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Old November 18th, 2010, 05:59 PM   #141
hkskyline
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YVR welcomes Canada's only daily flight to Japan's Haneda Airport
Press Release
August 17, 2010

Richmond, BC (August 17, 2010) Vancouver Airport Authority is pleased to welcome Air Canada’s new daily non-stop air service between Vancouver International Airport (YVR) and Haneda Airport. Starting in January 2011, YVR will enjoy the first and only connection between Canada and Haneda, which is only 30 minutes from downtown Tokyo. The new service complements Air Canada’s existing route between YVR and Narita, doubling the number of Air Canada’s daily flights from YVR to Japan. Not only does the new route provide increased business opportunities and economic growth, it also solidifies British Columbia as a destination of choice for trade and tourism.

“I congratulate Air Canada for expanding its service options between YVR and the Asia-Pacific region. New and increased air services are good for the people and businesses of British Columbia,” said Larry Berg, President and Chief Executive Officer, Vancouver Airport Authority. “This new Vancouver – Tokyo Haneda service will not only strengthen trade and tourism ties between these two regions, but also continue to develop YVR as a key Asia-Pacific gateway.”

A 2005 economic impact study determined that every new wide-body daily international service to YVR generates between 102 and 190 person-years of employment, between $5 million and $8.9 million in wages, and between $8 million and $15 million to British Columbia’s GDP annually. With more than 26,000 people who work on Sea Island, Vancouver International Airport is one of British Columbia’s key economic and employment generators.

“The success of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games showcased British Columbia as a prime destination for tourism and world events,” said Berg. “YVR is North America’s closest major airport to Asia—our prime location and connectivity to the Asia-Pacific region will be one of the many benefits we will be promoting at this year’s Routes 2010 forum in September.”

Vancouver Airport Authority is proud to host the 2010 World Route Development Forum, the largest global meeting place for airports and airlines. Vancouver is the first city in the Americas to host this event, which brings together international air carriers, airports and tourism authorities to map out future air services around the globe.
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Old November 29th, 2010, 06:46 PM   #142
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Stubborn coyote delays flights at YVR
Planes had to wait until it was chased off runway

Vancouver Sun
24 November 2010

Coyote, this is Vancouver air-traffic control.

You are requested to take off immediately from the south runway.

Wishful thinking, as it turned out.

The wily urban predator had no immediate interest in leaving the western end of the runway, forcing the delay of three aircraft departures until airport staff could chase the animal away.

The fur started to fly last Sunday at 7 a.m., according to a Transport Canada preliminary report on the incident.

"Several reports of coyote vicinity of the threshold of Runway 08R," the report tersely said.

"Three departures delayed less than five minutes" while a Vancouver Airport Authority vehicle "chased coyote southbound toward [Fraser] river," the report added.

YVR officials could provide no further details Tuesday about the incident.

Vancouver is not the only urban airport in North America to encounter coyotes.

Ohio's Dayton International Airport was forced to erect a perimeter fence to keep coyotes out. An airport employee was hurt chasing a coyote from a runway on April 22 when his airport vehicle overturned on wet grass.

Two runways at Boston's Logan International Airport were temporarily closed in May 2009 due to the presence of a coyote. The animal died after being struck by a truck as workers tried to corral it.

However, bird strikes are a much bigger safety issue than coyotes at Vancouver airport.

In 2009, YVR's wildlife management staff shot 327 birds while another 336 birds were killed in 146 bird strikes -- collisions -- with aircraft.

Staff scared away an estimated 816,000 birds using a variety of harassment techniques, including pyrotechnics, sirens, lights, propane cannons and trained border collies.
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Old December 10th, 2010, 06:20 AM   #143
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Looks like YVR will be getting a boost from the Asian market yet again. Words from Airline Route:

Quote:
As per 09DEC10 GDS timetable display, Philippine Airlines is to introduce 370-seater Boeing 777-300ER aircraft on Trans-Pacific service in Summer 2011.
From 27MAR11, Boeing 777-300ER aircraft replaces 264-seater Airbus A340-300 on Manila – Vancouver PR116/117 service, 3 times a week. The remaining 4 weekly service, PR106/107, with onward service to Las Vegas, remains A340 service. With the aircraft change, Vancouver gets additional 318 seats per week per direction.
Summer 2011 Schedule for PR116/117:

PR116 MNL1920 – 1600YVR 77W 135
PR117 YVR2340 – 0350+2MNL 77W 135
(Airline Route, 2010)
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Old December 17th, 2010, 06:40 AM   #144
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I'm sure CZ is going to fly to YVR very soon now, especially since Transport Canada approved slots for CZ.

