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Old May 22nd, 2008, 02:51 PM   #161
castermaild55
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Quote:
Yes but people also make interchanges and use more than one line for one trip, which other systems count as a single trip together
i considered that
for example , shinjuku is also included in chuo line and some subway.
so i made low number as an average.

that is why chuo line is 5 milions( shinhuku sta. is 3.5 milion)

the line between yokohama , saitama, chiba and kanagawa are not included

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Old May 23rd, 2008, 02:03 AM   #162
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These are still all just estimates, is there any official figure for total daily usage?
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Old May 23rd, 2008, 10:46 PM   #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweek View Post
Yes but people also make interchanges and use more than one line for one trip, which other systems count as a single trip together.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrizzyChris View Post
These are still all just estimates, is there any official figure for total daily usage?
There are official numbers of each operator. But simply summing these figures just makes an "inflated" number which we often see, as a single passenger will be counted multiple times when he transferred between different operators.

As the suburban+metro network is run by the dozens of different operators independently, we simply can't count transferring passenger as "one". I mean, I don't really know how you can do that here technologically.

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Originally Posted by napkcirtap View Post
can someone explain to me what a direct train service means?
does it mean that "a" line trains and "b"line trains use the same track and platforms(share the same route?), and "a" line trains continue beyond its terminal into suburbs to designated "b"stations, and vice versa?
Yes, it's something like that. I believe Tokyo Metro calls it "through service", but other operators may call it differently.
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Old May 24th, 2008, 05:28 AM   #164
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So do you think 40million is too high? Would a figure of between 20-30 million seems more accurate?
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Old June 14th, 2008, 10:36 AM   #165
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New subway line to open in Tokyo on June 14

TOKYO —
More than 80 years after Tokyo’s first subway line opened between Asakusa and Ueno, the city gets another subway line, as Tokyo Metro opens the Fukutoshin line on Saturday. First planned back in 1985, the Fukutoshin line will travel 8.9 kilometers from Ikebukuro to Shibuya, with six stations in between. However, the line will connect to the Tobu Tojo line via Wakoshi, and the Seibu Yurakucho and Ikebukuro lines via Kitake-mukaihara. Through service is planned with the Tokyu Toyoko line at Shibuya for 2012, completing a broad rail network linking southwestern Saitama with central Tokyo and Yokohama.

Being promoted under the dubious slogan of “Subways that harmonize with towns and are loved by people along the line,” the Fukutoshin (the name means subcenter) is the ninth subway line to be operated by Tokyo Metro Co Ltd, which carries 5.9 million passengers a day along 195.1 kilometers of track via 179 stations. By comparison, the city’s other subway system, the metropolitan government-run Toei network transports 2.03 million passengers daily and has 109 kilometers of track and 106 stations on its four lines.

The construction of the Fukutoshin line was decided back in 1985, said Tatsuya Edakubo, a spokesman for Tokyo Metro. “It was planned by the central government’s Council for Transportation Policy and construction began in 2001.” Up until recently, it was referred to as Line No. 13. “This time, we decided on the name of the line within the company by asking employees for suggestions. In prior cases, we sometimes carried out a public campaign to select the name,” said Edakubo.

Fukutoshin will be the last line that Tokyo Metro will open, he said, because the Council for Transportation Policy has held review meetings every five years for the past few decades and believes the city is now fairly well covered by subway lines. Toei, on the other hand, is planning to add to the Mita and Oedo lines by 2015.

For Tokyo Metro, the opening of the Fukutoshin line ends an 80-year journey. Tokyo’s first subway opened on Dec 30, 1927, between Asakusa and Ueno (now part of the Ginza line) by the government. The Teito Rapid Transit Authority was established in 1941 and since then, it has overseen the extension of the Ginza line, and the construction of seven other lines (Marunouchi, Hibiya, Tozai, Chiyoda, Yurakucho, Hanzomon and Namboku). In 2004, the authority was transformed into a special company called Tokyo Metro, its first step toward privatization.

Building a new subway line is not cheap when you consider how deep some stations are. The deepest station on the Fukutoshin line is Higashi-Shinjuku at 35 meters (Roppongi on the Oedo line is Tokyo’s deepest station at 42.3 meters). Construction can cost up to 247,000 million yen per kilometer. Most of the civil engineering costs (tunnels and infrastructure) on the Fukutoshin line are being subsidized by the national and Tokyo metropolitan government’s road-use revenue.

When a new line is planned, the first step is deciding where the stations will be. “The locations are part of the council’s plan, although each ward office has a say,” explained Edakubo. “The same applies to the name of the station.” Before construction can begin, the area is surveyed for historical relics. This is normal procedure in Japan at all building sites in accordance with the Law for the Protection of Cultural Properties. The area near Zoshigaya Station, for example, has turned up relics dating back hundreds of years, among them sake containers and ceramic pots and containers.

Six stations beneath Meiji-dori

Six of the stations along the Fukutoshin line lie beneath Meiji-dori, which will ease traffic congestion on that artery, and be particularly convenient if Tokyo is successful in its 2016 Olympic bid, since many events will be held in that area. From Shibuya, the line passes through Meiji-jingumae, Kita-sando, Shinjuku-sanchome, Higashi-shinjuku, Nishi-waseda and Zoshigaya before reaching Ikebukuro.

“Trains will run every three minutes, 35 seconds during rush hours, and every five minutes at other times,” said Edakubo. Rush hour congestion remains a big headache for commuters. “We can only estimate how many passengers will use the Fukutoshin line. Currently, our most congested line is the Tozai line. On the Fukutoshin line, trains will have ten cars and eight when it becomes the through service with the Toyoko line from Shibuya. That’s because some of the stations on the Toyoko line can only accommodate eight cars. With our other lines, all have ten cars, except for the Ginza line which has only six and the Hibiya line with eight because their platforms are shorter.”

As for women’s only cars, which are already operated on the Hibiya, Tozai, Chiyoda, Yurakucho and Hanzomon lines, Edakubo said, “Eventually we will have women’s only cars on the Fukutoshin line, but not right away. We don’t know which cars they will be yet because when we have through services, we have to accommodate other rail companies and their policy on the issue.”

The through service with other subway and rail companies is one of one of the most efficient features of Tokyo’s subway. The subways were initially planned to replace the streetcar network, and passengers traveling into the center of Tokyo from the suburbs had to change trains at terminal stations. To ease congestion, through-services were created, the first one being on the Hibiya line just prior to the Olympic Games in 1964. Commuting in the Kanto region became even more hassle-free last year with the introduction of PASMO, an IC card that can be used on most private rail companies, subways and buses.

With the decision not to build any more lines, Edakubo said Tokyo Metro will concentrate on improving its facilities and new businesses, such as real estate and IT. All stations on the Fukutoshin line will offer wireless LAN services, as well as barrier-free facilities and Braille vending machines. The platforms have half-height platform doors to prevent people accidentally falling off platforms due to overcrowding (and suicides). The ceilings on the Fukutoshin are much higher than at other stations. Shinjuku-sanchome has a mezzanine floor overlooking the platform. At Ikebukuro, Tokyo Metro plans to open another Echika-type complex similar to the one at Omotesando, said Edakubo.

For anyone interested in the details of how a subway is constructed, the Fukutoshin Line Construction Office has built an Exhibition Hall at Shinjuku-sanchome Station. Exhibits include a diorama of the Fukutoshin line, construction machinery models and explanations of how tunneling is done and what happens to all the soil and slurry dug up.

http://www.tokyometro.jp/fukutoshin/

fukutoshin line shibuya station














A pipe for cooling is buried.Glass fiber is kneaded into concrete.







It is an open ceiling though it is an underground.

Air flows to every corner by dome-shaped.

natural ventilation system













Last edited by japanese001; June 14th, 2008 at 10:59 AM.
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Old June 14th, 2008, 07:34 PM   #166
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The train is different... I like it!
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Old June 15th, 2008, 07:55 AM   #167
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The Station looks very open.

