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Old February 23rd, 2015, 04:08 AM   #1
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TAICHUNG | Public Transport

Taizhong Metro is a metro system under construction in the city of Taizhong, Taiwan, China.

The Wuri — Wenxin — Beitun Line (Green Line) is currently being constructed as an elevated railway with driverless electric trains. It will be about 16.5 km long with 18 stations. It will stretch from Beitun station in the northeast to the High Speed Rail Station at Xinwuri station in the southeast.




More info:

http://tcrt.taizhong.gov.tw/eng/content/index.aspx?Parser=1,12,43

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taizhong_Metro
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:38 AM   #2
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Thanks for this. Any chance of adjusting the spelling to 'Taichung', which is the standard English one? The pages at both links you've posted show 'Taichung' when you click on them, and that's how the city's name is spelled on the metro map as well.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:53 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinglush View Post
Thanks for this. Any chance of adjusting the spelling to 'Taichung', which is the standard English one? The pages at both links you've posted show 'Taichung' when you click on them, and that's how the city's name is spelled on the metro map as well.
But pinyin is the standard and the most correct romanization form of mandarin, moreover it's actually the standard in Taiwan although some cities still use the old system. The Chinese pronunciation is much closer to Taizhong than Taichung.

If there's anyone more that want to change the name we can do it...

Last edited by VECTROTALENZIS; February 23rd, 2015 at 05:58 AM.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 09:39 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VECTROTALENZIS View Post
But pinyin is the standard and the most correct romanization form of mandarin, moreover it's actually the standard in Taiwan although some cities still use the old system. The Chinese pronunciation is much closer to Taizhong than Taichung.

If there's anyone more that want to change the name we can do it...
Agree on the use of standard pinyin. If it's the official standard in Taiwan then use that unless the Taiwanese object. HK and Macau should follow suit in time.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 03:41 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
HK and Macau should follow suit in time.
Why should they use a romanization form of Mandarin when they speak Cantonese?
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:09 PM   #6
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correct writing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
Why should they use a romanization form of Mandarin when they speak Cantonese?
when the official website translation in Englsih is using Taichung, why any other will write it then diffrend???

you should use the official writing and nothing else!

so other people can locate it better.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metro-world View Post
when the official website translation in Englsih is using Taichung, why any other will write it then diffrend???

you should use the official writing and nothing else!

so other people can locate it better.
I think you are responding to the wrong post.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:13 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
Agree on the use of standard pinyin. If it's the official standard in Taiwan then use that unless the Taiwanese object. HK and Macau should follow suit in time.
For the purposes of this site, isn't it the international English standard rather than the Taiwanese standard that matters?
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 06:10 PM   #9
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For the purposes of this site, isn't it the international English standard rather than the Taiwanese standard that matters?
Lets clarify something Taizhong or TaiChung whichever one you prefer is not International Standard English they are place names of a city . In fact it's a Chinese name simply the the transliteration characters for the place 台中 Unless you were familiar with the city the words taizhong or taichung woudn't have any meaning for most people.

Due to the current political climate in Taiwan using standard pinyin might ruffle some feathers but if it is now in standrd usage across Taiwan then so be it. It's largely a dead issue any Chinese person who can read the Chinese characters will know what place is being referred to.

We should respect the local translieration the question remains is it standard pinyin or Wade Giles? Pinyin is by far the most commn method of transliteration for Chinese characters by far. Butthe Wade Giles system has been around for years and still commonly used in the west for that reason.

What exactly has International Standard English have to do with the translieration of Chinese characters into latin characters?

My final word on the subject would be to defer to the locals.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 06:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
What exactly has International Standard English have to do with the translieration of Chinese characters into latin characters?
I don't mean to say that there is a prescribed or codified standard for place names, which there isn't. It has more to do with custom and common usage by English-speaking people around the world, and this is wholly separate from what the locals think or what the political implications are. As an example, while the Chinese capital is referred to as Beijing in English, just about every other European language uses some variation of Pekin.

With Taichung/Taizhong, my sense of looking at the city website was that Taichung is the local preference (http://eng.taichung.gov.tw/)
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 07:00 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
Why should they use a romanization form of Mandarin when they speak Cantonese?
Just to clear something up Standard Pinyin is not a romanization form of Mandarin it is a romanization of the written Chinese script AKA Chinese characters which have existed for thousands of years. Mandarin and Cantonese are simply spoken dialects of Chinese of which there are many.

I would also point out that the majority of Cantonese speakers live in the Mainland province of Guangdong and Guangxi where the also use standard pinyin for the transliteratin of Chinese characters to a romanized form.

The written langauge is standard taking into account the fact that Macau, HK and Taiwan still use traditinal characters. The new simplified characters comprise a minority of the chinese characters in use.

Changing the system of romanization of Chinese characters would have no effect on the spoken language at all. To sum up you speak Cantonese you don't write it . It is not a completely separate written script but more or less the same script used on the Mainlland.

Native speakers learn their mother language at home then the charcters at school along with the pinyin to help them absorb new words along with the tone markers. Of course it's 普通话

My point being the real advantage of everyone using the same romanization system is it avoids confusion by giving us one spelling for place names or peoples names . At least in the minds of non native speakers who can't read Chinese. So Peking is actually Beijing Guangzhou is Canton and Taizhong and Taichung are the same place. In fact that city is represented by the same chinese characters on both the Mainland and Taiwan the transliteration is different.

To sum up if the Cantonese speakers on the Mainland can use standard pinyin then theire is no reason their counterparts in HK and Macau can't. Standard pinyin is recent , Mandarin dates back around 1000 years Cantonese is older but Chinese characters are among the earliest forms of writing they are pictographs bascially an improved version of what was used in Egypt.

The problem is mainly to do with the confustion having two different systems of transliteration between the Mainland and everywhere else. More precisely the confusion it causes foreigners.

The average Mainlander has no problem reading signs, menus or directions in HK written in Chinese. Understanding the local Chinese is a different matter.
There are dozens of dialects in use on the Mainland they are not written down . If there is a different script then it is a different language .

It is a common misconception that Canonese is a written language or even Mandarin . All they did was to adopt Mandarin pronouciation for existing Chinese characters . Even the tranlation of the word in Chinese for Mandarin 普通话 just means common speech or standard dialect .

Back to your point it would kill anyone in HK to adopt standard pinyin the problem is more political than linguistic Using it doesn't preclude anyone from still using their mother language.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 07:55 PM   #12
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My point is that using the same transliteration standard for Cantonese and Mandarin does not create the same transliterations.

Transliterating Shenzhen from Cantonese would give you a different word, because the name is pronounced differently. Pinyin is all about transliterating pronunciation. Cantonese has different tones than Mandarin and different pronunciations. I don't know how to write Pinyin, but Shenzhen would be more like Shamchan if transliterated from Cantonese. Beijing would not be Beijing if transliterated from Cantonese.

Anyway, there is already this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantonese_Pinyin


Oh, and no matter what they'd like you to believe, Cantonese and Mandarin are two different languages, not dialects. They might (sorta) share the same script, but so does Japanese in some instances, and that is clearly a different language.
Languages in Europe share the same script, and often the same words, but they are still not dialects of each other.
Norwegian and Danish are clearly different languages, and those are more similar than Mandarin and Cantonese.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 08:14 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunming tiger View Post
Just to clear something up Standard Pinyin is not a romanization form of Mandarin it is a romanization of the written Chinese script AKA Chinese characters which have existed for thousands of years.
Pinyin is simply a transliteration of Mandarin. Nothing more, nothing less.

You can't say that pinyin is a transliteration of Chinese characters because there are many ways to read Chinese characters - Mandarin is one of them and pinyin is a transliteration system designed for that only.

Of course they use Mandarin transliteration in Guangdong and Guangxi. It's the transliteration of the standard putonghua language that practically everybody speaks. HK is a different story - not everybody is proficient in Mandarin and hence not proficient in pinyin; imagine asking for directions to jian sha ju rather than Tsim Sha Tsui.
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Old February 24th, 2015, 02:55 AM   #14
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Can we just get back to the metro in Taichung? Nobody had any problems with Taipei, so why start?
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Old February 24th, 2015, 07:06 AM   #15
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There are two separate issues here. The standard international spelling is Taichung, as we have seen from various local government websites, Wikipedia, etc. If this were a word and not a place name, then yes, Pinyin would be the appropriate way to transliterate it. But that's not what we're talking about. This is a city with an official English spelling. Even if that spelling isn't the best representation of its pronunciation in the original Mandarin, that doesn't matter. (As mentioned above, no one is suggesting we spell Taipei as Taibei or Kaohsiung as Gaoxiong.) There's a spelling that most readers would recognize, and it's the one that city's government uses, so...
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Old February 25th, 2015, 06:07 AM   #16
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Maybe there're many "complicated problems" on transliterations of place names in Taiwan,

but which of County / (Provincial) City / Special Municipality names remaining as commonly used (Wade-Giles) ones is still a consistent principle.


Another controversial description in original post : According to current political status, Taiwan doesn't belong to China.

Personal opinion or standpoint shouldn't be superior to basic facts !!
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Old February 26th, 2015, 12:42 AM   #17
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Oh Taichung is getting a MRT

And I agree, Taiwan is not a part of mainland china!
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Old February 26th, 2015, 12:57 AM   #18
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Quote:
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(Wade-Giles) ones is still a consistent principle.
not since 2009 in Taiwan
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Old February 26th, 2015, 01:56 AM   #19
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Was the bit about Taiwan belonging to China in the original post? I see that it was edited. Beijing may not like Taiwan's independence, but that doesn't change the facts on the ground. Taiwan makes its own laws, prints its own money, has its own military, has its own sense of nationhood, and enjoys at least some diplomatic recognition (legal and implicit, depending on how various countries' embassy-like "cultural centers" or whatever they're called are to be seen). Please edit.
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Old February 26th, 2015, 02:53 AM   #20
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"China" ≠ PRC/Beijing. Even Taiwan refers to itself as "Republic of China."
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