes...

On a side note, how does the Chiyoda Line skip the Mita Line's Otemachi Station? Is the Chiyoda Line at a lower level or something?
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Old September 20th, 2016, 05:45 PM   #792
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One thing that could be done which would cost little if at all would be raise the prices of season passes, to the level where companies (who subsidize employee commuting expenses) would be induced to introduce flex time for many if not all of their employees. The season passes which can only be used after 9:00 or 9:30 am would remain at current pricing levels or even discounted. Of course, this would be politically impossible, but it's probably the most efficient and economical method.
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Old September 20th, 2016, 10:46 PM   #793
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Yeah, accelerating the adoption of flexible work schedules is probably the easiest soft measure. Excessive peakyness is generally not a good thing for operations anyways. At least on the railway side, there seems to be more interest lately in putting in earlier trains, as ridership in the pre-peak hours has been growing.
http://toyokeizai.net/articles/-/133552
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Old September 20th, 2016, 10:46 PM   #794
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
An interesting article about some of the new governor’s ideas about improving the rail network. Definitely some out-of-the-box ideas, but probably leaning more towards pie-in-the-sky… I doubt any of these will go anywhere, and the money would probably be better spent on projects that the government and the railways have already identified. The only one that seems to be reasonable / feasible would be reducing the dwell times, which would actually help quite a bit, as there are more than a few lines where the bottlenecks are major stations with only two tracks where all the trains stop.
http://withnews.jp/article/f01609190...01qq000014036A

One of Governor Koike’s campaign promises was to eliminate overcrowded trains, and the article goes in-depth with the consulting firm that helped draft her transportation policy. Here are some of the key points:

Bi-level trains
One of the long-term ideas is to operate bi-level trains. This would be different than the existing bi-level rolling stock found in Japan (like JR East’s green cars) where there is a shared set of doors in the vestibules… Instead, these would be fully bi-level trains where each level can function independently and would be served by dedicated platforms.

They would achieve this by removing the pantograph and catenary and lowering the car floor for the bottom level by 30–40 cm. In order to allow for removal of the pantograph and catenary, propulsion systems and trains would be replaced with a linear motor-based system similar to the Toei Ōedo Line. In subways, the vertical clearance is limited, so they would make the upper level for seated passengers only (no standing). The lower platform levels would also end up being fairly cramped, with low ceiling heights.

The proposed bi-level trains would not be permitted on lines with smaller loading gauges like the Marunouchi Line, Ginza Line, and the various linear motor subways. The ability to run through-services would be limited, but they feel that most passengers would choose to reduce overcrowding if given the choice of reducing overcrowding or permitting / maintaining through-services.





They estimate these improvements would cost a fraction of building entirely new lines or quad-tracking. To quad-track the Yamanote Line, for example, they estimate the need to acquire about 400,000 sq m of land (10 m ROW × 35 km loop, plus additional space at stations and yards), which would end up costing about ¥4 trillion assuming ¥10 million per sq m for land and relocation costs. With construction, this ends up being about ¥5 trillion. Going with a deep subway, the cost would be about ¥2 trillion assuming ¥50 billion per km.

Short-term solutions
They estimate several short-term solutions that can increase capacity to 150% or 300% of current levels, including allowing trains to depart simultaneously with door closure. They also propose scrapping the traditional stopping patterns of LTD EXP > EXP > LOCAL with fast trains passing local trains and instead switching to a skip-stop pattern. Assuming three train types (A, B, and C), each train would skip one in every three stations (e.g., A train would skip A stations). By allowing one in every three trains to skip “bottleneck” stations, they hope to squeeze additional capacity out of existing tracks and reduce travel times. While some passengers would be inconvenienced because their train would skip the main inner-city terminal, they believe these negatives would be outweighed by the ability to increase overall frequency on the line.

Funding
In terms of funding the proposed improvements, they propose charging an extra fee for a seat. This would function similar to JR East’s green car service where you tap your Suica card to the designated reader for the seat you want to use, but would effectively extend this type of system to the standard seating areas inside trains. Based on 40 million daily riders across the Tōkyō rail network and an average “seat” fee of ¥40 per passenger, they estimate they could raise about ¥600 billion annually to help fund improvements.

