daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 1st, 2005, 12:41 PM   #881
huaiwei
The Monkey King
 
huaiwei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Singapore 新加坡 Singapura சிங்கப்&#2986
Posts: 11,786
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by David-80
Hehe I dont think thats the case lah! I think its because jetstarasia has no more motivation to negotiate. Because Indonesia already received proposal from Virgin blue Australia to get rights in Indonesia. Australian airlines (Qantas low cost subsdiary for asia) is also operating in Bali. So i dont think thats the problem.

cheers
Hehehe.....but Australia Airlines cant exactly be considered an LCC right...or are they? I get a feeling they are almost like SIA's silkair...a regional airline servicing niche markets?
__________________
Majulah Singapura 前进吧,新加坡!Onward Singapore முன்னேறட்டும் சிங்கப்பூர்

"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
huaiwei no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 3rd, 2005, 01:29 PM   #882
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 03 May 2005

Low cost carriers: The flight so far


After just one year, budget airlines have revolutionised aviation in the region and changed perceptions about air travel

By VEN SREENIVASAN

THIS week marks the first anniversary of the launch of services by Singapore's first homegrown low cost carrier. It was a year ago, when Valuair took to the skies. Within a space of another 6 months, Tiger Airways and JetStar Asia started services.

Meanwhile, the region has seen the proliferation of several LCC players. So perhaps it is time to take stock of the state of the industry. A lot has changed in the past one year.



The emergence of LCCs has boosted air travel, hammered down the price of air tickets, squeezed yields in the industry, put pressure on struggling Asian network carriers, revolutionised labour-management relations in the aviation industry and challenged the existing hubs across the Asia-Pacific area.

Indeed, LCCs have revolutionised aviation in the region and changed the way people here think about air travel.

Today, travellers can fly from Changi airport to Bangkok for less than the price of cab fare from Changi airport to Yishun. In fact, as Martin Symes of online discount ticket portal Zuji pointed out, ticket prices have become the subject of dinner-time conversations everywhere.

Sizeable players

Yet, changes have not come as fast as had been anticipated. Early last year, many industry experts attending the Low Cost Carrier Symposium here organised by the Asia Pacific Centre for Aviation predicted that there would be between 20 and 30 new LCC operators in the Asia-Pacific.

However, today there are only about 10 established names in this region of some 550 million people. In contrast, Western Europe, with about the same population, has some 50 LCC operators.

Besides notables like AirAsia, Valuair, Tiger Airways, JetStar Asia, Nok Air, 1-2-Go, Lion Air and Cebu Pacific, there are no other sizeable LCC players around the region. Even these notables are feeling the pressure on yields and profits.

The problem is that LCCs in Asia Pacific operate in very different circumstances compared to their US or European cousins.

For one thing, point to point flights tend to be longer, averaging four hours, compared to 2 hours in Europe and the US. This has obvious implication on utilisation rates, turnaround times and ultimately operating costs.

Also, the skies over Asia are much less free. In the US, LCCs like Southwest thrived by serving a burgeoning domestic market. Ditto over the skies of the European Union.

On the other hand, Asian LCCs have to depend on bilateral agreements and meet strict regulatory requirements on most routes. Singapore and Thailand have inked a free skies deal, which has naturally seen Singapore-based LCCs Valuair, Tiger Airways and JetStar launch flights to Thai destinations early.

But after these easy pickings, they face an uphill task getting lucrative routes elsewhere around the region. The protective inclinations of some governments such as Indonesia (which has barred all foreign LCCs) add to the problem.

The problems recently faced by JetStar Asia demonstrate this stark reality.

Unable to secure new routes quickly enough, the Qantas associate has been forced to delay taking delivery of new jets this year.

Infrastructure - or rather, the lack of it - is another hurdle. Not having access to cheaper secondary airports, LCCs have been forced to fly into major metropolitan airports, incurring the same fees and charges as their incumbent full service competitors.

And these full service carriers are able and willing to give the LCCs a run for their money.

Just as Valuair was preparing to take off in May last year, Singapore Airlines started offering return fares to Bangkok for $168 and to Hong Kong for $368, against Valuair's promotional fares of $138 and $300. And Cathay matched Valuair's $300 return price to Hong Kong, while Indonesian carrier Garuda offered cut-rate $283 return fares to the territory.