Quote:
China Southern Cargo, according to the carrier, is to start new service to Vancouver and Milan Malpensa starting 27MAR11, at the launch of Summer season.
The Skyteam Cargo member, subject to government approval, is to operate:

Shanghai Pu Dong – Los Angeles – Vancouver – Shanghai Pu Dong
Guangzhou – Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa – Guangzhou
Frequencies unspecified at this moment, while operating aircraft is to be either Boeing 747-400F or 777-200F.
(Airline Route, 2010)
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Old December 25th, 2010, 04:52 PM   #145
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Old December 25th, 2010, 06:59 PM   #146
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the KLM windows looks really nice
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Old January 21st, 2011, 11:19 AM   #147
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Float plane operators walk away from unfinished terminal
Dispute over trip levy leads to proposal to build second facility
18 January 2011
The Globe and Mail

VANCOUVER -- A long-running dispute between float plane operators and the developers of a new terminal has veered into even choppier waters, with the operators saying they want to build their own facility.

The two groups have been at loggerheads for months over a levy that would be added to fares at the $22-million facility, nearing completion at the north end of the new Vancouver Convention Centre.

“The economy of it just doesn't work for us,” Greg McDougall, chief executive officer of Harbour Air and president of the eight-member Vancouver Commercial Seaplane Operators' Association, said Monday.

“And it's a blank cheque for the developer, because they can charge whatever they like, in perpetuity.”

The developers – Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, a joint venture between the Clarke Group and Ledcor – say a $12 one-way trip fee is needed to generate a reasonable rate of return for the private-sector partners in a modern, user-friendly terminal.

Float planes, which ferry business people, tourists and other passengers between downtown Vancouver and Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands and other destinations, are a fixture on the harbour scene but are without a permanent home.

Harbour Air moved its previous facility to make way for construction of the convention centre and is currently operating from a base in Coal Harbour, where some nearby residents have complained of noise.

That makeshift solution was supposed to be resolved with the construction of a new float plane facility, which was planned as part of the new convention centre. VHVC struck a deal with B.C. Pavilion Corp., the provincial Crown corporation that runs the convention centre, to build and operate the terminal.

At the time the facility was announced, in September, 2010, VHFC was counting on Harbour Air as its main tenant.

But fees soon became an issue. After months of negotiations, the float plane operators this week said they haven't been able to reach an agreement with VHFC in relation to fees and want to run their own, non-profit facility on a Port-Metro-Vancouver-owned site east of the convention centre.

That leaves VHFC putting the final touches on a facility that, at this point, has no anchor tenant.

The operators' proposal for a would-be rival terminal has “zero” impact on VHFC's plans, VHFC chairman Graham Clarke said Monday. The facility is expected to be complete in May, he said.

“We are quite far down the road, we have built all the floats, we are in the process of building the commercial retail unit in the northwest corner of the building, we are doing the elevators – we have invested a lot of money in the building and we are just going to keep going,” Mr. Clarke said.

Sites east of the convention centre have been considered – and ruled out – before, based on issues including marine navigation routes.

Under its lease with the city, Harbour Air was to move from its existing site some time in 2012, when a two-year term expires, or when a new, permanent facility is built – whichever came first.

Once a new facility operating, Harbour Air's lease would no longer be in effect, a city spokeswoman said Monday, adding that the company could apply for a new lease for a new site at any time.

Harbour Air, the biggest float plane operator, has taken the lead in negotiations on the new terminal. But smaller operators are also weighing in, saying the potential levy would drive away passengers and business.

“Twenty-four dollars is just too much,” Philip Reece, marketing director for Saltspring Air. “And you could justify $24, if it was going to be $24 for something – but we still don't have access to the other public transport, it's not going to be the facility we want.”

Port Metro Vancouver representatives were not immediately available for comment.
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Old January 21st, 2011, 06:40 PM   #148
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By Gordon Tan from HKADB :





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Old January 26th, 2011, 08:00 PM   #149
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Seaplane decision still months away
Proposed $24 levy at new terminal in Vancouver sparks controversy

26 January 2011
Victoria Times Colonist

It's going to take months to decide whether seaplane operators can build a new terminal and relocate the Vancouver Harbour airport to the east side of Canada Place, says a Port Metro Vancouver official.