This project is an utopia. Maintenance costs would be extremely high and the operation of the trains would have a feasible cost.

In Tokyo, buses are very underused. For example, Toei Bus has not any bendy buses (only 11-metre midibuses) and its lines are inefficient. Cities such as London, New York and São Paulo have free bus-subway transfer. Tokyo don't has it.

Some Tokyo avenues has enough space for BRT lanes like New York's Select Bus Service. For example, it is possible to implant a BRT service between Shinjuku and Asakusa via Ichigaya and Ueno with bendy buses every 5 minutes and free transfer with Toei Subway via Pasmo card. Tokyo Governemt could think in buses to improve the urban mobility.
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Old September 21st, 2016, 12:58 AM   #795
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There is interest in rebuilding at least part of the Tokyo tram system. Hopefully, it can alleviate things.
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Old September 21st, 2016, 07:10 AM   #796
quashlo
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Nothing on technological improvements like CBTC?
JR East will begin testing CBTC on the Jōban Local Line by 2020, because it’s a fully segregated line with really simple operations that is not all that different from the typical “metro” lines where CBTC is most frequently applied. They are already outfitting E233 series sets on the line with CBTC equipment.

However, most JR East lines are not like the Jōban Local Line, so JR East developed its own wireless train control system (ATACS), which will debut on the Saikyō Line in 2017 (installation is already underway). Eventually, they hope to expand ATACS to the entire network in Greater Tōkyō by 2036, although a final decision will likely come after the results of the CBTC trials on the Jōban Local Line. ATACS has the same types of functionality as CBTC, but includes some other capabilities such as control of grade crossings that are more peculiar to mainline railways.

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A lot of the Japanese railways I see only hit up to 20 or so tph in the peak, which is plenty of wasted frequencies by the looks of it...
It's not wasted per se... More like it’s “lost” because it’s generally not possible to run more than that on a two-track line with complex operations like passing and branching. Metro-type operations can do more (closer to ~30 tph limit), but only because they have a simplified "locals only" service pattern that is best for short-distance travel. When you start talking about the longer distances of mainline operations like JR or the major private railways, you need to have faster, limited-stop services to be able to attract passengers from further out.

The other issue is that when you get to major interchange stations (think Yokohama, JR Kawasaki, or the stations on the Yamanote Line), the interchange of passengers is a huge damper on minimizing the dwell time and trying to get it to be more predictable. You can frequently have a situation where half or more of the passengers will get off and another half or more will get on.

You could simplify the timetable and remove passing completely in an attempt to gain additional trains, but then you would end up significantly increasing travel times for passengers on longer journeys. A skip-stop proposal like the one mentioned in the article is one way around this and would allow for additional capacity while maintaining fast service.

Unlike the article, though, I don’t think major stations should be skipped at all, but as long as you have two platforms or more in each direction at these stations, you would be able to do what the Chūō Rapid Line does at Nakano and Shinjuku and alternate between each side of the platform (交互発着). This would also solve the issues with long and highly-variable dwells. Currently, this is how JR can get 29 tph on the line, even with some fast services that skip stops.



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Originally Posted by luacstjh98 View Post
As for double-decker trains, perhaps the more crowded lines could look at the RER A and its (almost) all-double decker fleet.
Actually, the RER A is different from what’s being proposed here and is closer to the existing JR East green cars… Basically, the upper and lower levels on these cars are not independent and have shared doors in the vestibules. They may have more seats, but green cars actually take away total capacity by reducing standing space, plus they have longer dwell times because there are fewer doors.

What’s being proposed here is fully bi-level, and each station would have two levels of platforms to serve each train. This is so far out there that it’s venturing into virgin territory—as far as I know, there’s no place that does this or has even given any serious thought to it.

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I can't see the proposed skip-stop working out without improved frequencies, or you could only get a train you can cram on once every 20 minutes...
The skip-stop pattern would basically allow the line to operate more like a modern metro, so it would be closer to 30 tph, assuming you have a second platform (or can find a way to reduce the dwell times) at the busier stations. So, assuming two stopping patterns, your average station would get 15 tph, or a train every 4 minutes.

