daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 13th, 2005, 04:26 AM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

✈ | BO | Bolivian Airlines and Aviation

Bolivia's Airport Workers Call For Strike
9 June 2005

(Dow Jones) The economy of crisis-ridden Bolivia may take another beating as its air traffic is likely to be reduced after workers at the country's airport administration and services authority, Aasana, called for a strike, the Bolivian news Web site Bolivia.com said Thursday.

Omar Alcon, a leader of Aasana employees, said the national directory of the Aasana workers union had decided to call for an indefinite strike at all airports in the country starting midday Thursday. The strike would be in support of protests across Bolivia demanding a nationalization of its oil and gas industry, and a constitutional assembly to reshape the country.

Officials at Aasana contacted by Dow Jones Newswires couldn't be reached for comment.

It wasn't immediately clear, if or how much air traffic had been affected Thursday.

The strike also aims at rejecting a possible nomination of current Senate leader Hormando Vaca Diez, a conservative lawyer and land owner, as a replacement for President Carlos Mesa, who announced his resignation Monday, the Web site said.

Bolivia's Congress is set to meet in the country's historical capital Sucre later Thursday to decide whether to accept Mesa's resignation, and choose a successor. Riot police clashed with protesting miners near the site of the planned session, the Associated Press said.

Other parts of the economy have already been harmed by weeks of street protests and road blockades that in recent days have led to shortages of gasoline and food in the country's administrative capital, La Paz.

Radical farmers have also occupied seven small oil fields belonging to Bolivian firm Chaco, in which BP PLC (BP) holds a minority stake, and Spanish-Argentine oil company Repsol-YPF (REP), halting 13% of Bolivia's daily oil output of about 45,000 barrels.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 30th, 2006, 10:56 PM   #2
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

Airline workers take over two Bolivian airports
30 March 2006

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - Airline workers took over three airports Thursday, demanding the nationalization of Lloyd Aereo Boliviano, which is on the verge of bankruptcy.

Flights to the cities of Cochabamba and Tarija were stopped as hundreds of LAB employees used airplanes, cars and mobile stairways and other equipment to block runways. Flights to the city of Santa Cruz have been delayed.

Television footage showed riot police shooting canisters of tear gas and violently clashing with workers as they neared the airport runways in Cochabamba, leaving a few injured.

The woes of LAB -- just-under-half-owned by Bolivian public entities -- began in February when its pilots and other workers walked off the job, demanding back wages as well as payment of the carrier's debt to the public pension system.

The carrier has a total of more than US$160 million (euro133 million) in debt.

The Bolivian government intervened in the management of airline several weeks ago, ending that strike. But new walkouts resumed last week after the Constitutional Court declared the intervention illegal and LAB president Ernesto Asbun returned to the helm.

Many of its more than 2,000 workers accuse Asbun of trying to bring LAB into bankruptcy as a prelude to forming a new company, and have said they will not return as long as he heads up the airline.

Angel Zaballa, who headed the government intervention of LAB, has blamed the company administrators for the financial crisis, calling it the "fruit of years of mismanagement."

New leftist President Evo Morales went further, describing Asbun as "mafioso" and "criminal," saying he had bribed the Constitutional Court to rule in his favor.

The carrier is also facing legal action from U.S.-based Pegasus Aviation, which has filed suit in Miami to have four Boeing jets it rented to LAB impounded if they land in the United States.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 1st, 2006, 05:00 AM   #3
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

Bolivia's airports under military control after strike disrupts flights
By FIONA SMITH
31 March 2006

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - Military and police forces took control of Bolivia's major airports Friday, a day after hundreds of striking airline workers blocked runways and disrupted flights to three airports.

The actiono was ordered by the government to "safeguard the lives and physical safety of Bolivians and avoid an airline accident," said Hector Arce, the vice minister of governmental coordination.

Angry employees of carrier Lloyd Aereo Boliviano, which is on the verge of bankruptcy, demanded the company's nationalization and clashed with police at airports Thursday.