Seaplane companies are angry with a $24 round-trip-per-passenger levy planned by a private developer of a new terminal at the north end of the Vancouver Convention Centre. These businesses include Harbour Air, which operates in Victoria Harbour. About 350,000 passengers use the Vancouver seaplane airport annually.

The companies want to build their own not-for-profit terminal to the east of Canada Place, leasing land from the port for commercial space. They are also suggesting moving the existing airport to that side, said Philip Reece, a director at Salt Spring Air.

Port Metro Vancouver agreed in a Monday meeting with operators to outline in a letter what's needed for a detailed application for a float plane terminal.

The total size of the operators' terminal has not been determined, Reece said. It would link up with walkway to the SeaBus.

To avoid passing on extra costs to passengers, the operators' commercial space on land would include a coffee shop, bicycle rentals and possibly other activities, Reece said.

Seaplanes would be able to navigate there, as they are used to working out of busy harbours, he said.

Duncan Wilson, port spokesman, said Tuesday: "It's going to take months to do a proper evaluation."

"For any development on port land, we do an environmental assessment, and in this case, it's just not on the land, it is on the operations, too," said Wilson. This includes examining impact of float planes as they taxi on the water, emissions, noise, safety in navigation, plus community consultations.

As for the airport proposal, Wilson said: "Relocating one of B.C.'s busiest airports is going to require a complete assessment of safety, environmental and community impacts."

The current airport on the west side of Canada Place is seen by the port as the "optimal" site, but the operators' proposal would be considered, he said.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 05:05 PM   #150
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Maple Fun Tours delays Japan plans
29 January 2011
The Globe and Mail

Maple Fun Tours has postponed plans to introduce Canadian holiday packages for Japanese visitors. The Vancouver-based tour operator said last fall that it wanted to start flights in June, but it has decided to delay the launch until May or June of 2012. Jacques Kavafian, chief executive officer of parent Maple Fun Travel, said Friday that there were snags in hiring aircraft in a timely fashion for routes planned from Osaka and Nagoya to Vancouver. Mr. Kavafian said he could have scrambled to get vacation tours in place this August or September, but it's best to open at the start of the summer travel season in 2012. WestJet Airlines Ltd. co-founder Mark Hill and former Air Canada chief financial officer Robert Peterson are part of the venture to tap the market for Japanese tourists.
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Old January 30th, 2011, 12:29 AM   #151
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I was wondering why it took so long...
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Old February 19th, 2011, 07:06 PM   #152
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Crisis looms for world's biggest float-plane industry
Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre at odds with seaplane operators association's vision for not-for-profit Harbour Hub
Special to the Vancouver Sun
17 February 2011
Vancouver Sun

Part of what makes Vancouver unique is we host the province's fourth busiest airport in the heart of downtown. It's the float-plane terminal in Vancouver harbour, anchoring the world's largest fleet of seaplanes.

This vital link, which transports 350,000 people in and out of downtown every year, has always been run by the float-plane industry itself at minimal cost to passengers. It is about to be crippled, however, and some seaplane operators may be shut out of the harbour altogether.

We are facing a crisis brought on by a private consortium, known as the Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, which has been given permission by the provincial government to build a $22-million float-plane terminal on the north end of the new Vancouver Convention Centre.

To pay for their investment and future profits -for a terminal the float-plane industry believes is also poorly designed and too expensive -the developers want to tack on a minimum fee of $24 for every passenger flying in and out of Vancouver harbour.

No other major Canadian airport operates under such a structure in which a private developer can set airport fees that amount to $4 million to $5 million annually -fees that they can raise at will in the future. As an industry whose viability rests upon offering affordable air-transport options to the public, we cannot agree to this exorbitant airport fee. It is also not in the public interest for government to hand such authority to a forprofit developer that has effectively been handed a monopoly in the harbour.

We in the float-plane industry also have grave misgivings about the design and location of the $22-million terminal being built by the private developers behind Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre.

The views of our industry -builders and operators of seaplane passenger terminals for generations -were ignored in the design of the proposed facility. We have warned the Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre that given the inflated costs and serious flaws no float plane operator would sign up as a tenant.

None have. Aside from inflated construction costs, the deficiencies of the proposed terminal include: No direct connection from the terminal to public transit, and the Canada Line to Vancouver International Airport; no viable passenger pickup or drop-off area; lack of affordable parking; exposure to heavy winds and high waves; and a design that adds hundreds of metres of walking distance for those who need to use the terminal.

The Vancouver Commercial Seaplane Operators Association, which represents the eight seaplane companies that want a functional terminal, has a better and cheaper solution for the industry and the public: The Harbour Hub.

The association is applying to Port Metro Vancouver to build this not-for-profit passenger terminal east of Canada Place, at about half the cost.

The Harbour Hub will link the float-plane terminal, effectively British Columbia's fourth largest airport, to the Canada Line, SkyTrain, the West Coast Express and other forms of public transit.

It also is a multi-modal hub, fitting in with Vancouver's future transportation needs. It would enable the inclusion of Helijet in the terminal, providing shared services such as check-ins and baggage handling, and future passenger ferries operating out of the downtown.

More importantly, the Harbour Hub would be constructed at half the cost. That eliminates the need for a $24 fee for passengers who wish to fly in and out of the terminal. Our intention is to invest savings and revenues into the terminal, to push costs down and keep ticket prices affordable.

There is an important piece of national public policy at stake here. The creep upwards in airport rents, which are being passed onto the public, means air travellers are going south of the border. One need only visit Bellingham's airport to see the worrying trend of British Columbians bypassing our airports.

Air Canada CEO Calin Rovinescu warned of this crisis in a recent speech to Toronto's Canadian Cub: "We increasingly see Canadians driving across the border to Buffalo, to Plattsburgh, to Seattle to get on flights because they are cheaper."

At the moment, Vancouver's float plane operators use a temporary terminal in Coal Harbour whose permit is running out. We need to find a new location and are committed to doing so, fulfilling our promise to the City of Vancouver and Coal Harbour residents.

We believe the Harbour Hub is in the public interest. Our aircraft will take off and land further out from shore, reducing noise for residents. We will connect passengers to public transit and we will work with Transport Canada to ensure safety.

We could re-locate our existing docks east of Canada Place in a matter of weeks, all at no cost to the taxpayer or public. We can also continue to operate while we build the Harbour Hub.

This is the seaplane terminal that Vancouver -and its float plane industry -needs for the future.

Greg McDougall is the president of the Vancouver Commercial Seaplane Operators. Philip Reece is director of Salt Spring Air.
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Old April 6th, 2011, 01:07 AM   #153
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Quote:

YVR named best airport in North America; Fairmont Vancouver also tops category

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/n...#ixzz1IgmXk2jW

VANCOUVER - The Vancouver Airport and the Fairmont Vancouver Airport were recognized Wednesday at the 2011 World Airport Awards held in Copenhagen.

YVR was named best airport in North America, while the Fairmont Vancouver was awarded the Best Airport Hotel in North America. The Fairmont Vancouver was also named fifth-best airport hotel in the world.

The awards are determined by Skytrax, which collected responses from more than 11 million questionnaires distributed to passengers around the world, representing more than 100 nationalities and covering more than 240 airports worldwide. Airline travelers voted for the world’s best airports, best airport hotels, best staff service, best shopping and in other categories.

“We are honoured to accept such an esteemed award,” Craig Reaume, general manager of the Fairmont Vancouver said in a news release. “This speaks volumes about the levels of service and guest experience we provide.”

Reaume said the hotel offered an “unrivaled location” located above the U.S. departures level, and “authentically local British Columbia experiences “ in its restaurant and bar.

Travelers voted the Hong Kong International as the world's best airport and the Regal Airport Hotel in Hong Kong as the top hotel.

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Su


Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/n...#ixzz1IgmFZJoT
(Vancouver Sun, 2011)
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Old April 18th, 2011, 12:01 PM   #154
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Quote:
YVR Announces Canada's First Aircraft Engine-Testing Enclosure
April 12, 2011



State-of-the-art facility to reduce aircraft noise in the community

Richmond, B.C. (April 12, 2011): Vancouver Airport Authority today announced details of Canada’s first Ground Run-up Enclosure (GRE), a state-of-the-art facility designed to minimize noise from engine run-ups that are conducted as part of regular aircraft maintenance work.

The $12-million facility, to be located adjacent to YVR’s South Terminal, will reduce the engine run-up noise heard in nearby neighbourhoods by up to 50 per cent, while providing time and fuel efficiencies to air carriers operating out of Airport South and overall environmental benefits to the entire region.

“We are incredibly pleased to embark on such a leading-edge project that not only demonstrates a commitment to our neighbours, but also to our operators and our natural environment,” said Anne Murray, Vice President, Community and Environmental Affairs, Vancouver Airport Authority. “Vancouver Airport Authority is committed to managing airport noise, balancing the community’s desire for safe, convenient, 24-hour air travel with urban living,”

The GRE is a three-sided, open-roofed enclosure, as tall as a five-storey building and built with noise-absorbing panels and perforated by several louvered vents for aerodynamic purposes. The GRE is designed to reduce engine run-up noise by absorbing and channelling sound up rather than out.

In addition to noise abatement, the GRE will provide a glycol recovery and containment area during winter de-icing operations. The GRE will also provide fuel and time efficiencies and reduce greenhouse gas emissions for Airport South operators who no longer need to taxi to the designated run-up area at the west end of Sea Island.

“We have been studying the social, economic and environmental benefits of a GRE for the past three years as part of our comprehensive Noise Management Plan,” Murray said. “YVR’s engine-testing enclosure will be one of the largest construction projects undertaken on the airport’s South side in recent years and will offer our community significant benefits for years to come.”

YVR’s Noise Management Program focuses on initiatives that address aircraft noise in the community, including published noise abatement procedures, community noise information seminars, an airport noise monitoring and flight tracking system and a complaint management and response system.

Engine run-ups are mandatory by Transport Canada as part of stringent maintenance and safety standards that require operators to test engines and their components before an aircraft is put back into service. More than seven per cent of noise complaints received by YVR are related to engine run-ups.
Construction of the Ground Run-up Enclosure and adjoining apron will begin in April 2011 and is slated for completion in December 2011.

About Vancouver Airport Authority
Vancouver Airport Authority is a community-based, not-for-profit organization that operates Vancouver International Airport (YVR). Canada's second busiest airport, YVR served 16.8 million passengers in 2010 and handled more than 293,000 aircraft landings and take-offs on its runways. Sixty-seven airlines serve YVR, connecting people and businesses to 119 destinations in Canada, the U.S. and around the world. The Airport Authority is committed to creating an airport that British Columbia can be proud of: a premier global gateway, local economic generator and community contributor.

-YVR-

For further information:
YVR Media Relations
604.880.9815 ; [email protected]
www.yvr.ca Twitter: @yvrairport
(YVR, 2011)

Additional Images + Videos: http://yvr.brollarchive.com/
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Old April 18th, 2011, 06:04 PM   #155
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Old April 19th, 2011, 04:48 AM   #156
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Great photos!!!!! loving the ANZ boeing 777.
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Old May 22nd, 2011, 11:04 AM   #157
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Not specifically YVR but the other airport in Vancouver :

A bumpy flight
Some float-plane operators insist Vancouver's new terminal amounts to a monopoly that will add hefty passenger fees to each flight

21 May 2011
The Globe and Mail

VANCOUVER -- With their ability to touch down nearly anywhere with water, float planes have long been the taxis of the hinterland.

In British Columbia, the aircraft are also an increasingly popular option for commuters. Politicos flying back and forth between Victoria and the mainland account for much of the traffic, but seaplanes also cater to small business owners, contractors and tourists, with 350,000 to 400,000 passengers flying in and out of Vancouver Harbour every year.

Evidence of that shift, and the millions of dollars in business it represents, can be seen floating on Vancouver Harbour, where workers are putting the finishing touches on a new float-plane terminal scheduled to open May 25 to replace a temporary facility a few minutes' walk to the west.

The high stakes are also evident in a bitter standoff between the developers of the new terminal and prospective tenants, including Vancouver-based Harbour Air, the biggest float-plane operator in the province and the company that operates the existing facility. In January, float-plane operators publicly balked over what they called a passenger levy of $12 per flight in and out of the harbour via the new facility.

Based on the rent Harbour Air pays for its current space, the cost per trip works out to about $2, says Harbour Air CEO Greg McDougall. At Seair's Richmond float-plane base, companies pay about $3 per trip.

Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, the developer of the new terminal, says the cost is not a passenger levy but rent – and that it reflects the price of building to the latest safety and performance standards. As the clock ticks down to the opening, the two sides remain at loggerheads, even though VHFC has reduced the charges enough to attract two float-plane operators, which signed on to use the new terminal at $9.50 per trip. The other operators insist that is still too high.

The province is taking heat from tourism interests worried about potentially higher ticket costs. The city, meanwhile, is under pressure to keep its promise to Coal Harbour residents to close a “temporary” float-plane facility that's been in place since 2004.

Stick-handling the file for the province is Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Pat Bell, who on Friday said he was hopeful a solution could be found.

Float planes are “significant both from a transportation perspective and from a tourism perspective,” Mr. Bell said. “It's something that is important to not just residents of B.C. but to the tourism industry – to make sure we are able to move people around efficiently.”

Float planes have been zipping in and out of Vancouver Harbour for decades, but the current impasse dates back to 2004, when Harbour Air was bumped from its site at the foot of Burrard Street to make room for the Convention Centre expansion.

The dislocation was supposed to last only a few years, until a new facility was built, but construction on the new terminal didn't start until last year.

The current situation includes questions about how the deal was put out to bid and awarded. VHFC says it won the project in a transparent process and has made changes and concessions in an attempt to please Harbour Air. But Greg McDougall, president of Harbour Air, says his company was shut out because float-plane operators were told that the winner would have to provide retail and commercial space – something his company had no expertise in – and were stunned when the float-plane portion later became a separate lease. In the legislature this month, Mr. Bell said he would consider reviewing the procurement process.

Mr. McDougall has also fiercely objected to a private developer holding what he calls a monopoly on float-plane traffic.

VHFC chairman Graham Clarke – who was the chair of the Vancouver Airport Authority for 13 years before stepping down in 2010 – says private consortiums worldwide are taking on the complex, expensive tasks of running airports. One of the leaders in the field is Vancouver Airport Services Ltd., a Vancouver Airport Authority subsidiary that runs airports in Canada, the United Kingdom and Jamaica. Float-plane bases are typically small and run as non-profits.

When the new terminal is up and running, Harbour Air will likely face pressure from the city to pull up stakes. The company's agreement with the city allows it to stay on its current site until 2012 or when a new terminal is complete, whichever comes first.

The city has not given the company notice but has asked for a decommissioning plan, said David McLellan, general manager of community services with the City of Vancouver.

Council has been clear that once the new terminal is open, it would not support an extension for Harbour Air on the current site, he said.

Mr. McDougall, who over the past two decades has built his company from a handful of aircraft to the world's biggest float-plane-only operation, insists that operators should be given a green light to build a non-profit terminal at a different location.

Others aren't counting on that possibility. At the new terminal last week, Seair president Peter Clarke said his Richmond-based company has long wanted to expand its downtown presence.

Under the terms of its deal with VHFC, Seair will not pay rent for a few months, an incentive Mr. Clarke likened to those commonly offered by commercial real-estate landlords. And he said the $9.50 per passenger rate is reasonable for the services the new terminal will provide.

“We've always wanted to be here and we have always said we are going to be there when it opens,” Mr. Clarke said.

***********

IT'S BEEN A LONG, FRUSTRATING FLIGHT

Next week, some float-plane companies will settle into Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre. Some stops along the way:

• 2004: Float-plane companies operating from a base at the foot of Burrard Street are required to move west, to the Coal Harbour site, to make room for an expanded Convention Centre. Neighbourhood residents are told the facility will be there for a maximum of three years.

• 2004: The Vancouver Convention Centre Expansion Project starts consultations for a new, permanent seaplane terminal.

• 2005: PCI Properties Corp. wins the bid to develop the float-plane terminal and related retail space.

• 2006-2010: Float-plane operators and the developer wrangle over cost and design; the early budget is $11-million.

• 2010: BC Pavilion Corporation signs a water-lot lease with Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, a joint venture between the Clarke Group of Companies and the Ledcor Group of Companies. PCI retains the commercial and retail part of the operation.

• January, 2011: Float-plane operators go public with objections to fees at the new terminal, saying the fees would add $12 to the cost of each flight in and out of the harbour. VHFC says the fees reflect its costs and a reasonable return on investment. Both sides accuse the other of being a monopoly.

• February, 2011: Float-plane operators file a complaint with the provincial ombudsman over the new terminal.

• May 6, 2011: Two float-plane operators, Seair and Tofino Air, sign up to use the new terminal, agreeing to pay a fee of $9.50 per trip.

• May 25, 2011: The official opening of VHFC.

Wendy Stueck
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 11:46 PM   #158
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Quote:
Vancouver airport turns 80
When it opened there was a single runway, now it welcomes 17 million passengers a year
Gerry Bellett, Vancouver Sun: Friday, July 22, 2011 12:08 PM



Tony Gugliotta, senior vice president for marketing and commercial development at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond poses July 20, 2011 in the Link Atrium that connects the domestic and international terminals with the Canada Line.
Photo Credit: Ric Ernst, VANCOUVER SUN
In 1927, aviation icon Charles Lindbergh turned up his nose at flying into Vancouver as part of a North American tour marking his epic New York-to-Paris flight because "there was no field fit to land on."

Their invitation rejected, the city fathers were stung into action and four years later, on July 22, 1931, the Vancouver airport was officially opened on Sea Island with a hard-surfaced runway, the first in Canada.

So there, Charles.

And today, as Vancouver International Airport celebrates its 80th birthday, it draws delegations from airports around the world to admire its public art and West Coast decoration.

"There's a growing number of airports coming to talk to us about it," says Don Ehrenholz, vice-president of operations at the Vancouver Airport Authority.

They, too, would like their airports to showcase their regions, in the same way that Vancouver is reflected in the airport's theme of forest, sea and native art - the centrepiece being Bill Reid's Jade Canoe.

"They talk to us about how they can move in that direction. It's a growing trend," says Ehrenholz.

The original airport, bought and paid for by the City of Vancouver, was located where the south terminal is today.

It might have been elsewhere; the city looked at various sites, including one on the mud flats in North Vancouver, according to airport historian Richard Cook.

"They were looking all over for sites and they did consider North Vancouver, but the area was part of an Indian reserve so they went to Richmond," says Cook, who began working at the airport in 1957 and is now retired.

He believes the two biggest events in the airport's history were moving the main terminal to its present site in 1968 and the creation of the Vancouver Airport Authority in July 1992.

"Moving the terminal to the north allowed the airport to expand. By 1968, we were completely overcrowded in the old terminal. We needed room to breathe," says Cook.

"Then creating the airport authority enabled the airport to expand faster than it would under the federal government," said Cook.

Ehrenholz says that move was necessary because the federal government didn't have the money to fund the necessary expansion of the airport.

"Transport Canada decided to move to privatization and the Vancouver Airport Authority was born - the first airport to be privatized in Canada," he says.

Since then, more than $2.5 billion worth of expansion has occurred at the airport, including a new international terminal, a new runway, development of hotel and commercial facilities and the commissioning of public art.

In 1968, the new terminal provided 700,000 square feet. Today's terminal encompasses 3.5 million square feet and will likely expand again within the next 10 years, says Ehrenholz.

"We have 17 million passengers a year now [compared to 1,072 the year the airport first opened] and we can handle up to 21 million depending on the mix of aircraft. We expect to be up to 24-to-25 million within 10 years so there will have to be some growth - about five or six more gates - but not as much as we've seen in the last 10 years," he says.

Ehrenholz says YVR wants the airport to become a transit hub for passengers coming from Europe or Asia and heading to other destinations.

"We'd like to grow that business in the next 10 years. It would bring in people and maybe during the two hours they spend getting a coffee here they would get a brief taste of the West Coast and decide to come back for a visit," he says. But all that's in the future. Today is about the past.

So happy birthday, YVR.

YVR OPEN HOUSE

Two-day celebration

In recognition of YVR's 80th anniversary, the Vancouver Airport Authority is acknowledging the past and celebrating the future with a free community open house today and Saturday.

The two-day open house celebration takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. both days, and highlights include an airside ballet at 11 a.m. daily; an 80 Memorable Moments photo gallery; a vintage aircraft display at the South Terminal; aircraft flypasts; a variety of family entertainment; and free commemorative giveaways. For detailed information and a schedule of events, visit www. yvr.ca.
(Global TV BC 2011)
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Old August 4th, 2011, 10:27 PM   #159
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Quote:
China Eastern Reducing Vancouver service in Nov/Dec 2011
As per 04AUG11 GDS timetable display, China Eastern from 31OCT11 to 11DEC11 is temporary reducing Shanghai Pu Dong – Vancouver service from Daily to 5 weekly.

Service continues to be operated by Airbus A340-300 aircraft.

Schedule:

MU581 PVG1330 – 0910YVR 343 x27
MU582 YVR1330 – 1635+1PVG 343 x27
(Airline Route 2011)
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Old November 7th, 2011, 07:40 AM   #160
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Additional interest from China
Quote:
*New China-to-Vancouver flights to bring visitors and jobs*
*
*Guangdong- China:***Representatives from China's Sichuan Airlines and the Vancouver Airport Authority have signed a letter of intent with the goal of starting a new three flights a week service to Vancouver in 2012, bringing with it a boost in tourism and new jobs, announced Premier Christy Clark.
*
The Premier met with Zhang Huiyu, Vice General Manager for Sichuan Airlines, and Tony Gugliotta, Senior Vice President Marketing and Business Development for Vancouver Airport Authority in Guangzhou, China as part of her Jobs Trade Mission.*The new service would be the company's first foray into North America.
*
"Expanding markets for B.C. products and services, particularly in Asia, is a*key*pillar of Canada Starts Here: The BC Jobs Plan," said Premier Clark. "Sichuan Airlines' plans to start this new service will provide another way for British Columbian and Chinese businesses and individuals to expand trade, and will create jobs, new personal connections and $50 million in additional tourism-related revenue annually between Canada and China."
*
Before flights can begin, Sichuan Airlines must receive approval from Transport Canada.* Just this year China Southern Airlines started flying passengers and cargo from Guangzhou to YVR.**The new Chengdu - Shenyang - YVR service would generate substantial direct economic benefits to British Columbia, including 31,000 additional visitors to BC annually, and $3.5 million to BC's GDP every year.
*
"Sichuan Airlines, along with its partners, looks forward to increasing the existing trade, business and personal ties between China and Canada by specifically helping to move passengers and cargo between Chengdu, Shenyang and Vancouver," said Zhang Huiyu of Sichuan Airlines.
*
In 2009, China granted Canada Approved Destination Status (ADS) following the visit of Prime Minister Harper to China which allowed tourism operators in both countries to market their destinations to the other country. Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, has a population of over 14 million and is a business, trade and technology centre in southwest China.* Shenyang, the capital of Liaoning Province, has a population of nine million and is an industrial hub in northeast China.* Both cities would be new and important markets for B.C.*
*
"Strengthening our infrastructure to get our goods and services to market is a key pillar of* the BC Jobs Plan and a new service*from China would do that, " said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Blair Lekstrom. "Adding additional air services from China would enrich our air connection to Asia and increase business possibilities."
*
"Under the leadership of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the federal government's investments and partnerships in building the Asia-Pacific Gateway continue to strategically position Canada as the corridor of choice between high-growth Asian markets and North America," said the Honourable Ed Fast, Canada's Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia Pacific Gateway who recently returned from a trade mission to China where he promoted Canada's competitive advantages directly to China's political and business leaders.* "We welcome further indications of private sector interest in strengthening Canada's competitive advantages by facilitating the movement of goods, services and people between Canada and China.* Deepening Canada's trading relationship with China creates jobs and prosperity for hardworking British Columbians and all Canadians."
*
"This would be an exciting development for YVR and the province," said Vancouver Airport Authority's Tony Gugliotta. "It demonstrates that B.C. is an attractive destination for Chinese tourists and a favoured partner for new business. It also highlights the importance of Vancouver International Airport as an economic generator for B.C."
*
As part of the BC Jobs Plan, Premier Christy Clark is leading the largest trade mission in the province's history to promote BC as a safe harbour for investment. The Jobs and Trade Mission is focused on strengthening existing relationships between B.C. and Asian markets, opening doors for new relationships and setting the stage for future opportunities in China and India. Delegates from more than 130 companies and organizations are accompanying the Premier as part of the effort to defend and create jobs here at home. Health Minister Mike de Jong will also be accompanying the Premier during her time in India. *
Japan and Hong Kong are also on the jobs and trade mission itinerary. Forests Minister Steve Thomson will travel to Japan and Minister Pat Bell, Jobs, Tourism and Innovation, ends his part of the mission in Hong Kong.
*Quick Facts:*
·*********Chinese visitors spend an average of $1,600 per person when they visit Canada.
·*********Sichuan Airlines operates a fleet of 62 aircraft (including 3 A330-200)*from its main hub in Chengdu.* It has an extensive domestic network and began operating internationally in 2007.* It now operates routes to Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Indonesia, Maldives, Vietnam and the island of Saipan.* This service will be Sichuan's first route to North America.*
·*********The BC Jobs Plan commits the Province to aggressively seek out partnerships with aviation companies to increase flights to the province.
**
(Government of British Columbia 2011)
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