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Old April 8th, 2015, 06:19 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vertical_Gotham View Post
where's the Baccarat? I don't see it.
this one:




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Old April 8th, 2015, 06:33 AM   #22
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In city realty's picture where you have the red arrow pointing to is the Rizzoli tower because it's adjacent, right behind Solow's 9 W 57th tower. The Baccarat should be located in close proximity to Verre on 53rd Street which I'm guessing is blocked by 425 Park Avenue.

In the black and white rendering the location is wrong imo for the Baccarat. I think that tower is mislabeled. I think that tower should be Verre. I dunno.
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Old April 11th, 2015, 12:53 AM   #23
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Looks amazing and those old buildings isn't much of a loss they look quite Moldy. This new tower will be super sleek and modern and will fill in very nice indeed with the rest of Super luxury towers being built or on Proposal.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 02:10 AM   #24
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http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/05/13/realestate/commercial/a-conversation-with-joseph-p-beninati.html
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Old May 28th, 2015, 03:02 AM   #25
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Someone please arrest those NIMBYs!!

http://www.nypress.com/local-news/20...t-sutton-place

Drawing a Line At Sutton Place


BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS
MAY 26, 2015

Quote:
A proposed development by the Bauhouse Group to build a 900-foot tall residential tower in the historic Sutton Place neighborhood shocked many when it was revealed by Our Town in April. Since then, according to Community Board 6 and Councilmember Ben Kallos, residents who live in the area have joined forces in a plan to stop, or at least limit, the scope of the project.

Bauhouse began years ago to build an assemblage allowing for a 268,000-square-foot tower that would be the one of the tallest in the city and the second-tallest on the Upper East Side, behind the in-progress 1,400-foot 432 Park Avenue. The development includes 58,000 square feet of inclusionary housing rights, and consists of four building lots totaling 80 feet of frontage on East 58th Street between 1st Avenue and Sutton Place.

According to sources with knowledge of the development, Bauhouse is actually looking to unload the parcel to another developer. In response to the proposal, CB6 passed a resolution that could serve to limit how high a buyer can build on Sutton Place.

“The community expressed strong opinions that the proposed construction will ruin the scale and character of their neighborhood,” said CB6 in its resolution, referring to a meeting this month at which more than 100 people voiced their concerns about the project. The board said it invited Bauhouse to the meeting and were told that company was not yet prepared to make a presentation.

The resolution, citing Our Town’s story in April, supports rezoning mid-block areas in CB6’s territory to a lower density than the current R10 zoning allows for, which is the highest residential zoning designation in the city.

It also proposes government action such as a Department of Buildings delay upon receiving an application for approval of plans. Other government action could include a moratorium on super-high towers, according to the resolution.

The board’s position is that the long-term impact of mega-towers on surrounding neighborhoods, which they call a “recent innovation,” cannot be fairly and completely assessed since the technology that made them possible was not around in 1961 when the city’s zoning districts were created. These impacts include those on infrastructure, traffic, parking, waste removal, and fire and ambulance services, according to the board.

“Thus further investigation and study is needed, especially since this development…appears to be as of right,” said the board in its resolution.

When asked to comment on the board’s resolution, a spokesperson for the Bauhouse Group said the company “is aware of the community’s concerns, as laid out by Community Board 6’s resolution. We respect and are open to hearing the viewpoints of community members and we look forward to a productive dialogue.”

Councilmember Kallos said of the three options put forth by the community board, he believes down-zoning midblock areas is the most viable.

“I do support the community call for a moratorium, but that would be completely up to the mayor,” said Kallos. “The ultimate thing we need to look at is contextual zoning for a height cap.”

Kallos said he was struck by the speed at which the community moved to block the Sutton Place development.

“In less than 45 days, from the first publication [about the Sutton Place development], the issue went to the community board land use committee, was heard, voted on, went to the full board for a vote, passed, and has been sent to City Planning,” said Kallos.

The resolution was sent to City Planning on May 15. Kallos said his office and CB6 have already started an environmental assessment study, which would be included in their forthcoming City Planning application to down zone mid-block areas in the district.