The woes of the airline began in February when its pilots and other workers walked off the job, demanding back wages as well as payment of the carrier's debt to the public pension system. The carrier has more than $160 million in debt.

The company is controlled by foreign investors, with the Bolivian people -- not the government -- holding just under 50 percent of the shares. The Bolivian portion is held in a trust, managed by foreign financial institutions, that cannot legally be touched by the Bolivian state.

The government intervened in the management of the airline several weeks ago, ending the earlier strike. But new walkouts resumed last week after the Constitutional Court declared the intervention illegal.

Flights in Bolivia were operating at near normal levels Thursday although Lloyd Aereo Boliviano has indefinitely canceled all its international flights.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2006, 06:14 AM   #4
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

Employees struggle to keep troubled Bolivian airline aloft
By DAN KEANE
27 July 2006

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - Employees of Lloyd Aereo Boliviano on Thursday defied a Bolivian government order to stop selling tickets for international flights, saying the routes are key to saving the nearly bankrupt carrier -- and their jobs.

"(The government) should be helping us solve this problem," said Pedro Barrios, a 30-year LAB employee. "Instead, they're beating us down."

The sales came in defiance of Tuesday's order by Bolivian Superintendent of Transportation Wilson Villaroel that LAB stop booking travelers on its scheduled flights to Miami, Washington D.C., Mexico City and Panama City. Villaroel cited the airline's "operational incapacity" as the reason for the ban.

But the superintendent said Thursday he would consider lifting the ban following meetings with LAB executives, who hoped to convince the him that the carrier was financially stable enough to provide reliable service.

"It is the desire of all Bolivians" that LAB survive, Villaroel said.

In a LAB office in the capital of La Paz, handwritten signs urged passengers to contribute to a fund supporting the employees, who are owed some US$1.2 million (euro940,000) in back wages. Beneath one sign, someone had left a large sack of rice.

"People say, how can you live without salaries?" said Gloria Sandi, a 14-year LAB secretary and union leader. "But we live just like all the unemployed in this country. We borrow, until we can't borrow anymore."

LAB's recent troubles began in February, when pilots and other workers walked off the job to demand back wages as well as payment of the carrier's debt to the public pension system. Former CEO Ernesto Asbun, accused of embezzlement, has since fled to Argentina and is being sought by authorities.

Bolivian President Evo Morales has blamed corruption during the partial privatization and capitalization of LAB in 1997 for its woes and has called Asbun a "mafioso" and "criminal."

The carrier is currently operating with just three airplanes, down from 14 in December, and runs about 50 percent fewer flights than it did last year. So far, the airline has survived the fleet reduction by often combining two or three routes into single flights with multiple stops.

An LAB flight scheduled for Sunday from Santa Cruz to Miami was delayed for two days for lack of fuel, stranding 152 passengers before it finally departed Tuesday night.

Morales has refused LAB employees' demands to re-nationalize the airline, and Villaroel on Thursday reiterated the government's hands-off approach.

"The government supports (LAB), but we will not support them financially," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2006, 11:33 PM   #5
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

British company rescues troubled Bolivian airline

LA PAZ, Bolivia, Aug 10 (Reuters) - British company Transatlantic Aviation Ltd. has agreed to acquire a 50 per cent stake in Lloyd Aereo Boliviano (LAB), an official at Bolivia's debt-riddled flagship airline said on Thursday.

The terms of the deal were not revealed, but LAB General Manager Frank Taendler told local radio the investment will allow the carrier to resume many regular flights recently suspended because of the company's financial troubles.

With a fleet of 14 planes, LAB has been struggling to stay afloat amid mounting debt that totals $180 million, according to company reports.

The airline was a state company until it was semi-privatized in 1996, when the Bolivian government sold a 50 percent stake to Brazilian airline Viacao Aerea Sao Paulo (VASP).

In 2001, VASP sold its stake to Bolivian businessman Ernesto Asbun, who fled to Spain last month after being accused of mismanaging the company.

The Bolivian government has filed an extradition request seeking Asbun, who faces charges of fraud in the Andean country.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 15th, 2007, 06:20 AM   #6
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

One-day strike over back wages halts Bolivia's busiest airport
14 November 2007

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - A one-day stoppage by workers demanding back pay forced authorities to cancel all flights at Bolivia's busiest airport on Wednesday.

Employees at Viru Viru International Airport in the eastern city of Santa Cruz called a 24-hour strike to demand two months' of back pay frozen by the government. President Evo Morales' administration has placed a hold on the funds while investigating allegations of corruption at Viru Viru.

Among the flights canceled was American Airlines' Tuesday night-Wednesday circuit from Miami to La Paz to Santa Cruz and back to Miami.

Service at the airport, however, was expected to return to normal Thursday.

Santa Cruz is a center of opposition to Morales's leftist government. In October, airport officials demanded airlines pay their landing fees to local authorities in cash, rather than deposit the money with the government's aviation agency.

Morales ordered soldiers to take control of the airport, but later withdrew the troops to avoid bloodshed as thousands of Santa Cruz residents seized the facility.

The relatively rich state of Santa Cruz has long sought greater autonomy from Bolivia's central government, demanding a bigger share of its natural gas revenues. Morales argues that the cash should go to help other poorer parts of the country.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2008, 06:41 PM   #7
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

Bolivian Plane Crash-Lands, All Survive
1 February 2008

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - A plane carrying more than 150 people crash-landed in a bog in eastern Bolivia on Friday after fierce storms turned it away from its destination and it tried to reach another airport hundreds of miles away, according to officials and news reports. All on board survived.

Photographs by local media showed the charter Boeing 727, flown by a local airline, in a flooded forest clearing, stripped of at least one wing. A set of landing gear was in the water nearby.

"We noticed the engines went out, and there was this calm," Paolo Bravo, a Bolivian senator who was on board, told the radio network Erbol.

"Then they told us, 'Crash positions! Crash positions!' and it was just another two or three seconds before we hit," he said.

"I think you could call it a belly flop," Bravo added. "The plane fell, the wings broke off, but the fuselage was OK."

The plane took off from the Bolivian capital, La Paz, but severe storms forced it to turn away from its destination in the northern city of Cobija. It then headed some 370 miles south to the eastern lowland city of Trinidad and was three miles short of the runway when the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing.

The plane's flight engineer said it experienced mechanical failure, according to Juan Carlos Zambrano, a reporter on the scene for Radio Patuju.

The plane's original takeoff from La Paz had been delayed for an hour due to unspecified technical problems, said spokesman Abdon Porcel of the Superintendent of Transportation, a non-governmental agency demanding investigation into the crash.

Airline spokesman Gustavo Viscarra said the cause was still under investigation. "It was the decision of the pilot to make a forced landing," he said.

The airline's manager in Trinidad, Patricia Aruz, said no one was killed. Most of the passengers were taken to nearby hospitals for review and several were injured, Zambrano said.

Viscarra said the plane was carrying 155 passengers but gave no figures for the number of crew.

But Zambrano, citing the flight engineer, said the plane had only 154 seats but was carrying 159 passengers, along with nine crew members.

The airline, known as LAB, was privatized in 1996 and has been in and out of bankruptcy in recent years. It now runs a skeleton fleet of just two planes on a charter basis.

LAB was operating the Boeing 727 as a charter for Transporte Aereo Militar, another small Bolivian airline. TAM has chartered LAB flights to carry overflow passengers during a heavy Bolivian rainy season that has washed out roads throughout the country.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2008, 04:55 PM   #8
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,926
Likes (Received): 18194

Bolivian state airline set for takeoff next year

LA PAZ, Dec 5 (Reuters) - Bolivia will launch a new state airline in January, filling a gap left by last year's collapse of its privatized flag carrier as President Evo Morales steps up his control of the economy.

The leftist Morales has nationalized energy and mining firms since becoming Bolivia's first Indian president in 2006, and his government also plans state-run cement and paper companies.

The nascent airline, called Boliviana de Aviacion, or BoA, will take delivery of its first two aircraft by the end of 2008, General Manager Ronald Casso told Reuters on Friday, adding that another three would soon be leased.

"The aim is to build a serious airline ... that's the starting point of BoA," Casso told Reuters in a phone interview.

He said BoA would initially only cover domestic routes in the poor South American country, but the company is already considering international flights in the medium term.

Morales announced the plan to create a new state-run carrier just over a year ago and pledged to invest some $15 million to get it up and running.

BoA will fill a void left by the collapse of Lloyd Aereo Boliviano, the former state-run airline that was privatized in the late 1990s.

Lloyd was forced to suspend operations in early 2007 due to serious financial difficulties and Bolivia's transport regulator barred the airline from flying again after hundreds of passengers were stranded by canceled flights.

Casso said it was better for the state to start anew than try to rescue Lloyd.

"Very soon it became clear that a big state investment couldn't be justified to renationalize an airline laden with debts and obsolete aircraft. It didn't make sense," he said.

BoA's chief competitor will be Aerosur, which has 16 aircraft and flies within Bolivia as well as to Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Peru, Paraguay, Peru, Spain and United States. Aerosur is a private company headquartered in the eastern city of Santa Cruz.

In neighboring Argentina this week, the lower house of Congress backed a government bill to seize the country's biggest airline, Aerolineas Argentinas, from its Spanish owners.

Morales' main regional ally, Venezuela's fiery left-wing leader Hugo Chavez, also launched a state-run airline in 2004, Conviasa, which flies to Iran and Syria.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2014, 07:05 AM   #9
fieldsofdreams
PH + SF Super Moderator
 
fieldsofdreams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Manila • San Francisco
Posts: 18,819
Likes (Received): 11253

From today, I've created this thread as a result of moving some posts from another, and you can discuss things on Bolivian Aviation, which includes:

- Boliviana de Aviacion (OB)
- La Paz-El Alto International Airport (LPB)
- Santa Cruz-Viru Viru International Airport (VVI)
- Cochabamba-Jorge Wilstermann International Airport (CBB)

That way, any developments from the landlocked, mountainous country can be discussed in one, unified thread.
__________________
Anthony or FOD the MOD • Urban Studies & Planning, SF State, UC Berkeley, and San Jose State
Philippine Forums • SF Bay Area Forums • Bay Area Transit • NEW! SF Bay Area and NorCal in Pictures
Photo Albums: Flickr • Photobucket • Instagram

Rohnert Park • Rio Vista • Richmond • Redwood City • Portola Valley • Pleasanton • Pleasant Hill
fieldsofdreams no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2014, 08:26 AM   #10
fieldsofdreams
PH + SF Super Moderator
 
fieldsofdreams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Manila • San Francisco
Posts: 18,819
Likes (Received): 11253

Boliviana de Aviaciσn (BoA) B737-300 (reg. CP-2551)

__________________
Anthony or FOD the MOD • Urban Studies & Planning, SF State, UC Berkeley, and San Jose State
Philippine Forums • SF Bay Area Forums • Bay Area Transit • NEW! SF Bay Area and NorCal in Pictures
Photo Albums: Flickr • Photobucket • Instagram

Rohnert Park • Rio Vista • Richmond • Redwood City • Portola Valley • Pleasanton • Pleasant Hill
fieldsofdreams no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2015, 01:33 AM   #11
chilcano
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Mundo capitalista asqueroso
Posts: 1,536
Likes (Received): 734

2015 remodeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by BolivianJunior View Post
After...


before...

[IMG][/IMG]



After...


chilcano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2015, 11:38 PM   #12
alejandro DS
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Asuncion
Posts: 3,600
Likes (Received): 618

WOW!!!
alejandro DS no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium