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Old March 4th, 2008, 09:18 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sens2007 View Post
Hopefully, they go ahead with Alternative 4: LRT Tunnel (East & West Downtown LRT and North-South LRT). They could also expand that plan on the rest of the Transitway as demand and population will increase. Whatever the alternative chosen, the tunnel sounds good!
Hopefully yes.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 05:54 AM   #22
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The four options are up on the City of Ottawa's website, I'll post them here.

Option 1: Bus Tunnel

Description

* Twin bus-only tunnels through the Downtown
* Transitway remains bus-based with extensions:
o West Transitway - to Kanata West & North
o East Transitway - to Trim Road
o Cumberland Transitway - to Millennium Station
o Southeast Transitway - to Riverside South and Barrhaven
o Southwest Transitway - to Cambrian Road
* Existing diesel-powered O-Train service from Bayview to Greenboro remains
* Service requires high-capacity diesel-electric hybrid buses every 14 seconds through Downtown by 2031

Pros

* Lowest capital cost alternative
* Fewer transfers required than other alternatives

Cons

* Highest annual operating cost alternative
* No capacity for future growth through Downtown
* Higher level of system-wide emissions than all other alternatives
* No remaining capacity for STO customers in tunnel



Est. Costs:

Vehicles: $1.4 billion
Infrastructure: $1.76 billion
Total Capital Investment: $3.16 billion

Annual operating budget: $485 million

Last edited by canadave87; March 5th, 2008 at 11:11 PM.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 06:00 AM   #23
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Option 2: Joint-use BRT\LRT tunnel with North\South LRT

Description

* Twin joint-use LRT/bus tunnels through the Downtown
* Transitway remains bus-based with extensions:
o West Transitway - to Kanata West & North
o East Transitway - to Trim Road
o Cumberland Transitway - to Millennium Station
o South - Bowesville Station to Barrhaven Town Centre
o Southwest Transitway - to Cambrian Road
* O-Train converted to twin-track electric LRT, with extensions:
o Downtown (Bayview) to University of Ottawa
o Greenboro to Bowesville Station
o Airport
* Separate boarding areas for buses and LRT
* Operations through Downtown require by 2031:
o 2-car LRT train every 6 minutes
o High-capacity diesel-electric hybrid buses every 16 seconds

Pros

* Direct LRT connection to Downtown from the Airport
* Provides long-term growth capacity for LRT operations through Downtown tunnel

Cons

* Highest capital cost alternative
* Second highest annual operating cost alternative
* Severe imbalances between rail (every 6 minutes) and bus operations (every 16 seconds)
* No capacity for future growth of bus operations through Downtown
* Higher level of system-wide emissions compared to electric-only technologies
* No capacity for STO customers in tunnel



Est. Costs:

Vehicles: $1.4 billion
Infrastructure: $2.47 billion
Total Capital Investment: $3.87 billion

Annual Operating Budget: $472 million

Last edited by canadave87; March 5th, 2008 at 06:08 AM.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 06:07 AM   #24
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Option 3: LRT tunnel with East\West LRT

Description

* LRT-only tunnel through the Downtown
* Transitway converted to twin-track electric LRT from Baseline Station to Blair Station
* Existing diesel-powered O-Train service from Bayview to Greenboro
* Requires 4-car LRT train every 2 minutes through Downtown by 2031
* Remainder of network bus-based with extensions:
o West Transitway - to Kanata West and North
o East Transitway - to Trim Road
o Cumberland Transitway - to Millennium Station
o Southeast Transitway- Greenboro Station to Barrhaven Town Centre
o Southwest Transitway - to Cambrian Road
* Bus to rail transfers mainly occur at Baseline, Lincoln Fields, Hurdman and Blair Stations

Pros

* Second lowest capital cost alternative
* Second lowest annual operating cost alternative
* Connects major urban nodes with high-quality and high-capacity rapid transit service
* Can accommodate STO customers with additional investment
* Provides reliable and consistent service for all transit operations through Downtown
* Simplified passenger boarding operations in Downtown
* Provides long-term growth capacity
* Lower system-wide emissions than BRT Tunnel based alternatives

Cons

* Long-distance travelers from East, West and South must transfer to complete journey to downtown
* Major impact to existing Transitway service during conversion



Est. Costs:

Vehicles: $1.36 billion
Infrastructure: $2.01 billion
Total Capital Investment: $3.37 billion