“We’re working with the Sutton area community and we’ve already begun starting work on the EAS,” said Kallos, who has been raising awareness about the development and collecting funds from area residents to pay for the study. “Interest in this issue has been tremendous.”

Kallos said just because a development is as of right does not mean the community cannot push back against a project they’re opposed to. A zoning change by City Planning would trump a developer’s right to build as large as they want in an R10 area.

“We are redefining their rights and trying to change the law,” said Kallos.

The plan, said Kallos, is to get the zoning change through the ULURP process before a developer, whoever it may be, breaks ground on the lot.

Whoever buys the development from Bauhouse would still need to file designs with DOB. Once approved, a developer can begin excavating the base, but that can only be done in warmer months. In total, the process could take six months to a year to complete before any ground can be broken.

“We’re moving full steam ahead in a way that hasn’t happened with any of the other mega-towers we’re seeing crop up across the city,” said Kallos. “We have to draw the line when it comes to residential areas. “They’re just going to keep creeping up throughout the city.”
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Old August 18th, 2015, 09:38 PM   #26
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Skyscraper That Would Soar Over Sutton Place Runs Into Neighborhood Opposition

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By CHARLES V. BAGLIAUG. 18, 2015
Herndon Werth met with several lawyers last week in a restaurant around the corner from his home of over 40 years on a sleepy stretch of 58th Street, near luxurious Sutton Place on the East Side of Manhattan.

They offered to give him an apartment rent-free for life, moving expenses and, by one account, $1 million, if only he would vacate his rent-regulated studio on the top floor of a six-story brownstone.

A developer has already bought three other small adjoining buildings on the block and plans to demolish them to erect New York City’s latest opulent super tower: It would soar more than 900 feet — some 80 stories — above the street in what the developer calls “Manhattan’s quintessential luxury neighborhood.”

But Mr. Werth, 81, a lifelong bachelor whose longtime neighbors refer to him as the Sage of 58th Street, said his response was blunt: “I told them,” he said, “‘I ain’t going nowhere.’”

Mr. Werth is only one obstacle in the quest by the developer, Joseph P. Beninati, to build the deluxe skyscraper. Opposition to his project has spread among the well-heeled in the Sutton Place area in a sign that at least some New Yorkers are exhausted by the relentless pace of construction that has transformed one neighborhood after another.

Slim, super-tall towers are fueling an extraordinary building boom, particularly along a Midtown stretch of 57th Street known as Billionaire’s Row, where at least eight skyscrapers are underway with apartments selling for tens of millions of dollars, primarily to foreign investors.

The lure of oversized profits is unmistakable. Builders are now planning residential skyscrapers as tall as the Empire State Building in areas once unthinkable: Downtown Brooklyn; Long Island City, Queens; and on a parcel next to the South Street Seaport in downtown Manhattan.

“This is the first time that a billionaire’s tower is going up in a residential neighborhood,” Mr. Beninati said. “New York has always been a city that reaches for the sky to express the aspirations of the people who live and work here.”

But residents of 16 co-op and condominium buildings near Mr. Beninati’s site have formed an alliance to try to stop the project, hiring lawyers and political strategists, and enlisting civic groups and elected officials, including City Councilman Benjamin Kallos, who represents the area, and the Manhattan borough president, Gale A. Brewer.

“This is about preserving our residential neighborhoods and the light and air for the people who live there,” Mr. Kallos said. “The community is finally fighting back against superscrapers.”

In a sense, the battle pits the “haves” of Sutton Place who want to preserve the genteel qualities of their neighborhood against the international 1 percent from Russia, the Middle East and Latin America who would be the likely buyers of condos in the tower, even if they, like many foreign buyers, lived in them just a few weeks of the year.

“It’s like sticking a Freedom Tower in a residential area,” said Lisa Mercurio, a local resident and member of the East River 50s Alliance, the group opposing the development. “This building is an investment bank for overseas oligarchs. It’s not meant to house real people in the neighborhood. What happens to the environment when the skyline is so cluttered up that the sun can’t shine down to the ground.”

Some of the fiercest critics live at the Sovereign, a 47-story co-op, directly across 58th Street from Mr. Beninati’s proposed construction site. Built in 1975, it was the ultraluxury building of its era.

The architecture critic Paul Goldberger, writing in The New York Times at the time, described the building as “brutally destructive of the scale of 58th Street and Sutton Place.”

Mr. Beninati’s tower, opponents say, would loom 400 feet over the Sovereign. “I don’t think you can compare a 900-foot needle tower with the Sovereign,” said Gail Haft, a member of Sutton Area Community, a local organization.

The alliance is hoping to enlist the help of the de Blasio administration to rezone the area in the coming weeks before Mr. Beninati can get construction permits.

“It’s just way too big for the neighborhood,” Ms. Brewer said.

Still, the last time the neighborhood tried to stop a project, in 2000, its lawsuit against the developer was dismissed. That developer was Donald J. Trump, who ended up building a 72-story condominium at First Avenue and 47th Street.

In the meantime, Mr. Beninati insists that he has already acquired enough property and development rights, or air rights, from surrounding buildings to erect his tower even without Mr. Werth’s building. Mr. Beninati wants to buy Mr. Werth’s building and others nearby to make room for a bigger base for his proposed tower.

“We can’t have a city where people can just change the rules when they feel like it,” he said of the opposition’s effort to rezone the neighborhood.

So far, Mr. Beninati said he had spent about $120 million for land and tenant buyouts. He hired Cushman & Wakefield to find a financial partner and construction financing for the project, which will cost about $650 million to complete.

After months of fruitless hunting, Mr. Beninati said he remained confident he would find a partner. He said the apartments should sell for an average of $5,500 per square foot, or more than $43.5 million for a penthouse. Mr. Beninati is also actively trying to buy additional parcels on three sides of his site in order to expand the base of the tower, if not add to its height.

“It’s a real opportunity to do something special,” Mr. Beninati said, “but if a joint venture partner doesn’t show up, I’ll have no choice but to sell.”

Mr. Beninati started his career on Wall Street and by the early 2000s he and his partners formed Antares Investment Partners, a real estate company that at its height claimed $6 billion in assets. The novice developers built speculative mega-mansions in Greenwich, Conn., and gained control of Harbor Point, a sprawling $3.5 billion development site on 82 acres in Stamford, Conn.

But in a classic case of overleveraging, Antares stumbled in the early days of the recession and lost control of most of its assets to lenders and investors.

Mr. Beninati resurfaced in Manhattan, forming the Bauhouse Group, which bought a building on West 29th Street in Hudson Yards with plans to convert it to condominiums and retail. But little has happened there since Bauhouse obtained a $35 million construction loan 14 months ago.

A stocky man whose salt-and-pepper hair falls to the collar of his bespoke suit, Mr. Beninati has the supreme confidence of a promoter who believes he can personally persuade building owners, tenants and others to come around to his way of thinking.

Late last year, a broker, Adelaide Polsinelli of Eastern Consolidated, brought Mr. Beninati to the owner of three buildings on 58th Street, which he bought in January.

The rent-regulated residents of the three buildings were protected under New York tenant laws so he could not simply evict them.

Instead, Mr. Beninati called the tenants personally, talked with them for hours and offered them millions of dollars and assistance in finding new homes. Unlike Mr. Werth, Jack Lesko took the money.

“I love the guy,” Mr. Lesko said of Mr. Beninati. Mr. Lesko said he decided to leave his rent-regulated unit after the developer offered him a substantial sum, which he declined to disclose. “I had mixed feelings. But I’m now living in Florida with a 30-foot terrace and a cognac in my hand.”

Mr. Beninati’s company bought the air rights from several buildings on the block, including a co-op composed of two small buildings. It paid the co-op more than $11 million with Mr. Beninati’s partner, Chris Jones, telling the co-op members he expected to build a “13-story” building next door, according to the board’s notes from the meeting.

Mr. Beninati claims Mr. Jones never said 13 stories.

Whatever the truth, some co-op members were dismayed to learn what Mr. Beninati had in mind. Residents worried about the noise and inconvenience of construction, while others said they should have gotten more money.

But they are now resigned to the tower and are negotiating to sell their buildings entirely to Mr. Beninati for about $45 million. But the deal requires that four rent-regulated tenants, including Mr. Werth, agree to move.

Elias C. Schwartz, a lawyer for the co-op who recently met with Mr. Werth, said he conveyed an offer from the developer to Mr. Werth that included $1 million, although Mr. Werth said there was never a cash offer.

“The best thing for him is to avail himself of an extremely generous offer from the developer,” Mr. Schwartz said.

But Mr. Werth said he had no desire to leave a block where he knows many residents, the doormen and even the drugstore clerk who once kept the store open late to fill his prescriptions.

A Princeton graduate, Mr. Werth never married, although he said he still has a few lady friends. His career took him from the Army to American Airlines, Bankers Trust, the city’s redevelopment board and self-employment.

He wants to remain close to the bus lines that take him to his doctors and the Hospital for Special Surgery. “It’s like being in a small town,’’ he said. “Even if they paid me lots of money and got me into an apartment around here, it wouldn’t be the same.”
Honestly, I'm with these NIMBYs on this one. Developers need to stick to places like Midtown and the Financial District for this type of thing. It's not even a good looking tower.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 11:00 PM   #27
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Old October 23rd, 2015, 06:53 PM   #28
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http://www.ctbuh.org/News/GlobalTall...S/Default.aspx

Skyscraper Foes Raising Money to Fund Review for Sutton Place Rezoning Plan in New York
New York City, United States – 23 October 2015

Quote:
A coalition of politicians and anti-development activists is looking to pay its own way to push through proposed rezoning that would limit the construction of new skyscrapers in the Upper East Side neighborhood's residential areas.

Councilman Ben Kallos is working with the East River 50s Alliance – a community group that coalesced around an effort to defeat plans for a 900-foot (274-meter) skyscraper in Sutton Place – to raise the money and dole it out to the analysts, planners, and lawyers that the activists will need in order to usher a rezoning bid through the city’s uniform land-use review process (ULURP).

A grassroots stab at a ULURP rezoning is an unusual tactic, as most rezonings come at the request of the city or an individual developer looking to build a project not allowed under an area’s current regulations.

If the Department of City Planning certifies the group’s application for rezoning, the plea will then go for public review by the Community Board, the Borough President, the City Planning Commission, the City Council, and, finally, the mayor.

Beyond an application fee of about $30,000 for a neighborhood rezoning of more than 500,000 square feet (46,000 square meters), a ULURP does not cost the applicant anything. But in order to make sure the application is filled out correctly and in order to ensure that an entity is making a good case for the rezoning, entities generally must hire land-use lawyers and other experts to help move the rezoning through the necessary hoops, according to a Department of City Planning spokesman.

Neighbors opposed to the Sutton Place tower plan met in July to begin organizing against developer Bauhaus Group which, thanks to current zoning regulations, is free to build the skyscraper as-of-right unless opponents can successfully impose height restrictions.

Bauhaus Group, is currently steaming ahead with the project, having bought up properties between 426 and 432 E. 58th St. in January for $32 million. In August the firm finished assembling the air rights necessary for the project, shelling out $37.9 million for the air rights from several nearby properties, according to a report by Curbed.

At the end of September, the Department of Buildings approved demolition applications for those properties, city records show.
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Old October 23rd, 2015, 07:44 PM   #29
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According to the article, these are the buildings that will be removed:



Not sure if others on either side might also be slated for demo.
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Old October 24th, 2015, 10:06 AM   #30
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Wow. What shame
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Old October 25th, 2015, 09:20 PM   #31
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432 is nice, the rest are forgettable.
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Old October 25th, 2015, 11:18 PM   #32
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I'd say that 430 is the only one I'd be okay with seeing go. It's hilarious that in NYC the NIMBYS are just trying to protect the historic housing, and have somewhat of a legitimate case? When in Minneapolis they try to protect their parking lots
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Old December 1st, 2015, 04:43 AM   #33
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New Rendering:

[IMG][/IMG]


Quote:
Upper East Side, brace: Sutton Place's 80-story tower is coming. Word has arrived in the Curbed inbox that developer Bauhouse Group has filed demolition permits for the existing buildings at 426-432 East 58th Street, which will be razed to make room for the 900-foot, 115-apartment luxury tower designed by Norman Foster.

Of course Bauhouse Group head honcho Joseph Beninati could not be more pleased, "These permits signal exciting progress for the project," Beninati said in a statement, "[W]e believe that our world class team and union contractors will develop a building that mirrors the elegance and storied past of the Sutton Place neighborhood."

It sounds like the developer and the community have two different ideas about how to honor the quiet Upper East Side enclave. In August, backed by a growing alliance of area co-op and condo boards, Councilman Ben Kallos (who adamantly opposes the project) told the Times that his move to rally against the development is "about preserving our residential neighborhoods and the light and air for the people who live there."

Construction permits have yet to be filed for the building. In August, Beninati told the New York Times that the Bauhouse Group wouldn't be able to move forward with the project without securing a financial partner, but today's announcement confirms that Bauhouse has found that partner in Carlton Group.

In addition to the four sites, Bauhouse Group acquired 270,000 square feet of air rights. The 900-foot tower will be able to rise as-of-right, meaning the only thing that's stopping in is a midnight rezoning of the area.
==============================
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/1..._to_rising.php
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Old December 1st, 2015, 07:32 PM   #34
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Wow! I understand the issue people have with this building and its lack of contextuality, but taken alone as a piece of architecture, I really really like this design. The combination of those earthy tones and the proportions of those windows strikes me as profoundly midcentury modern.

My two qualms: the seeming randomness of those corner cut-outs, and my own skepticism that those tree-lined garden levels will actually be that green. We have seen that concept in renders for what seems like dozens of buildings now, but until we see it executed and that these trees can actually grow in a highrise context (or that we have the ability to keep them alive), I'm not holding my breath.
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Old December 1st, 2015, 09:07 PM   #35
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Demolition Permits Obtained For Bauhouse’s 900-Foot Tower At 426-432 East 58th Street, Sutton Place

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The Bauhouse Group’s planned 900-foot-tall residential development near the East Side’s Sutton Place has been in the works for months and now tangible progress is about to happen. The developer has obtained demolition permits for the assemblage at 426-432 East 58th Street, it announced Monday.
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Old December 2nd, 2015, 05:04 AM   #36
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The greenery almost certainly won't become a reality. It's such an annoying trick developers use in renderings to make the whole thing look more palatable.
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Old December 5th, 2015, 09:14 PM   #37
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Here's the block where this is allegedly going to rise:



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Old December 7th, 2015, 01:30 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bodegavendetta View Post
The greenery almost certainly won't become a reality. It's such an annoying trick developers use in renderings to make the whole thing look more palatable.
True.

However, it would be nice to have gardens or terraces at those locations.
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Old January 19th, 2016, 03:10 PM   #39
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From Crains: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...pertall-towers
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Old January 19th, 2016, 05:28 PM   #40
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^ Potential supertall!

http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...pertall-towers

The little loophole helping developers build higher supertall towers

Developers are constructing skyscrapers on stilts

By Daniel Geiger

Quote:
Like a long list of other developers in recent years, Beninati wants to raise the tallest tower he can--a spire that could reach as high as 1,000 feet.
Quote:
To raise his Sutton Place building's height, Beninati said his mechanical floors will be 24 feet high, far taller than mechanical spaces in projects built even just a few years ago, and about double the height of most residential floors in the property. Doing that, he estimates, will add 100 or more feet to his project--allowing more of his units to clear that 700-foot threshold.
Suck it NIMBYs - you wanted a shorter tower, well now you'll get a supertall instead!
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