Even now, SIA and Qantas are offering fares which match those offered by Valuair to Perth.

'Any new carrier entering this market will do so at their own risk,' predicted Peter Harbison, managing director of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Aviation. 'There will be intense irrational pricing to kill upstarts.'

His words have proven to be prophetic. With astute yield and capacity management techniques, full service carriers with deep pockets here are well positioned to take on the LCCs on the latters' own terms.

And they will continue to do so as long as LCCs have no legislated protection against predatory pricing. Many in the industry have not forgotten how in the 1990s, Qantas and Ansett felt so threatened that they slashed prices to a level where it was impossible for competitors like Compass Airlines to operate in Australia.

The success of Asia's growing LCC phenomenon depends on the relaxation of air rights, better and more affordable airport infrastructure and protection against capacity dumping by incumbents.

As HSBC noted in a paper not long ago, budget operators in the region have fewer cost advantages and greater revenue disadvantages than their European peers such as Ryanair. Only time will tell whether this region will truly have a vibrant and freewheeling LCC industry.

Meanwhile, the last lucrative frontier for regional LCCs are India and China. As businessman Wong Fong Fui, a shareholder in JetStar Asia noted recently: ''If the market grows in China or in India, then all will survive. If not, there will be a bloodbath.'

Indeed, many of the region's LCCs are eyeing these two vast markets as they slowly open up their skies. But these countries are seeing a proliferation of their own domestic LCCs, and it remains to be seen whether their governments will succumb to inherent protective instincts.

But it is not bad news everywhere. Tiger Airways, for example, is now carrying more passengers inbound than outbound from Singapore. This is a first for any Singapore-based LCC.

And it vindicates the long-held claim by LCC operators that theirs is a business which truly supports regional tourism.

It also underscores their important role as catalysts for regional integration - at least for the masses.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2005, 05:08 PM   #883
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

Ryanair to begin daily flights from Portugal to Frankfurt

LISBON, April 29 (AFP) - The Irish cut-price airline Ryanair, which began flying from Portugal in January, will start operating daily flights from Oporto to Frankfurt on October 30, airport officials said Friday.

The airline began flying twice a day from London to Oporto, Portugal's second-largest city, in January.

Passenger traffic at Oporto airport jumped 13 percent to 807,437 during the first quarter of 2005, a 13 percent increase over the same time last year due in large part to the arrival of Ryanair, Europe's biggest no-frills airline, and its German rival Air Berlin, it said in a statement.

It added that Portuguese flag-carrier TAP-Portugal began a new daily flight Friday from Oporto to Rome.

Oporto airport currently offers regular flights to over 30 destinations.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2005, 05:41 PM   #884
David-80
Le Nozze di Figaro...
 
David-80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 7,129

Uh , cebu pacific is not an LCC, its full carrier just like PAL, their price is not that lower compare to Airasia, jetstar, etc and Cebu pacific also serves full meal and drink.


Quote:
Hehehe.....but Australia Airlines cant exactly be considered an LCC right...or are they? I get a feeling they are almost like SIA's silkair...a regional airline servicing niche markets?
Something like Silkair, but Australian airlines is cheaper than Qantas. Also they dont serve business or first class. All economy class seating.

cheers
__________________
Intel Inside, Idiot outside
David-80 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 01:37 AM   #885
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

May 5, 2005
Valuair: Bumpy flight a year after take-off
1st budget airline here hit by rising fuel cost, price wars and entry of more low-cost carriers

By Krist Boo

AS IT celebrates its first birthday today, the airline that kicked off low-cost air travel with much fanfare in Singapore says the skies don't look quite as friendly as they did a year ago.

In fact, unexpected turbulence in the industry has made the past year a struggle, admits Valuair chairman Lim Chin Beng, 71.

Valuair took off on its maiden flight to Bangkok at about noon on this day a year ago.

Since then, it has been at pains to position itself as a mid-cost rather than a budget airline, providing basic amenities, like meals, assigned seating and baggage allowances, that budget carriers usually sacrifice in the name of rock-bottom fares.

Budget carrier or not, Valuair has not been spared the three whammies that, to varying degrees, have also hurt its main Singapore-based rivals: Jetstar Asia and Tiger Airways.

The first and biggest problem has been surging fuel costs, which shot from an already painful US$58 (S$96) a barrel last November to a record high of US$78 last month.

Since its launch, Valuair has seen its fuel spending shoot up by 75 per cent. If that wasn't enough, full-service carriers attacked them with a merciless round of fare slashing.

When Valuair launched promotional fares of $138 to Bangkok and $300 to Hong Kong last May, Singapore Airlines virtually matched its offers, with $168 and $368 respectively.

Other full-service airlines such as Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific and Indonesian carrier Garuda also joined in the fray.

Valuair had no choice but to respond. It now sells its cheapest return tickets to Bangkok for $119 and to Hong Kong for $219.

Mr Lim said: 'When we planned this airline, there did not appear to be any other budget carriers.' That changed very quickly. Now, besides the three budget carriers based here, two others also pass through Changi.

'If there were only one or two, the full-service carriers would have been more tolerant. But suddenly there were so many. The full-service carriers felt threatened.'

In the past year, Valuair has sold about 60 per cent of seats on its four Airbus 320s. But like Tiger and Jetstar Asia, it is bleeding red ink.

True, it had not expected to break even in the first year, but now the airline cannot even predict when this might happen.

'It depends on fuel prices, which is beyond our control,' Mr Lim said.

Aviation observers have predicted that Valuair would be the first to fold in this tough environment. Of the three budget carriers based here, Valuair has the weakest backing.

That perception of vulnerability was not enhanced by the abrupt resignation last month of 55-year-old chief executive Sim Kay Wee, reportedly over 'tension' within its management.

Mr Lim, now interim CEO, said: 'As far as deep pockets are concerned, we have a big disadvantage. Everybody knows that.'

Star Cruises owns 20 per cent of its shares, valued at over $10 million. Other shareholders include a group of companies and local individuals, including Mr Lim himself.

In contrast, Tiger Airways has backers including Singapore Airlines and Temasek Holdings, while Jetstar Asia counts Qantas and also Temasek among its investors.

No injection of funds is in the pipeline for Valuair yet, though the airline is actively seeking investors.

It is also planning to expand its current network of six cities to airports in India, Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia and Macau. If fuel prices slide, it is not ruling out acquiring wide-bodied aircraft, such as the Boeing 777, to ply the Australian east coast, Japan and South Korea.

It now flies to Jakarta, Hong Kong, Perth and the Chinese cities of Chengdu and Xiamen.

Hopes of an initial public offering (IPO) by 2007 have also not been abandoned, said Mr Lim.

His birthday wish for the airline: 'That we will be able to grow and be profitable so that we can go for an IPO.'

Making the Tiger roar

'Even in one year, airlines such as Tiger Airways have transformed people's expectations and travel habits. There are now short trips, shopping trips, beach trips.

Competition is about offering the best product at the lowest possible price. The companies that are unable to compete effectively - ultimately that's their problem.

You have to be a very brave airline to enter Singapore - what would be the most fiercely contested low-cost carrier market in Asia.

Whether everyone will survive in Singapore? Clearly I am very confident Tiger Airways will survive, but I can't speak for my competitors. '

MR TONY DAVIS, chief executive of Tiger Airways, which started flights last September

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 04:50 AM   #886
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

Ryanair beats Aer Lingus in cheap stakes
Aideen Sheehan
3 May 2005
Irish Independent

National carrier proves dearer for most European holiday destinations

RYANAIR has come out cheaper than Aer Lingus for most comparable flights in a random survey by the Irish Independent.With the holiday season starting, Ryanair was cheaper than Aer Lingus for flights from Dublin to a number of European destinations booked both last-minute and up to three months ahead of departure.

If you fancied spending next weekend in Paris, a flight with Ryanair would be just over a third of the price charged by Aer Lingus - at €139 compared to €380 for flights leaving on Friday night and returning on Monday evening.

However, your journey to and from the airport would be at least 30 minutes longer with Ryanair, which flies to Beauvais, compared with Aer Lingus, which flies to Charles de Gaulle.

Booking a similar weekend in late June would be over twice as expensive with Aer Lingus - €170 compared with Ryanair's €70.

A week in Rome would also be substantially cheaper with Ryanair (which has just opened a new route there from Dublin), particularly if you booked well ahead, when you'd get a flight for €118 compared to €221 with Aer Lingus.

Flying to Malaga for a fortnight would be substantially cheaper with Ryanair if you wanted to head off next Saturday, when you'd get a return flight for €161 compared to €280 with Aer Lingus.

