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Old May 31st, 2014, 06:09 PM   #21
Verso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
15°E signposted in Trebnje, Slovenia
Nearby:


http://oreh.pef.uni-lj.si/~markor/Ob...ncic/nace4.jpg


http://imgcdn.geocaching.com/cache/l...3b1f8e5890.jpg
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Old June 1st, 2014, 12:26 AM   #22
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Arctic circle Sweden
It is good to know that the positions of the arctic circles and the tropics are approximate only, because they move constantly.

Due to the perturbations, the tilt of the axis of the Earth changes. Currently, the change is about 47 arc seconds per century. Thus, the average positions of the arctic circles currently move towards the poles at a rate of about 15 meters per year. The tropics move towards the equator.

In addition, there is a phenomena called nutation. It causes the tilt angle to move back and forth about 9 arc seconds within the cycle on 18.6 years. Thus, the arctic circles and tropics move about 280 meters around the average position within 9.4 years, and then turn back.

The longitudes are ambiguous, too. Their position depends on the reference ellipsoid the coordinate system is based on. For example, the GPS longitude of the Airy transit circle at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich is not zero but about 5.3 seconds on the western hemisphere. The difference at the latitude of London is about 120 meters, increasing to 160+ meters at the Equator.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 01:26 AM   #23
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In France they have their own cross-country meridians, and they signpost them on all major routes. We've got the line running from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel, and the line that runs from the Atlantic Ocean to the line that runs from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel





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Old June 1st, 2014, 02:01 AM   #24
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In France they have their own cross-country meridians, and they signpost them on all major routes. We've got the line running from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel, and the line that runs from the Atlantic Ocean to the line that runs from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel
These are not meridians but watersheds (or continental divides in American English). They follow the natural orography and separate different river basins, that are tributaries of different seas.

The village of Camporosso in Valcanale, Italy, is crossed by the watershed (spartiacque in Italian) between the Adriatic sea (Fella-Tagliamento basin) and the Black Sea (Slizza-Gail-Drau-Danube basin).
In this village there is the "Hotel Spartiacque", exactly on the line.




We can include those lines in this thread too, they're interesting.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 06:46 AM   #25
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Right, except in American English a watershed is any boundary between the drainage areas of two different rivers (or you can call the drainage area itself a watershed - example, "the Chesapeake Bay watershed.") While the Continental Divide is the major one - between Atlantic and Pacific drainage. The Continental Divide is marked on many of the roads that cross it, and closer to me there are signs on I-95 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike showing where you enter and leave the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The Chesapeake signs are put up by the Chesapeake Bay Commission, which is some sort of effort of the states involved to clean up the bay and the streams that feed it.

Search "Chesapeake Bay Watershed sign" in Google Images and you get a few examples right at the top.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 03:51 PM   #26
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Equator Sign in Indonesia

One of the famous one is located in the West Sumatra

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Old June 1st, 2014, 05:42 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
While the Continental Divide is the major one - between Atlantic and Pacific drainage. The Continental Divide is marked on many of the roads that cross it.
The closest that Europe comes to a continental divide would be the watershed between Rhine and Danube, two rivers going completely opposite ways to the North Sea and the Black Sea (but eventually both seas will bring you to the Atlantic of course). Signs along German motorways crossing that watershed will therefore speak of 'Europäische Wasserscheide'. Further west, this continental divide will turn into a divide between the Western Mediterrenean and the Atlantic. With distances between those two much smaller, the continental divide feels much less important. By American standards, one could compare with a divide between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic proper. Nonetheless, the French like signposting these divides too. Seemingly even the watershed between the Seine (leading to the Atlantic via the English Channel) and the Loire (leading directly to the Atlantic) has become worth signposting.

In any event, crossing the divide into the 'Mediterrenean area' was always a rather joyful moment on our holiday travels South. The Langres area on the French A31, where you cross the divide when travelling from the Netherlands, always felt like entering the South in some way (as much as the area is still Northern France by many other standards). Travelling through Germany, the signs at least gave a feeling that you were well into Southern Germany, but I guess there was no real 'South' feeling until properly crossing the Brenner ...

Back to meridians and parallels, here is a picture that I took when crossing the Capricorn on the Stuart Highway in Australia.

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Old June 1st, 2014, 05:46 PM   #28
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The American continental divide is much more pronounced due to the presence of the Rocky Mountains stretching from Mexico into Alaska. The European water divide is less spectacular, just hills you find anywhere from central France into Germany.

Dutch people love the south. When someone is going on holidays to France, you don't just say "we're going to France", but "we're going to southern France". I suppose most people would put Lyon as the traditional divide between northern and southern France.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 05:46 PM   #29
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Interesting.

You'll note that we capitalize Continental Divide. (It just struck me now.)
"Wasserscheide"'s an obvious cognate; out of curiosity, what's the Dutch?

EDIT: Arrows for Pino. I'm sure yours is interesting, too, Chris; I just haven't read it yet. :-)
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Old June 1st, 2014, 05:50 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post

Dutch people love the south. When someone is going on holidays to France, you don't just say "we're going to France", but "we're going to southern France". I suppose most people would put Lyon as the traditional divide between northern and southern France.
I've actually read Nooteboom's "In Nederland." In the original. :-) Interesting map on the back, where you guys have basically annexed the northwest of the ex-Yugoslavia, with a little corridor connecting it to Limburg.

("Er was een tijd, die volgens sommigen nog steeds vortduurt, waar Nederland veel groter was dan nu." Or something like that.

Ahem. Sorry.)

EDIT: Here's that map! http://www.decontrabas.com/.a/6a00d8...a143a32970d-pi
Although you've annexed more of Central Europe than I remembered.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 07:45 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The American continental divide is much more pronounced due to the presence of the Rocky Mountains stretching from Mexico into Alaska. The European water divide is less spectacular, just hills you find anywhere from central France into Germany.
Until you reach the part where the Alps start to form the continental divide of course, i.e. the watershed between the Rhine basin and that of Italian rivers. But in those places, you'll never see signs mentioning the continental divide. The scenery around mountain passes speaks for itself.

Quote:
Dutch people love the south. When someone is going on holidays to France, you don't just say "we're going to France", but "we're going to southern France". I suppose most people would put Lyon as the traditional divide between northern and southern France.
From the Dutch perspective, mentioning South helps creating the feeling that one is travelling to an area with a completely different look and feel than The Netherlands. In Germany and England, both the North and the South are considered Northern Europe anyway. In places like Italy and Spain, you are in Southern Europe irrespective of whether you are in their North or South. France is probably the only country, where the imaginary border runs through the middle. Its whereabouts depends on your point of view and Lyon probably makes a good average. When looking at vegetation, the border is further south, the look of the houses already starts changing around Macon. For me personally, Dijon is a nice point. From there, wine appellations start appearing on the signs ...

@Penn's Woods: Dutch word is waterscheiding.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 08:13 PM   #32
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Lyon is considered to be both north and south...
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Old June 1st, 2014, 08:25 PM   #33
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One enters the Rhône Valley at Lyon, and foliage begins to change to mediterranean style. Marseille shows up on the signs.

On the other hand I can't quite put the north-south divide on A75. One could say Clermont-Ferrand, but the vegetation and scenery looks more central European. The Auvergne also doesn't have a mediterranean climate. Millau feels like southern France (at least to me), but there aren't many towns of significance between Clermont-Ferrand and Millau that could act as the divide. There are also several mountain passes of near equal altitude along A75, instead of just one.
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Old June 1st, 2014, 08:43 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post

EDIT: Here's that map! http://www.decontrabas.com/.a/6a00d8...a143a32970d-pi
Although you've annexed more of Central Europe than I remembered.
Quebec has this too, pretty much Quebec + small corridor along I-95 and most of Florida
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Old June 1st, 2014, 09:41 PM   #35
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Plus Wildwood, N.J., and Old Orchard Beach, Me.
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 01:38 AM   #36
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In Germany and England, both the North and the South are considered Northern Europe anyway.
Since when is (southern) Germany considered Northern Europe?
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 06:06 AM   #37
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it seems pretty reasonable, I mean a place like Muenchen doesn't seem very "southern Europe", not nearly enough sun, and the people work too much
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 11:59 AM   #38
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Since when is (southern) Germany considered Northern Europe?
Since, like, always
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 01:10 PM   #39
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Having said that, although I find Northern Germans generally friendlier, the way of life in the South is gemütlicher nevertheless.
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 02:52 PM   #40
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it seems pretty reasonable, I mean a place like Muenchen doesn't seem very "southern Europe", not nearly enough sun, and the people work too much
9C/48F for a high the one time I was in Munich. In fricking June.
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