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On a side note, how does the Chiyoda Line skip the Mita Line's Otemachi Station? Is the Chiyoda Line at a lower level or something?
No, they are on the same level, but the Chiyoda Line bows out to the east a bit to accommodate the Mita Line platforms. The road running above, Hibiya-dōri (日比谷通り), did not have enough ROW to accommodate both lines having stations side-by-side on this stretch. So the two lines alternate with stations on this stretch—from north to south, it goes Ōtemachi (Chiyoda Line), Ōtemachi (Mita Line), Nijūbashi-mae (Chiyoda Line), Hibiya (Mita Line), Hibiya (Chiyoda Line). The platforms on this stretch also end up curved somewhat for the same reason.
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Old September 21st, 2016, 10:22 AM   #797
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Articulated buses have been catching on in Japan over the past few years, and I think the trend will only accelerate. Starting in April of this year, even Shiga Prefecture has them now on the Ōmi Railway route serving Ritsumeikan University’s Biwako Campus:



And Nishitetsu Bus (Fukuoka), the largest bus operator in Japan, began testing them since last month:



Toei Bus doesn’t have any at the moment, so there aren’t any operating in central Tōkyō, but Keisei Bus operates them in Makuhari and Kanachū operates them in Fujisawa. There are more than a few Toei Bus routes with headways of ~5 minutes or less during the peak that would be really good candidates for articulated buses, like the 学 school routes and 都 trunk routes.
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Old September 21st, 2016, 12:43 PM   #798
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Tōkyō
This one gives a good view of how far away the Keiyō Line platforms are from the rest of the JR platforms. Now, if only this showed the entire underground complex down to Hibiya and Higashi-Ginza and we could stick in a dotted box for the TX extension + new subway line through to Harumi and Toyosu, we’d be set.
There definitely should be room on the Yaesu side, especially since any new line would most likely take advantage of the deep underground legislation. And TX's Akihabara station is located 30+ meters below ground anyway, so they don't have to go much deeper.

I would really like to see a new Tokyo station underneath Sotobori-dori on the Yaesu side with a two-platform four-track layout allowing cross-platform transfers between the TX extension and the direct Central Tokyo link of the Asakusa Line bypass, but it seems the Tokyo Metro Gov't aren't very keen on the latter at the moment because they apparently feel it would undermine the current Asakusa Line service.
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Old September 21st, 2016, 06:02 PM   #799
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What’s being proposed here is fully bi-level, and each station would have two levels of platforms to serve each train. This is so far out there that it’s venturing into virgin territory—as far as I know, there’s no place that does this or has even given any serious thought to it.
There were some proposals back in the 19th Century with the Boynton Bicycle System. And I don't know what the final configuration now is, but there were plans for alternating platform levels with one high and one low on each side for the Chunnel Terminals. Not sure whatever happened to that.
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Old September 21st, 2016, 06:25 PM   #800
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There definitely should be room on the Yaesu side, especially since any new line would most likely take advantage of the deep underground legislation. And TX's Akihabara station is located 30+ meters below ground anyway, so they don't have to go much deeper.

I would really like to see a new Tokyo station underneath Sotobori-dori on the Yaesu side with a two-platform four-track layout allowing cross-platform transfers between the TX extension and the direct Central Tokyo link of the Asakusa Line bypass, but it seems the Tokyo Metro Gov't aren't very keen on the latter at the moment because they apparently feel it would undermine the current Asakusa Line service.
But TX runs narrow gauge trains, right, so they can't run onto the Asakusa Line?

I personally think they could plug it into JR's planned link to Haneda Airport, perhaps with a spur to the Sobu Rapid to allow JR to operate through trains from Narita. And to alleviate concerns about duplicating the Asakusa Line, the line could be routed along Tokyo Bay, perhaps making fewer stops as a sort of express service to compete with Keikyu's airport expresses, while also providing better service to the Tokyo Bay area.
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