Looks different from other Tokyo metro lines,cool!
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Old June 15th, 2008, 09:55 PM   #168
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Interesting. Any maps that show where this will be?
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Old June 16th, 2008, 12:58 PM   #169
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Is it just me? Or does the train looks like the new rolling stock of the Beijing Subway Line 1
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Old June 16th, 2008, 02:20 PM   #170
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Originally Posted by anonymous_filipino View Post
Is it just me? Or does the train looks like the new rolling stock of the Beijing Subway Line 1
oo, tama ka it looks similar
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Old June 17th, 2008, 11:24 AM   #171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme View Post
Interesting. Any maps that show where this will be?
here - it's line F

http://www.tokyometro.jp/global/en/s...outemap_en.pdf
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Old June 17th, 2008, 12:54 PM   #172
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Its quite clean and simple. Interesting nevertheless.
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Old June 17th, 2008, 04:49 PM   #173
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Looks awesome, new trainsets for the new line?
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Old June 17th, 2008, 06:47 PM   #174
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Yes, the 10000 series cars are the Fukutoshin Line's official rolling stock; they also gave some existing Yuurakuchou Line rolling stock a new paint job and called it "Fukutoshin Line Rolling Stock," which I thought was a bit pathetic.

I rode the express service of this today and I must say I am disappointed; the Saikyou Line is better. Fukutoshin Line gave itself too many sharp turns to negotiate and results in slow service. The only 通過待ち (overtaking) station is Higashi-Shinjuku, and frankly, given the volumes it is expected to cope with later, is insufficient.

The line has been suffering delays due to crowding on its first two days' rush hours (both periods on Monday and at least the morning this morning (Tuesday), not sure on the evening period rush). It is not meeting performance expectations here.

Shibuya station is creating quite the buzz, and to some extent it should, it is designed by Tadao Ando, but it is only one station on the line; the other stations are not that impressive.

The line runs beyond Ikebukuro as well to Kotake-Mukaihara; this part of the line has been open for a few years already though and so is not considered "new" but is considered part of the Fukutoshin-sen (and is quad-tracked with the Yuurakuchou Line). The Yuurakuchou Line from Kotake-Mukaihara to Wakoushi is also listed as part of the Fukutoshin Line, but this is not a quad-tracked portion and is just an interlining service - no new infrastructure (unless signage counts).
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Old June 17th, 2008, 07:03 PM   #175
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Honestly it doesn't suprise me, when I was in Japan, I saw that newer line were less efficient than older one.

If we look the Oedo line, Namboku Line are not so good if you compare with the older lines.
It is also the case for Osaka with the Nagahori Tsurumi-ryokuchi Line and the Imazatosuji Line.
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Old June 17th, 2008, 10:24 PM   #176
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the new line looks awesome in tokyo its like wow and they have express service in it?

so is it like NYC subway or alot different?
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Old June 18th, 2008, 04:34 AM   #177
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
Honestly it doesn't suprise me, when I was in Japan, I saw that newer line were less efficient than older one.

If we look the Oedo line, Namboku Line are not so good if you compare with the older lines.
It is also the case for Osaka with the Nagahori Tsurumi-ryokuchi Line and the Imazatosuji Line.
One of the things that slow Namboku down is its platform doors, but it also has some sharp turns of its own, such as at Meguro.

I am no fan of the Oedo Line; it's CRAP. And like Oedo Line, Fukutoshin Line gets fairly deep at the Shibuya end (not surprising).

What you say is true in some cases, the older lines like Toei Shinjuku, Toei Asakusa lines are pretty good, but other older lines like the Hibiya Line are among the worst in the network.

Commuter lines, especially non-JR commuter lines, provide a better ride, though some lines, notably JR Lines, don't have the frequency of the subway. If commuter lines actually penetrated the Yamanote Line (and the built form had been worked around them for an efficient alignment), which none do without subway-through-service operations, the subway would get its ass kicked.
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Old June 30th, 2008, 03:53 AM   #178
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Originally Posted by Songoten2554 View Post
the new line looks awesome in tokyo its like wow and they have express service in it?

so is it like NYC subway or alot different?
From what I've seen of this new tokyo line, it seems VERY different from the NYC subway. Subways in NY are low and full of columns due to the bedrock and other rocks that lie beneath the city, which make it ideal for skyscrapers. This is why the subway stations are so much less spacious and airy than this new subway line. The NYC subway is in need of a gut renovation, as most of the stations were built in the early 1900's, and were not made to handle the electrical, plumbing, etc, that is needed today. This new Tokyo line will be made with the newest equipment and be very clean. Besides these differences and a few more, they both are metros that are very heavily used.
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Old June 30th, 2008, 08:32 PM   #179
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Wow, looks very bright and airy station! It looks really nice.
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Old July 19th, 2008, 03:42 AM   #180
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nice pics.....But I dont like some of the trains from outside
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