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Old June 2nd, 2014, 03:23 PM   #41
Verso
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The hell? Germany is in Central- or Western-, not Northern Europe.
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 04:19 PM   #42
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In a socio-economic context, Germany is usually considered to be in northern Europe, usually when one divides Europe in just two entities; northern and southern.

The term Central Europe has yet to catch on outside that region. You'd be surprised at the amount of people in western Europe who still think in terms of the Eastern Bloc.
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 04:31 PM   #43
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Well... More Eastern Europe, which ranges from Estonia to Bulgaria.
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 05:28 PM   #44
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I'm 31 and this is the first time I hear of Germany being in Northern Europe. It will always be Central- or Western Europe to me. SSC is also the place where I first heard of the British Isles being in Northern Europe. I've always considered them Western Europe, that's what we were taught at school. Slovenia can be anything except Northern Europe.

Last edited by Verso; June 3rd, 2014 at 02:18 AM. Reason: everything -> anything
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 12:31 AM   #45
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The perceived divide is basically between the historical Latin world and the historical Germanic world. Latin equals South equals garlic equals roman catholic equals dodgy politics etc. Germanic equals North equals mostly protestant and basically equates home, with differences that are perceived easy to overcome. Even when in places as far South and catholic as Munich. If there is an East (many of the people making these generalisations won't care), it usually equals historically Slavic equals Orthodox equals former commies.

The fact that parts of Europe do not fit into these stereotypes is yet to occur to a number of people large enough to affect this perceived North-South-East divide. If anything, it has resulted in the perceived division of France in one part North and one part South. And this of course leaves the idea that slightly different stereotyping will easily lead to an East-West divide, possibly with Central sitting in between. In any event, I hope I have not offended anybody by mentioning the stereotypes.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 12:58 AM   #46
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Yes, I get it now, but we rarely use this division here. I only remember it from talks about the current economic recession where Southern Europe is doing much worse than countries north of the Alps.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 08:57 AM   #47
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That's where the sentiment became very prominent. But in discussions among 'Northeners' about holiday destinations, the distinction has been around for decades.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 09:50 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
In a socio-economic context, Germany is usually considered to be in northern Europe
Countries like Austria and Switzerland are socio-economically similar to Germany, but they are the essence of central europe.

The perception of what is to be considered central europe depends on your own location.

For someone in Sweden, Germany is definately central europe, the Baltic Sea is a natural divider between continental europe and Scandinavia which is northern europe although we rather would define us as scandinavians instead of northern europeans.

Hamburg, Germany is probably a northern european outpost for an italian tourist, but a central european city for a visiting swede.

Overall "Europe" and "european" is a vague term mostly used by non europeans.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 12:30 PM   #49
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Not on roads, but on a building in Turin:




I suppose this "Cassini meridian" (current 7°40' E) is of historical importance, at least in Italy, but can't find many info online. There are similar markings in other towns in Piemonte, Liguria and Val d'Aosta

Saint-Vincent (Val d'Aosta):


Perinaldo (Liguria), birthplace of the astronomer Gian Domenico Cassini:

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Old June 3rd, 2014, 02:36 PM   #50
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45th parallel north goes through Vojvodina region in Serbia (there's even a town which lies on that parallel) and unfortunately there isn't any marking...
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 03:34 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
I suppose this "Cassini meridian" (current 7°40' E) is of historical importance, at least in Italy, but can't find many info online. There are similar markings in other towns in Piemonte, Liguria and Val d'Aosta
I have already heard of it but I didn't know why it's important. Maybe just because it passes through the village where that astronomer was born.

Another meridian of historical importance in Italy is the "Meridian of Rome Monte Mario" (12° 27′ 08,400″E), that was used in Italy from the late XIX century to the middle XX century to calculate longitudes of places, instead of Greenwitch.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 04:36 PM   #52
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Seems to be a meridian running through the village where the astronomer was born indeed. Nice form of publicity for that village though ...

Like the Rome meridian, there are of course other historical prime meridians. The Paris meridian, which competed with Greenwich in the 19th century for international primacy, is visible in many places in Paris. On top of that, you have the Méridienne Verte project that renders the Paris meridian visible throughout France. A vague reminder of the former grandness of France, brought to you with the adjective 'green'. Anyway, you will find the Paris meridian signposted on many roads crossing it.

In the Netherlands, we had the historical meridian of Amsterdam which features on many maps until WW2. Never seen that highlighted on signs or otherwise though.
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Last edited by -Pino-; June 3rd, 2014 at 04:42 PM.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 04:38 PM   #53
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Interessting , always wondered , especially in Asian countries , lines can be very angular.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 04:56 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
Seems to be a meridian running through the village where the astronomer was born indeed. Nice form of publicity for that village though ...

Like the Rome meridian, there are of course other historical prime meridians. The Paris meridian, which competed with Greenwich in the 19th century for international primacy, is visible in many places in Paris. On top of that, you have the Méridienne Verte project that renders the Paris meridian visible throughout France. A vague reminder of the former grandness of France, brought to you with the adjective 'green'. Anyway, you will find the Paris meridian signposted on many roads crossing it.

In the Netherlands, we had the historical meridian of Amsterdam which features on many maps until WW2. Never seen that highlighted on signs or otherwise though.
The meridian of Philadelphia was used for a bit in the U.S.
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AL CA CT DE DC FL GA ID IL IN KY ME MD MA MI MN MO MT NH NJ NY NC ND OH OR PA RI SC SD TN UT VT VA WA WV WI WY ---
AB BC MB NB NS ON PE QC SK ---
A B CH D F GB I L NL
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Old June 4th, 2014, 01:42 PM   #55
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45th parallel at Cromwell, New Zealand




Not sure where this one is..... I think just south of Oamaru on State Highway 1

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Old June 4th, 2014, 04:16 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
Like the Rome meridian, there are of course other historical prime meridians. The Paris meridian, which competed with Greenwich in the 19th century for international primacy, is visible in many places in Paris. On top of that, you have the Méridienne Verte project that renders the Paris meridian visible throughout France. A vague reminder of the former grandness of France, brought to you with the adjective 'green'. Anyway, you will find the Paris meridian signposted on many roads crossing it.

In the Netherlands, we had the historical meridian of Amsterdam which features on many maps until WW2. Never seen that highlighted on signs or otherwise though.
The meridian of Paris was used indirectly as the prime meridian for centuries outside the British Empire: Ptolemy of Egypt proposed at the 2nd century that there should be a prime meridian at the westernmost position of the known world. That would give positive longitudes only. The longitude of the El Hierro (Ferro) island of the Canary Island was taken as the prime meridian in the 17th century, and it was declared to be 20 degrees to the west of Paris. Later, the longitudal distance was found somewhat inaccurate, but the declaration remained. Thus, for example a longitude of 15 degrees was in fact 5 degrees to the west of Paris.

My home library contains a Finnish math book from about 1915. It contains a number of exercises based on the Ferro meridian, and has no references to the Greenwich meridian. Thus, the agreement on making the Greenwich Meridian as the prime one made in 1884 was not deployed very quickly.

Finland had their own prime meridian, too. The zero longitude was located at the observatory of Helsinki. Finland decided in 1922 to base the new cartography on the Hayford ellipsoid and the Greenwich meridian. However, a few sheets of the lakeside marine charts still show the longitudes east/west from Helsinki. Those charts are still valid and being kept up-to-date.
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Old June 4th, 2014, 04:49 PM   #57
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Any road sign for the Antarctic Circle?
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Old June 4th, 2014, 04:53 PM   #58
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Um....

Shouldn't the Equator and the South Pole be equidistant?
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Old June 4th, 2014, 04:56 PM   #59
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Nope

It is the line that marks the theoretical halfway point between the equator and the South Pole. (The true halfway point is 16.2 kilometres (10.1 mi) south of this parallel because the Earth is not a perfect sphere but bulges at the equator and is flattened at the poles.)
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Old June 4th, 2014, 05:33 PM   #60
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Nope

It is the line that marks the theoretical halfway point between the equator and the South Pole. (The true halfway point is 16.2 kilometres (10.1 mi) south of this parallel because the Earth is not a perfect sphere but bulges at the equator and is flattened at the poles.)
Fine, but...

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Originally Posted by italystf View Post
....I start with my county, Italy. Northern Italy is crossed by the 45N parallel who marks the halfway distance between the Equator and the North Pole (5,000km from both). Due its particularity, it's signposted in many places.

Chieri, near Turin

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