Flights to Faro on the Portuguese Algarve also came out well over €100 more expensive with Aer Lingus both next week and later in the summer.

However, for flights to the UK the differences were less marked, and Aer Lingus was sometimes cheaper than Ryanair.

For example, you'd save over €60 by flying with Aer Lingus if you wanted to go from Dublin to Manchester next Friday evening, returning on Monday evening, and the price was almost identical at €67 for a similar weekend in late June.

For flights from Cork to London, Ryanair had the best deal if you were booking to go over the August bank holiday weekend but Aer Lingus was slightly cheaper for similar timings next weekend.

All the prices quoted include taxes, charges and internet credit card booking fees which are €4 with Aer Lingus and €5 for a return flight with Ryanair. They were all researched last Thursday.

Ryanair remains much more limited than Aer Lingus in terms of the number of routes it serves directly from Ireland.

Aer Lingus has greatly expanded its range of routes in recent times and now serves over 50 European and US destinations, including cities such as Naples, Bilbao, Prague and Dubrovnik.

The variation in prices shows it is vital to shop around if you want the best deal, with flexibility the best way of getting a bargain.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 06:07 AM   #887
Mike
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 509
Likes (Received): 12

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Ryanair to begin daily flights from Portugal to Frankfurt
Ryanair cannot afford to fly into Frankfurt. They are flying to Hahn instead. From Hahn to Frankfurt takes you about 1:30h by car if there is no traffic jam, if there is a jam then it can take you over 2 hours. If Hahn would be considered part of the Frankfurt metro, Frankfurt would be larger than London. It's a joke.
Mike no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 06:22 AM   #888
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

Ryanair tends to refer to these secondary airports with the nearest large city name, such as Frankfurt Hahn, Brussels Charleroi, and Girona Barcelona.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 01:28 PM   #889
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 05 May 2005

Valuair eyes foray into medium-haul market

Head-on competition with full-service carriers if it flies to eastern Australia

By VEN SREENIVASAN

(SINGAPORE) Budget carrier Valuair is looking at spreading its wings to the medium-haul market using wide-bodied aircraft.



Chairman and founder Lim Chin Beng says the company is 'seriously studying' possible services to eastern Australia, which could include the major cities of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.

This would put Valuair in head-on competition with full-service carriers such as Singapore Airlines, Qantas, British Airways, Emirates and others.

'We have been looking into the possibility of using wide-bodied planes like the Airbus 330, Airbus 340 or the Boeing 777 for such medium-haul routes,' Mr Lim told BT. Valuair could start the service initially with 'two or three' leased planes, he said.

Besides eastern Australia, medium-haul flights could conceivably take Valuair to the far reaches of the Indian sub-continent and northern China.

And if indeed Valuair does go into medium haul, it would be the first discount carrier to go beyond the four-hour radius that is typical of the breed.

Mr Lim stressed that any final decision on entering the medium-haul market will depend on fuel prices receding. 'If fuel remains at current levels, it will be too expensive for us to operate wide-bodied aircraft,' he said. 'We can only do this if oil falls below US$40 per barrel.'

The price of oil has leapt more than 50 per cent this year, with Brent crude hovering around US$50. Fuel accounts for 26 per cent of Valuair's total costs.

Mr Lim hinted that medium-haul flights would target business travellers. 'They already comprise about 40 per cent of our customers,' he said. 'Our model is based on providing businessmen with value travel - but with dignity.'

Unlike its no-frills rivals, Valuair offers a 20kg baggage allowance, simple meals and allocated seats with a 34-inch pitch.

Given the carrier's popularity with business travellers, Mr Lim envisages that wide-bodied Valuair jets could have relatively more business class seats than full-service airlines. But it would charge significantly less for them.

'What do businessmen want? Champagne, caviar and kebaya-clad women? Or comfort, up-to-date on-board Internet connectivity and friendly service?' Mr Lim asked.

Valuair aims to provide mid-tier products for value-conscious travellers. 'In every consumer product except airlines there is a whole range to choose from,' he said. 'Now that this industry is opening up, I don't see why we should be any different from other products such as automobiles or watches. We should also be able to offer consumers a choice.'

Mr Lim said Valuair's loads averaged 60 per cent over the past 12 months, and that prior to the December 26, 2004 tsunami the average load factor was around 80 per cent.

The airline - which tomorrow celebrates the anniversary of its first flight - operates four leased Airbus A320s on its routes to Hong Kong, Bangkok, Jakarta, Perth, Xiamen and Chengdu. It is looking at leasing two more aircraft within 12 months to cater for network growth.

One of its more popular offerings is a 'fly-cruise' package with Star Cruises. The world's third-largest cruise operator controls 20 per cent of Valuair after it injected about US$15 million earlier this year.

Star chairman Lim Kok Thay was quoted recently as saying the company is keen on lifting its stake in Valuair when the carrier needs funds to expand. In fact, Star's participation and funding would be critical to Valuair's plans to get into the medium-haul market.

Meanwhile, Valuair says it has received an overwhelming response to its 'buy one-get one free' anniversary ticket deal. When BT visited its ticketing office at Toa Payoh Hub on Tuesday, people were queueing to buy.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 01:44 PM   #890
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 05 May 2005

Time to review air pact


CONDITIONS may be right for Singapore-Malaysia air links to finally come under serious review. Low cost carriers (LCCs) such as Tiger Airways, Valuair, AirAsia and Jetstar Asia would love to get a slice of the potentially huge market for cheap flights between Changi and destinations in Malaysia. And no single route is more keenly sought after than the highly lucrative - but totally unavailable - 45-minute hop between Singapore and Kuala Lumpur. This is the region's fourth busiest route, carrying an estimated eight million passengers last year.

Singapore Airlines and Malaysia Airlines service this route almost as a duopoly. The two national carriers control eight out of 10 available flights a week between the two destinations, with the remainder served by carriers such as Air India and Japan Airlines, exercising their 5th Freedom rights to pick up passengers at one foreign point and put them down in another foreign point as part of continuous operation also serving the airline's homeland. Having just two big players has meant high fares: a round trip between Changi and Sepang costs over $300, double the fare between Changi and Bangkok's Don Muang via an LCC. In fact, it is actually cheaper to fly from Singapore to KL via Bangkok with an LCC. This is an anachronism at a time when the regional aviation scene is undergoing rapid changes.

There are currently about a dozen LCC players operating in Thailand, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore. There could be as many as 30 LCC start-ups emerging in this region in the next few years. And LCCs already account for about 7 per cent of the passenger traffic at Changi. It is triple this number in KL, the headquarters of the region's biggest LCC - AirAsia. Despite the reluctance of some governments in the region to open up their skies to LCCs, low cost air travel is here to stay. The advent of LCCs has created a phenomenon which industry insiders call the 'commoditisation' of air travel. In short, supply of new service providers is boosting demand by driving down prices. Suddenly, flying has become an affordable mode of travel for many in this region.

Meanwhile, the three decades-old air services agreement between Malaysia and Singapore is stuck in a time-warp. While the two national carriers control the 300 km Singapore-KL route, 12 airlines fly between Singapore and Bangkok and 13 fly the Singapore-Jakarta route. There are about 300 weekly flights between Singapore and Hong Kong, Bangkok and Jakarta, compared to just 184 between Singapore and KL.

Asean is edging towards limited open skies by 2015. But some countries have already 'fast-tracked' this via bilateral agreements. The most prominent example is the Singapore-Thailand free-skies deal. Given their proximity, and economic and cultural links - and the steady warming of ties between them - a review of the air services agreement between Malaysia and Singapore is long overdue. Thailand should also be a partner in a new pact which would free up the skies above a fifth of the region's 550 million people. And it would also act as a strong catalyst to speed up an Asean open skies treaty.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2005, 04:09 PM   #891
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

EasyJet Would Consider Hedging At $30-40/Bbl Oil Price
4 May 2005

LONDON (Dow Jones)--U.K. budget airline easyJet PLC (EZJ.LN) would consider hedging its fuel costs if the oil price fell back to $30 to $40 a barrel, Chief Executive Ray Webster said Wednesday.

Hedging at these levels "will be very attractive," Webster told Dow Jones Newswires.

EasyJet's hedging protection mostly expired at the end of April, although it does have some protection through to the end of June.

"Where oil is at the moment, we are taking the spot price," he said. Brent crude is trading at around $50.9 a barrel.

The airline is due to release its results for the six months to March 31 at the end of May.

EasyJet could expand to around 300 aircraft over the longer term, Webster added. At the end of September, easyJet will have about 108 aircraft in its fleet.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2005, 01:59 PM   #892
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 06 May 2005

Tiger to add two weekly flights to the Philippines

By VEN SREENIVASAN

(SINGAPORE) Tiger Airways is increasing its services to the Philippines to five flights a week from the current three in response to strong demand, the low-cost carrier said.

The additonal flights will start on June 6.

The Singapore Airlines associate started flights to Clark Field, about an hour's drive north of Manila, on April 5. The airport was part of the US air base prior to the American troop pullout over a decade ago.

Tony Davis, Tiger's chief executive, said seats were fully booked up until June and there was strong forward booking until the end of July. He added that the additional flights were in response to requests from officials at Clark Development Corp.

Tiger is selling tickets for travel between Changi and Clark from as low as $14.98, compared to around $400 charged by full-service carriers like Philippine Airlines.

But it also competes with rival Singapore-based budget carrier Jetstar Asia, which flies daily directly to Manila's Ninoy Aquino International Airport. Then there is Malaysia's AirAsia, which also flies to Clark.

Besides the holiday traffic, both Tiger and Jetstar have also been eyeing a significant captive market comprising some 100,000 Filipinos living in Singapore. Many Filipinos also use Changi airport as a transit point to third countries and other regions.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2005, 03:13 PM   #893
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

Ryanair faces bill if it fails to fill seats
Eugene Hogan
05 May 2005
Irish Independent

RYANAIR will have to pay €10 for every seat it fails to fill under new passenger number guidelines, it has emerged.

The 'no frills' airline will be hit with the added cost if it fails to meet the 1.5 million passenger mark through Shannon Airport during the next 12 months.

On the day it commenced its 26 daily flights on 14 international routes from Shannon, Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary gave an insight into what will be an extremely expensive deal for the company should it fail to deliver on its promises.

"If we only deliver 1.45 million passengers, then we are going to have to pay over €500,000," he said.

The Ryanair chief, however, said he has "no doubt" they will reach the 1.5 million passenger target in the first year, right up to two million passengers per annum by year five.

Meanwhile, Mr O'Leary yesterday confirmed that his company will press ahead with legal action under Irish and EU competition law and public procurement law to prevent Aer Rianta from being the body to develop the second terminal at Dublin Airport.

The Ryanair chief also confirmed that pilot John Goss had been reinstated as per High Court order of last week.

He added Mr Goss was not yet back on active flying duty but would be "shortly".
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2005, 03:17 PM   #894
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

Ryanair Carried 2.66M Passengers In April Vs 2.14M
05 May 2005
Edited Press Release

LONDON (Dow Jones)--Ryanair PLC said Thursday it flew 2,656,855 passengers in April, up 24% from 2,142,545 a year earlier.

Load factor, which represents the number of passengers as a proportion of the number of seats available, fell to 81% from 82% for April.

For the 12 months to date, Ryanair flew 28,108,233 passengers with a load factor of 84%.

The company said 98% of seat sales were via the Ryanair internet site, compared with 97% a year earlier.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2005, 03:20 PM   #895
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

Ryanair Springs Forward
05 May 2005

LONDON (Dow Jones)--So a flying start for Ryanair (RYAAY) this year: April passenger numbers up 24% on the year to almost 2.7 million and load factor on course at 81%.

Not bad, considering the mounting evidence of a consumer spending pullback in the U.K. and Europe.

But before you get carried away, it's worth mulling just how many additional passengers in April were headed to Rome for the papal events. Ryanair doesn't break out performance on its routes on a monthly basis.

Nor does the airline discuss yields, which is as an important a measure as ever for the industry while fuel charges continue to eat into profitability.

This is all the more crucial for low-cost airlines, since fuel surcharges make up a large portion of their forecast summer fares.

For punters circling Ryanair's shares, still down some 13% on February's high for the year, prudence might be advisable, at least until after British Airways (BAB) turns in its April figures later this afternoon and easyJet (EZJ.LN) follows on Monday.

There has been a shift in consumer patterns in recent years and holidays abroad are now seen as essential where they were once luxury perks.

But that doesn't mean the no-frills airline sector will be impervious to a consumer slowdown any more than retailers have proven to be. Gray skies may yet be on the horizon.

(Robb M. Stewart has been a reporter for more than a decade, covering business and finance from Canada, Sweden and the U.K.)
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2005, 12:52 PM   #896
huaiwei
The Monkey King
 
huaiwei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Singapore 新加坡 Singapura சிங்கப்&#2986
Posts: 11,786
Likes (Received): 4

Hoho...sure they will have plenty of passengers now with that cheap cheap intro offer, but wait till the actual fare kicks in. People will probably flock to Jetstar with its direct Ninoy airport flights!
__________________
Majulah Singapura 前进吧,新加坡!Onward Singapore முன்னேறட்டும் சிங்கப்பூர்

"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
huaiwei no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 8th, 2005, 06:26 AM   #897
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by huaiwei
Hoho...sure they will have plenty of passengers now with that cheap cheap intro offer, but wait till the actual fare kicks in. People will probably flock to Jetstar with its direct Ninoy airport flights!
Flock?? Got so many people going Philippines???
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 8th, 2005, 10:00 AM   #898
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,706
Likes (Received): 2

08 May 2005

Asia's low-cost airlines facing big challenges after year of strong growth


SINGAPORE : Asia's low-cost carriers are facing big challenges despite a tremendous year of growth as their established premium rivals sharply lower their fares in response to the competition, industry analysts said.

Budget airlines will find it increasingly difficult to rely on just cheap tickets to entice travellers now that full-service carriers have also slashed fares on the same routes without compromising in-flight service, they said.

"It's never been a better time to travel," said Andrew Herdman, director-general of the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines in Kuala Lumpur.

"Established carriers have been driving up their cost efficiencies, improving their performance and the cost differentials between the established carriers and the new entrants are narrowing."

Andrew Drysdale, the regional vice president of the International Air Transport Association, agreed that the low-cost airlines were coming under sustained pressure.

"They are coming up against some of the best airlines in the world and profitable airlines so it will be tough for them," he said.

Consumers in Asia, home to some of the world's most profitable carriers such as Singapore Airlines (SIA) and Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific, have seen fares tumble dramatically over the past year.

For example, recent advertisements placed by SIA in the local papers here show the carrier charging promotional fares to some of the region's popular destinations that are comparable to its budget rivals.

An economy class two-way ticket to Jakarta on SIA, with the condition that there must be a minimum of two passengers, now costs 128 Singapore dollars. The same trip in March 2004 would have set one back by more than 500 dollars.

Valuair, Singapore's first budget carrier which began operations on May 5 last year, charges 149 dollars for a round-trip to the Indonesian capital on condition that the journey is completed within seven days.

SIA's regional wing, SilkAir, also announced this week a similar round of heavy promotional discounts to 12 destinations.

Drysdale said another hurdle that could hold back budget carriers from expanding their reach is that Asia's skies are still highly regulated, which means they need to acquire air rights before they can fly a route.

This is unlike the environment in Europe or the United States.

"They have issues of air rights which needs to be overcome ... it needs to be understood that air rights are in fact trade agreements between governments and these governments will trade those agreements," he said.

Singapore, which is investing heavily to promote the city-state as a regional hub for budget carriers, has also listed Asia's regulatory environment as one obstacle facing low-cost airlines.

"While some countries, such as China, Thailand and Brunei have liberalised their aviation markets, most Asian countries are still very protective of their air rights," Transport Minister Yeo Cheow Tong said last week.

"Some prefer to protect their national airlines, foregoing the benefits that increased air travel and tourism can bring to their national economies.

"Others are concerned about the new dimension of competition that LCCs (low cost carriers) could bring to their national carriers."

Of the leading regional budget carriers, Andrew Miller, chief executive officer for consulting at the Sydney-based Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, said Malaysia's AirAsia looks to be the strongest.

Miller said its founder, Tony Fernandes, recognised the potential of the market earlier than anyone else and has been one of the industry's most creative figures.

"He (Fernandes) has two years ahead of the market and he has been very inventive ... he does stand out in terms of the speed which he has grown the market," Miller said.

In February, AirAsia announced its three months to December net profit rose to 12 million US dollars from 2.8 million due to a strong pickup in demand.

In Singapore, Valuair, Tiger Airways and Jetstar Asia now account for seven percent of all flights at Changi international airport, despite being in the air for barely a year.

