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Old February 22nd, 2015, 09:53 PM   #41
Jay
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So I take it this will be starting soon?
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 10:36 PM   #42
LCIII
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Seattle's city council discourages height...enormous fees, strict limits (even after the fees), etc.
But in this particular case they tried to convince the developer to build taller. Details of the conversation are outlined in the design review board meeting reports.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 10:37 PM   #43
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So I take it this will be starting soon?
It could. They're defibitely charging forward with permitting. They'll be in a position to go ahead when they want. They've said they won't start unless they have some space preleased but allegedly there has been interest. Fingers crossed.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 10:39 PM   #44
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But in this particular case they tried to convince the developer to build taller. Details of the conversation are outlined in the design review board meeting reports.
Man.. hopefully he changes his mind, they're not too far off Columbia Center.

But it's still great as is so whatever happens will be a nice addition
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Old March 26th, 2015, 06:10 PM   #45
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DEAL OF THE WEEK
J-Shaped Tower Looks to Lure Seattle Tech Firms
$600 million development also could lend spark to downtown’s core
By MAX TAVES
March 17, 2015 1:52 p.m. ET

Can Seattle developer Wright Runstad & Co. convince technology companies that a downtown skyscraper will make better office space than the hip lakefront neighborhood many of the firms now favor?

A lot is riding on the answer—about $600 million in development. In Seattle, as in many large cities, young, fast-growing technology companies often lease space in older, low-slung buildings in sometimes gritty parts of town, avoiding the tall towers built a generation ago and designed for very different tenants—namely, lawyers, bankers and accountants.

But Wright Runstad says the design of its planned building will impress the techies enough to convince them to move to city’s traditional financial district. The longtime Seattle developer’s plans for Rainier Square, unveiled last year and now awaiting final city approval, will span an entire city block and will feature a 58-story tower, a separate 12-story hotel as well as retail space. The first 40 floors of the tower are slated for 765,000 square feet of office space; 180 apartments will occupy the top 18 floors. If built as planned, the 849-foot tower will be Seattle’s second-tallest building.

What makes the building unusual is its shape, which resembles a ski jump, or even the letter “J,” with large bottom floors that narrow as the building rises. As a result, the building will have 27 different size floors. The wide base, with a 33,000 square-foot floor plate, would be significantly larger than most skyscrapers, whose floors are typically more than 25% smaller and rise uniformly from bottom to top.

The unorthodox form of Rainier Square’s planned tower is meant not only to help it stand out in a Seattle skyline better known for the iconic Space Needle, but to help Wright Runstad lure tech companies away from their comfort zones.

“Tech users have just expressed desire for larger floor plates, places where they can lay spaces very efficiently and ceilings that don’t make them feel claustrophobic,” says Greg Johnson, president of Wright Runstad.

Mindy Levine-Archer, an architect at NBBJ in charge of Rainier Square’s 1.15 million square foot design, says the tower’s large floor plates will allow for more interaction among employees, another factor tech companies appreciate. “The more people that are sharing the same contiguous space, the easier it is to build that critical culture,” she says.

The building’s highest office floors are significantly smaller compared with most skyscrapers. The developer and its architect say smaller floors of 13,600 square feet will appeal to younger, smaller companies, which can lease an entire floor rather than sharing it with other companies—something they couldn’t do in a typical building.

To create the large, unobstructed spaces that technology companies find appealing, Wright Runstad’s tower would, on many floors, place the elevators to one side rather than in the middle of the floor as in traditional towers.

The development is a $600 million bet on a part of Seattle that has trailed its local competitors for office tenants—and buzz.

The financial district is already home to satellite offices of companies such as Twitter Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.Zillow Group Inc. and digital food brand AllRecipes also have their headquarters in the area.

But so far, tech companies have overwhelmingly congregated in surrounding areas like Pioneer Square, Denny Triangle and, particularly, South Lake Union, a neighborhood north of downtown with the kind of eclecticism young tech workers like—think warehouses, urban lofts, parks, and bocce ball courts. Amazon is headquartered in this lakefront area about a mile north of downtown.

Getting technology firms to relocate or expand to offices downtown is beyond the control of one development project, no matter how big. Creative workers like “authentic urban environments—organically grown amenities that are not created just for them—a bar that’s been open for 50 years, authentic grit” says John Adams of global design firm Gensler. “They’re not just working in their offices. They’re working everywhere.”

Mr. Johnson of Wright Runstad says Rainier Square is within walking distance from Pike Place Market, one of the nation’s oldest and largest farmers’ markets, and will provide just that kind of lure. Architects at NBBJ say offering “distinctive and unique” retail is a central prong of their development plans.

To be sure, there is more at stake than just a new building. If Wright Runstad, whose development experience includes building the headquarters of Microsoft Corp. in Redmond, Wash., and the former headquarters of Amazon in south Seattle, can lure technology companies downtown, it could help jump-start the area’s revitalization.

“It’s the 50-yard line in downtown Seattle,” says Bruce Ganong of real estate-services firm HFF Inc., which is leading the developer’s efforts to raise about $250 million in equity for the project. “It’s a chance to redevelop the center of the city. It’s in the middle of where you want to be.”

Seattle’s downtown core lacks the kind of urban energy that some major American cities have, says John Lo, a managing director at brokerage JLL Inc. “The city has high-end shopping, but you don’t have a Union Square or a Times Square-type draw that a big city would typically have,” says Mr. Lo, who says he’s optimistic that Rainier Square could help provide that. “To be a vibrant 24-hour city, you not only need office and residential but also retail.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/j-shaped...rms-1426614763

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Old January 24th, 2016, 09:49 AM   #46
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12/04

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Originally Posted by Ruffhauser View Post
From todays DJC.

http://www.djc.com/news/re/12084211.html

December 4, 2015

Wright Runstad plans 2017 start for $600M Rainier Square project
By JOURNAL STAFF

Wright Runstad & Co. plans to start construction in early 2017 on the nearly $600 million redevelopment of Rainier Square, including a new 58-story tower.

The Seattle firm said in a press release that the Seattle Department of Planning and Development has approved the master use permit. If the decision is not appealed within 14 days, the permit will be issued.

Wright Runstad is developing the project for its own account on land owned by the University of Washington under an 80-year ground lease. After that period, the UW will own it.

The tower will contain more than 750,000 square feet of office space and about 200 apartments.

The project also includes 30,000 square feet of restaurants and retail shops, and a 155-room premium hotel, which will be in a separate 12-story building. There will also be underground parking for over 1,200 cars.

Wright Runstad said the first tenants will occupy the tower in late 2018.


“We are seeing strong office and retail tenant demand for Rainier Square,” said Company President Greg Johnson. “We have several active negotiations underway, including with a major hotel operator.”

The firm declined to name the operator.

NBBJ is designing the project, Lease Crutcher Lewis is the general contractor and Magnusson Klemencic Associates is the structural engineer.

Johnson said the design incorporates feedback from the design review board for a bolder, more dramatic curve on the tower's east face.

“The exciting visual interplay between the new tower and existing Rainier Tower makes Rainier Square a strong complement to one of the city's most iconic buildings,” he said.

The company said the project will contribute about $11.5 million for affordable housing, open space, and support for childcare and landmarks.

Wright Runstad said union representatives from the Iron Workers, Carpenters and Operating Engineers expressed support.

Rainier Square is part of the UW's Metropolitan Tract, which covers about 11 acres on more than four city blocks. This was the land where the university was located before moving to its present location in 1895.

The tract also includes Fairmont Olympic Hotel, 5th Avenue Theater and the IBM Building.

Downtown Seattle Association President and CEO Jon Scholes said streetscape improvements, new retail, restaurants and large-scale development will help transform the city's core.

“There's a lot of momentum here, and a number of these projects are contributing to affordable housing, providing even greater benefit to the community,” he said.

Wright Runstad & Co. develops and manages office buildings, primarily in the Pacific Northwest.


Rainier Square from the corner of Fourth and University. The 12-story hotel is in the foreground, and the office and residential tower is behind.



The tower will have more than 750,000 square feet of office space and about 200 apartments.

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Old February 4th, 2016, 04:19 PM   #47
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Rainier Square Tower to Start Construction in 2017

Quote:
Along fourth Avenue, the developer intends to construct a separate 12-storey, 155-room high-end hotel featuring the same reflective glass facade. No announcements have been made so far as to which hotel group will take up the space. 2,800 square metres of retail spaces will occupy the base of both buildings when the project is eventually complete in 2019. Following the recent Seattle Department of Planning and Development approval for the complex, Wright Runstad & Company announced that construction on the project will start in early 2017, with the first tenants moving in by late 2018.
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Old February 6th, 2016, 07:52 PM   #48
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That is a rapid timeline!
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Old February 8th, 2016, 01:15 AM   #49
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Where is this gonna fit in the skyline? Any wide renders?
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Old October 5th, 2017, 09:53 PM   #50
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It begins!

https://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/...kyscraper.html
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Old October 6th, 2017, 03:17 AM   #51
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I like staircase shape buildings
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