Annual Operating Budget: $453 million
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Old March 5th, 2008, 06:15 AM   #25
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Option 4: LRT tunnel with East\West and North\South LRT

Description

* LRT-only tunnel through the Downtown
* Transitway converted to twin-track electric LRT from Baseline Station to Blair Station
* O-Train converted to twin-track electric LRT, with extensions:
o Greenboro to Bowesville Station
o Airport
* Requires 4-car LRT train every 2 minutes through Downtown by 2031
* Remainder of network bus-based with extensions:
o West Transitway - to Kanata West & North
o East Transitway - to Trim Road
o Cumberland Transitway - to Millennium Station
o South - Bowesville Station to Barrhaven Town Centre
o Southwest Transitway - to Cambrian Road
* Bus to rail transfers mainly occur at Baseline, Lincoln Fields, Bowesville, Hurdman and Blair Stations

Pros

* Lowest annual operating cost alternative
* Connects major urban nodes with high-quality and high-capacity rapid transit service
* Can accommodate STO customers with additional investment
* Direct LRT connection to Downtown from the Airport
* Simplified passenger boarding in Downtown
* Provides long-term growth capacity
* Can use EA approved Maintenance Yard facility
* Lowest amount of system-wide emissions compared to other alternatives

Cons

* Second-highest capital cost alternative
* Long distance travelers from East and West must transfer to complete journey to downtown
* Major impact to existing Transitway service during conversion



Vehicles: $1.38 billion
Infrastructure: $2.44 billion
Total Capital Investment: $3.82 billion

Annual Operating Budget: $432 million
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Old March 7th, 2008, 12:38 AM   #26
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So how is the O-train extension to downtown coming along? Haven't heard anything in a while.
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Old March 7th, 2008, 04:32 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayayess1190 View Post
So how is the O-train extension to downtown coming along? Haven't heard anything in a while.
looks like some of the proposals are leaning towards converting the entire thing into a tramway. Which would render the O-trains another major waste of money due to short sighted planning.
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Old March 7th, 2008, 06:16 AM   #28
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The O-Train extension was canceled when Larry O'Brien was elected Mayor in 2006.

And UD2, the O-Train will be kept in all of these plans, just the tracks doubled and extended to the airport and Bowesville, and existing stations lengthened to 90 to 120 metres. These proposals aren't for trams, either, we're talking an entirely grade separated rail system in alternatives 3 and 4.
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Old March 21st, 2008, 05:29 PM   #29
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Option 3 looks like the way to go for the moment, and conversion of the O train to permit option 4 looks like a phase 2 development. The City of Ottawa may want to give Gatineau a time limit to plug into the rail system (extending O train/or O train line converted to larger light rail), say 10 years, after which their buses may be severely restricted in routes across the Ottawa side.

I don't see why rail routes cannot be extended to Kanata and Orleans as future development phases.
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Old March 26th, 2008, 08:02 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrify View Post
This is fantastic news.
Yeah, although, mind you, news doesn't allude to any progress around our country



Quote:
Originally Posted by canadave87 View Post
The four options are up on the City of Ottawa's
I wouldn't hold my breath were I you -- it's only Earth's Ottawa that's supposèdly being given "options", coz it shows with excelled clarity just how dinky a country it (ahem) capitals....

Ottawa`s stepping backwards while showing no sign of reverting forward . . . it`s more muddled up than this sentence is! Plus, newswires have it that Ottawa`s awash in major municipal corruption, which seems to prove that none of the four options is gonna see the light of day any time soon. And, uhm, didn`t that dinky capital just steal/swipe/usurp a mighty fraction of its multi-million-dollar transport fund/budget for an overpass to some new suburban (ahem) boulevard there?!?

Last edited by trainrover; March 26th, 2008 at 08:11 PM.
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Old March 26th, 2008, 09:44 PM   #31
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Ottawa does have some problems when it comes to the municipal government, yes, but... how are any of these plans a step backwards? Even the first plan would mark an improvement to transit...
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Old March 27th, 2008, 01:15 AM   #32
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I dont know much about the situation in Ottawa, but I would prefer either option 3 or 4, depending on how much sense the O-train makes and how easy it is to transform it into a light rail system.

I see they project 400 mio dollar more for option 4. Considering that those additional costs pays off over the next 20 years if the numbers are correct, while there is no doubt that it grants the more capable solution, maybe option 4 is really the way to go.
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Old March 27th, 2008, 05:57 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
I dont know much about the situation in Ottawa, but I would prefer either option 3 or 4, depending on how much sense the O-train makes and how easy it is to transform it into a light rail system.

I see they project 400 mio dollar more for option 4. Considering that those additional costs pays off over the next 20 years if the numbers are correct, while there is no doubt that it grants the more capable solution, maybe option 4 is really the way to go.
Option 4 makes the most sense to me, as well. It coverts what is currently the busiest transit corridor in the city (Lincoln Fields to Blair) into rail, and creates a rail corridor to the airport and Bowesville, which as you can see from this view, is poised to become a major growth area within the next 10-15 years. I believe that Barrhaven, on the opposite bank of the Rideau River, is currently the fastest growing suburb in the Ottawa CMA.
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 06:20 AM   #34
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I can't actually find an article on the results, but it seems all-but-certain that Ottawa is going ahead with Option 4!

Quote:
Transit Pick On Track

City council expected to choose Option 4 with downtown tunnel for light-rail line

By DEREK PUDDICOMBE, CITY HALL BUREAU

Once again, the city is about to begin the long and arduous debate on the fastest, most affordable and convenient way to shuttle people around the nation's capital.

Eighteen months ago, there was a $1-billion light-rail plan in place that would have taken passengers from Barrhaven to the University of Ottawa, but city council decided that wasn't the route to take and cancelled the project.

It's now looking at a massive $4-billion, 25-year transit project that includes light rail from Baysview to just short of the Riverside South community, a tunnel under the downtown core and converting the bus transitway from Baseline to Blair Rd. to light rail. The annual operating cost of the plan by 2031 is estimated at $434 million.

What the city builds first won't be determined until later this fall, a debate councillors are saying could be one of the most contentious in recent years.

City staff and a joint meeting of the transit and transportation committees will lead off the debate today when they are expected to adopt the latest transit plan.


Two years ago, Mayor Larry O'Brien campaigned on fixing what he perceived to be problems with the former transit plan. He said he expects the latest plan to move people around more quickly.

"They (commuters) will use mass transit if it's fast," he said.

The most substantial part of the latest plan is the big dig under the downtown core that would accommodate twin light rail tunnels from LeBreton Flats to the Hurdman transit station. The idea of a tunnel came about after much concern about the last plan which allowed LRT to mix with buses and other traffic along Albert and Slater streets.

A staff report says a transit tunnel could lead to partnerships with the private sector "to create a vibrant community with services connected to active transit stations below ground."

One east-end councillor said he wants to see a citywide rail system, but moving forward with any plan and what to build first will depend on how much money the federal and provincial governments are willing to chip in.

Cumberland Coun. Rob Jellett said light rail shouldn't stop at Baseline and Blair Rd.

"We should have a plan to show rail everywhere," said Jellett. "We have to bring rail to Orleans. We need rail into Kanata and the Scotiabank Place and we need to take rail to the south."

Today's debate is also expected to include a report on what city staff thinks about several individual transit plans that some councillors have released in recent weeks.

Source
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 06:25 AM   #35
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And a couple of articles from the Citizen...

Quote:
Light rail will 'destroy' Parkway

Neighbours slam idea to run railway adjacent to Ottawa River

Thulasi Srikanthan, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Wednesday, May 21, 2008

City planners' preferred option to see a light railway line along the Ottawa River Parkway came under fire last night at a packed town hall meeting at the Hintonburg Community Centre.

"It will destroy the recreational use of the parkway," Robin Goodrich said to bursts of applause from the more than 90 residents who gathered at the centre.

Ms. Goodrich, who has lived in the area for 15 years, said the city should consider using Highway 417 or going underground with the rail line. She said she was concerned about the impact of such an initiative on the "incredible" area, which contains many wetlands.

The town hall meeting, which included representatives from all levels of government, touched on a variety of topics from green space to infrastructure to transit. Residents voiced concerns about everything from the National Capital Commission to problems with signage, to car culture, to effective fuels for buses. It served as a last chance for Ottawa residents to voice their concerns before councillors meet today to hash out city planners' transit option.

Option 4 would build a tunnel downtown and extend light rail south to Riverside South, east to Blair Road and West to Baseline Road.

An east-west light-rail line would also run from Blair Station on the current transitway through a downtown subway, west on a bus transitway to the end of Scott Street.

It would then run along the parkway to Lincoln Fields and beyond to Baseline on a transitway.

Ottawa resident Don Francis did not mince words when talking about the possibility of light rail on the Ottawa River Parkway.

"I think it's a stupid idea," he said. But he said he could live with the proposal if residents were given more information about how much the initiative would cost, what type of visual impact it will have and how it will affect access to the park.

He said he is not as likely to support a rail system completely above ground.

"No way," he said, adding he is more open to a system in which the train would be at least partially underground.

Kitchissippi Ward Councillor Christine Leadman argued the possibility of tracks along the Ottawa River Parkway is a big concern for her constituents.

"This is a larger community issue other than just an overall transit (one)," she said. "This particular item would have to come back and have much more community input."

Ms. Leadman said she will be raising the issue at the council meeting today.

"Right now, I don't believe there has been sufficient input," she said. "I think it's a very macro look at what our transit could look at, but when it comes down to it, we have to start looking at the individual pieces and how it is going to be phased in."

Ms. Leadman recently released her own plan, which proposes extending rail east-west, where the population and the demand is.

A key part of Ms. Leadman's plan is the elimination of the north-south rail, replacing it with an extension of the O-Train to Leitrim, which would save at least $600 million.

Ms. Leadman said there just aren't enough riders in the south end of the city to support light rail to Riverside South. She would also use existing rail lines to complement the new transit system.

Ottawa Centre NDP MP Paul Dewar also questioned the use of rail on the parkway, noting that the Queensway had been designed to be converted for light rail.

"Why in heaven's name did we get off the tracks?"

Ottawa resident Shirley Rayes advocated the use of more light rail instead of buses.

"The city has to go rail and go underground where necessary."

Source
Quote:
Transit will determine if we're a city or suburbs

Council and staff have done a poor job of selling the idea of a dense, vibrant, transit-dependent core that all 'real' cities have, writes Randall Denley.

Randall Denley
The Ottawa Citizen

Sunday, May 18, 2008

Ottawa city councillors' big decision next week on the future of transit is really more about planning than it is about transit. Or at least, it should be. The transit plan councillors recommend will determine what our city will be like in the future. Will it be a dense, urban city where people can live without cars, or is the goal to use commuter trains to enable even more suburban expansion?

City staff have it right when they recommend stopping light rail inside the Greenbelt. Higher-order transit like light rail is expensive and it only really makes sense where there is enough population density to justify frequent service. The decision to build rail in the core of the city must be accompanied by a much more effective intensification plan.

The alternative is the commuter train model, which would encourage people to live in the suburbs, but at great public expense. The inside-the-Greenbelt expansion and the extension of suburban transitways alone will cost $4 billion. Councillors who argue for rail to go all the way to their suburban wards are taking a stand guaranteed to please their constituents, but it would be poor planning. There just aren't enough people in the suburbs to justify the cost of bringing rail through the Greenbelt to reach them.

If Ottawa is to become a city, and not just a series of suburbs, making the right choice about transit is critical. It's unfortunate that the idea of a dense, vibrant, transit-dependent core has been so poorly sold by staff and politicians at City Hall. The staff report on the issue is a dry engineering document devoid of the excitement this city-changing plan should create. Councillors have been mostly preoccupied with working out some scheme to bring rail to their wards.

The question that underlies the debate between the commuter train version of the future and the transit city vision is, are we ready to be a real city? Real cities have a lot of people living in a relatively compact area, but this idea has always been controversial here. People inside the Greenbelt typically support intensification in principle, just not in their neighbourhood.

Look at a population density map of the city, and you will see that much of the area inside the Greenbelt is about the same density as the newer suburbs. The post-war suburbs that ring the city core are typified by smallish houses on biggish lots. Even the sort of townhouse development that is so typical in the suburbs now is considered inappropriate.

People love the status quo, and don't want their neighbourhoods to change. In Alta Vista, a developer has proposed to add two four-storey buildings and an 18-storey apartment building to two similar buildings that have long stood at Kilborn Avenue and Playfair Drive. The community is in an uproar over this modest plan.

Even a simple road map shows that there are significant areas in what should be the urban part of our city, where land has been used as if it were in endless supply. Check out the light industrial wasteland between Cyrville and Walkley roads. There is a vast amount of space around the National Defence Medical Centre. CFB Rockcliffe is a major site that will eventually be developed. Right beside the Citizen building, there is a huge, underutilized parking lot that could be developed for housing. There are areas like it around the city.

There is certainly room to put more people inside the Greenbelt. What's lacking is public awareness of the idea's virtues and skilful explanation of how it all could work. Both of those jobs fall to councillors and their staff, and the provincial government has given the city an important new tool to make it happen. In the city's old official plan, which will be revised later this year, population estimates for the area inside the Greenbelt were really just guesstimates of what might occur. The city now has the power to set a target for intensification in the centre, and it can prohibit the expansion of the urban boundary until that target is reached. Transit that really lets us reduce car use is critical to that intensification. It won't work if the added people just jam the streets with cars.

The transit system we have now reflected its time. The big new thing then was the development of satellite cities connected to the core by a bus transitway. It was a plan to make suburbs a feasible place for downtown workers to live, and it did its job. Unfortunately, this suburban-driven plan never worried too much about all those buses converging on the downtown core. Now, we're focused on making the central part of our city more liveable. The rail and tunnel plan is a big step in that direction.

Next Wednesday, councillors need to think about what the city can become over the next 25 years, and vote accordingly.

Source
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Old May 23rd, 2008, 01:37 AM   #36
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APPROVED! Transit plan passes first hurdle

Quote:
Committee OKs $4B mass-transit plan
Downtown tunnel option wins vote 9-1 in first step to 'getting transit right'

Jake Rupert
The Ottawa Citizen

Thursday, May 22, 2008

The municipality's preferred $4-billion mass-transit system passed its first major hurdle last night when it was endorsed by the city's transportation committee on a vote of nine to one.

It will now go to a full city council vote next week, where it is expected to pass by a healthy margin. In the fall, council is scheduled to decide in what order to build the system, and final approval of the entire transit system and strategy is slated for next spring.

The transit network is being developed along with updated land-use rules. These are being designed to support each other and encourage residential and employment density along transit routes. This is the city's second stab at creating a rapid-transit system in the last few years after the first plan was nixed by council at the last minute.

"This is our chance to move forward with a plan that makes sense and is achievable," said Innes Councillor Rainer Bloess.

If approved and built, the new system would see light rail from Blair Road downtown on the current bus transitway, through a subway across downtown and west to Baseline Road on the western transitway. Another light-rail line would run from LeBreton Flats to Bowesville Road. Bus transitways would connect Orléans, Kanata and Barrhaven to the light-rail system.

Under the current approach, the system and some improved inner-city transit routes would be the main public transportation network until 2031, and the suburban busways would be converted to light-rail after that. However, the entire system could be converted to light rail sooner, depending on the demand and funding.

"Approving this sends a message to the community that we are moving forward -- slowly but surely moving towards a citywide system," said Bay Councillor Alex Cullen.

Mayor Larry O'Brien led the charge to kill the last plan and is pleased with the new direction.

"This is the first and an important step toward getting transit right for the City of Ottawa," he said. "It gives us the option for more transit sooner, and I think this is good news. I, for one, am very comfortable with what happened here today."

The lone dissenting vote came from Capital Councillor Clive Doucet. Mr. Doucet didn't have a problem with the overall transit vision for the future, but he feels the city should be looking at other, cheaper options in case it can't get the plan funded and built.

He said he's worried the provincial and federal governments, which will be relied upon to fund at least two-thirds of the plan, won't see enough new ridership in the proposed system and will withhold funding. He feels the city should not be pursuing the larger system without having a Plan B as a fallback.

The vote came after a day of presentations from municipal planning and transit staff, led by deputy city manager Nancy Schepers, a panel of international experts who support the city's direction, and members of the public.

Ms. Schepers urged elected leaders to support the plan because it will be cost-effective in the long-run, faster, will increase ridership, and can be expanded if demand outstrips expectations. She said the system is supported by 75 per cent of the roughly 825 people who made written submissions during a recent round of public consultations. However, she also said "many, many" people feel the city needs to extend the system further into the suburbs now.

The international experts are against this idea because they feel it would encourage more urban sprawl and there isn't enough demand yet. They say stopping the system inside the greenbelt, as currently planned, will help focus land-use decisions around the transit system with the goal of making a more compact, denser and more sustainable city, which Ottawa currently is not.

Most members of the public in attendance urged the city to get the plan started as soon as possible, but several questioned the underlying logic behind it.

David Jeanes, a transit advocate and president of Transport 2000, said he was dismayed with the city's direction, and that the municipality hasn't properly looked at all the options.

"It doesn't make use of existing rail corridors, and it focuses too much on converting the existing transitway," he said. "Many potential viable options have been screened out for flimsy reasons."
Does anyone know how I could go about changing the name of this thread so it will appear different when looking at thread titles in the forum?
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Old August 14th, 2011, 12:32 AM   #37
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OTTAWA CANADA OC Transpo's New LRT

Well its been some time scince any news has ben said about Otawa's OC Transpo, the O-Train & The LRT.

Let me update you on the current events

OC Transpo Bus Service

Effective Sept 4/11
Major bus routes changes are planed

over 80 routes are going toi be either elimanted or combined.
Our Transit Commission has approved the purchaseof 75 AlexanderDensis Double Deckers(I'm not sure if its the 12m or 12.8 m version)we presently have 3.
In 2009/2010 NFI struck a deal with our City Council in whicjh OC Transpo would purchase 305 New D60LFRs(225 replacements/80 expansion). NFI would buy back the 225 D60LFs OC had in exchange OC would purchase 305 D60LFR at a reduced purchase rate(this was able to be domne due to Chicago transit cancelling their order of artic buses).

In early August OC retired the last of or Orion V's & first generation Novabuses LFS.The retirement of the ORion V's is 3 years a head of schedule. OC is now 100% Low Floor accessiable,A/C equiped and all buses are now in the Maple Leaf Paint scheme.

OC present fleet is as follows:

NFI D60LFR 305
NFI D60LF 53
NFI Invero D40i 326
Orion VI 136(although these will be retiring once the Alexander Dennis DD buses arrive)
Orion VII Hybrid 177
Alexander Dennis 3(78)(75 will be here by Sept of 2012)

O-Train

With the LRT scheduled to begin construction in a year or so, and the closure of Hurdman Statyion in 2014(due to LRT construction) the Transit Commision has approved the purchase of 6 additional Train sets, although no tender has been put out, from what I read Bombaider no longer makes the Talent Trains OC is presently using.(My thoughts are the comanies that will bid on the tender are going to be thsame companies that will bid on the LRT Project).
As well the O train service will be expanded to every 8mins instead of 15mins. This will be possible with the additional building of two more by-pass locatioons
Confederation Heights(probally at or very near the present station at thay locatoion) & Gladstone(which is near the Carlington Station).For anyone thats been to Ottawa and has ridden the O _trasin the route from Carelton University(present Stattion & By-Pass location) the tracks lead to a tunnel under Dows Lake(although its called a Lake its not very big at all)from there it goes towards Carlington station in a cut out grove in stone towards Gladstone wherer it opens up).

LRT

Ottawa set to begin one of the cities largest projects ever built in the city. With a present price tag $2.5 Billion(Canadain).

The first phase is scheduled to be from Tunney's Pasture(a federal Government Complex)run along the present Trasitway to blair Staion(with a tunnel in the cities core) The tuinnel orginally was suppose to run partly under Albert & Slater Strets then turn up Kent to Queen Street, but the depth of the tunnel would of been over 40 m deep and would reqire at least six levels of esclators to reach the Stations plateforms. To save xcost the city has decide to use most of Queen Street(not as deep 16 M I think :confused: ) In anycase it will be cheaper and with a lesser depth the contractor will be able to either use a "Cut & cover" method or boring medthed. In anycase if and when this project does ever get started the completion dated is hopefully scheduled to co-and side with the country's 150 birthday 2018.

I've included some You Tube video opf whatsome of he station might look like(barring any changes)

Ottawa's LRT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4AjguHGopw

Hurdman Station
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqK6...eature=related

Campus Station
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H27Kp...eature=related

Rideau Centre station
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHKrw...eature=related

Downtown west
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TC20l...eature=related

Downtown east
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvX5h...eature=related

I hope the links work
FINALLY I GOT THE LINKS TO WORK!!!

Stupid O 0

TOM
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Last edited by MCIBUS; August 14th, 2011 at 01:11 AM.
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Old August 30th, 2012, 11:31 PM   #38
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Service must be 11 years old now.


clickable...




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Old August 30th, 2012, 11:36 PM   #39
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Today's :
O-Train to shut down for 18 weeks

Frequency of trips to be 8 minutes instead of 15 after work is completed
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Old August 30th, 2012, 11:38 PM   #40
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TOday's :
O-Train to shut down for 18 weeks
Frequency of trips to be 8 minutes instead of 15 after work is completed
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