Transport Minister Yeo described their growth as "phenomenal", pointing out there are now 175 low-cost flights from Singapore each week servicing 15 destinations, up from 70 weekly flights to six cities six months ago.

However the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines' Herdman said the budget airline industry will inevitably have some failures as they meet the challenges, despite the year of strong growth.

"We just have to see how it evolves but in Europe there have been failures ... that's just the market working, that's what happens in other industries as well," he said.- AFP/ir

Copyright © 2005 Agence France Presse. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 9th, 2005, 07:52 PM   #899
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18158

LCCs in Europe

Low-cost air travel shrinks a continent
9 May 2005
South China Morning Post

AT ANY GIVEN moment during the day, there are more than 3,500 aircraft crisscrossing the skies over Europe, carrying about 400,000 passengers. Ten per cent of them are operated by the 60 low-cost airlines that started operations after the deregulation of Europe's skies in the 1990s.

In the past 12 months, more than 2.5 million passengers have travelled on easyJet, the largest low-cost fleet in Europe, to destinations ranging from Belfast to Bratislava and Cagliari to Copenhagen.

It was not that long ago that business travellers and tourists had to contend with costly and time-consuming train journeys, expressway tolls and the stratospheric fares of the national "flag-carrier" airlines. Little wonder, then, that millions have taken to the low-cost skies.

The remarkable story of Europe's low-cost air travel began in earnest with the creation of the European Union in November 1993. A three-stage liberalisation process was completed in four years, and on April 1, 1997, domestic routes were opened up to foreign competitors.

The inspiration for all this came from the successful American model (deregulation in the United States took place in the 1970s). But Europe's timing was also fortuitous - the internet was taking off at the same time as the pioneering new airlines. Today, almost all budget airline bookings are made online. The bigger national airlines have been playing catch-up in recent years, but new players such as easyJet, Ryanair and Wizzair continue to make the innovative moves - in cyberspace and in the clouds.

The revolution in air travel has transformed European lifestyles. Estonians who could not leave the Soviet Union until the early 1990s now fly to London for weekend shopping trips. In the picturesque French region of Dordogne, locals now refer to the area as "Dordogne-shire", in reference to all the British visitors flying in to buy up holiday homes.

Ireland's economic surge is being helped in part by a seasonal tourist boom by visitors from the south of Europe eager to escape the heat of the Mediterranean summer.

Budget airline travel has helped the fortunes of towns in Europe's former rustbelt, such as Northern England's Newcastle and Germany's Dortmund.

The sky's the limit once a town appears on the "no-frills" carrier route-map. Countless "secondary destinations", such as Sweden's Malmo and Poland's Wraclow, now boast "buzzing" nightlife districts.

Meanwhile, across the 25-country European Union, with a population of 460 million, marriage between different nationalities is at an all-time high.

There have been some casualties in the air travel race. The national carriers of Switzerland and Belgium, Swiss Air and Sabena, folded in 2001, while other flag-carriers are struggling to compete with their vastly cheaper rivals.

Nevertheless, in less than a generation, European air travel has evolved into a powerful symbol of a unified and modern Europe.

In the process, Europeans have changed not only their travel choices but the way they live.

The United States of Europe feels more and more like a reality these days, in part thanks to the low-cost carriers. One Wizzair flier, Imre Petrasovits, said: "Europe feels like a small friendly town whenever I travel between London and Budapest. Without low-cost airlines, I'd feel like an isolated economic migrant on the other side of Europe, rather than simply a European with two homes."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 9th, 2005, 09:57 PM   #900
Monkey
BANNED
 
Monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Londinium
Posts: 14,108
Likes (Received): 38

Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey
Rolling 12 month passenger totals to March 2005:
EasyJet = 26,996,777
Ryanair = 27,593,923

Percentage increase in passengers since March 2004:
EasyJet = 28.9%
Ryanair = 20%

Load factor (ie percentage bums on seats) in March 2005:
EasyJet = 91.2%
Ryanair = 80%
Rolling 12 month passenger totals to April 2005:
EasyJet = 27,487,296
Ryanair = 28,108,233

Percentage increase in passengers since April 2004:
EasyJet = 25.2%
Ryanair = 24%

Load factor (ie percentage bums on seats) in April 2005:
EasyJet = 85.2%
Ryanair = 81%
Monkey no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium