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Old May 24th, 2015, 11:33 PM   #1
foxmulder
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SOUTH AMERICA | Transcontinental Rail Project | Under Feasibility Study

China, Brazil, Peru agree on feasibility study on transcontinental railway: Chinese premier


English.news.cn | 2015-05-23 15:52:42
PERU-LIMA-CHINESE PREMIER-PRESS CONFERENCE

LIMA, May 22 (Xinhua) -- China, Brazil and Peru have decided to conduct a feasibility study on a proposed transcontinental railway line connecting Peru's Pacific coast with Brazil's Atlantic coast, visiting Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said here on Friday.

The three countries have also agreed to speed up the work of their joint working group for an early, substantial progress in the project, so as to drive the economic development along the railway and accelerate industrialization and urbanization in South America under the condition of environmental protection and biological diversity, Li told reporters after talks with Peruvian President Ollanta Humala.

Li said that during his ongoing visit to Latin America, he and leaders of Brazil, Colombia and Peru agreed to build new highlights in pragmatic cooperation in such fields as trade investment, industrial capacity cooperation, equipment manufacturing, and infrastructure construction.

The premier pointed out that China has accumulated a great deal of experience in railway construction, saying Chinese-made equipment has enjoyed advantages of high safety and cost performance ratios and has stood the test of international market competitions.

The Chinese side is willing to actively take part in building the transcontinental railway line and rail transit projects in relevant countries, strengthen technology transfer while conducting cooperation in equipment and other areas, boost interconnection in South America, promote regional economic development, and better realize mutually-beneficial and win-win results, he said.

Humala said the two countries' free trade agreement and comprehensive strategic partnership fully indicate that Peru-China relations have developed smoothly with broad prospects.

He described Li's visit to Peru as a great event in the history of development of Peru-China relations, saying the Peruvian side is willing to keep expanding cooperation with China.

The president voiced his appreciation for a series of proposals raised by China on supporting Peru's industrialization, noting that China is welcome to add investment in the South American country in such areas as mining and agriculture.

The two sides signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on the feasibility study on the transcontinental railway line, which has consolidated and lifted the Peru-China friendly relationship of cooperation to higher levels, he said.

The MoU will help Peru realize better development and boost common development and prosperity of Peru, Brazil, China and the region, Humala said.

Peru is the third leg of Li's four-nation tour to Latin America after Brazil and Colombia. He will also visit Chile.
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Old May 25th, 2015, 12:36 AM   #2
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Which gauge will it be built at?
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Old May 25th, 2015, 11:33 AM   #3
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The project appears to be quite beneficial for the coastal development of Peru.
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Old July 21st, 2015, 09:50 PM   #4
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Quote:
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Which gauge will it be built at?
Supposedly to be built at 1600mm gauge, as it won't connect to Peruvian railways (1435mm). The main purpose is to haul soya beans and derivatives from western states of Brazil (mainly Goias and Mato Grosso) to China via peruvian ports.
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Old July 21st, 2015, 10:53 PM   #5
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Sounds good, but routes straight through young mountains (the Andes) are, by far, the hardest to build. Of course the Chinese are trying to build a new rail route through the Himalaya so there's that, but ... the latter has the advantage of the Brahmaputra offering a natural gap, while the Andes are probably the world's sheerest natural wall.
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Old July 22nd, 2015, 04:00 AM   #6
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This is a really cool project(we can overlook the political implications).

Pacific South America never had a good railway network. But with this line I wonder if a new network could emerge to feed into it.

Quote:
Supposedly to be built at 1600mm gauge, as it won't connect to Peruvian railways (1435mm). The main purpose is to haul soya beans and derivatives from western states of Brazil (mainly Goias and Mato Grosso) to China via peruvian ports.
Are all the modern main lines 1600mm?
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Old July 22nd, 2015, 05:11 PM   #7
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In Brazil there are two standard gauges: the 1000mm (no new railway in this gauge though) and the 1600mm,including two brand new railways ( FIOL and Norte Sul - see Brazil Railway thread). Even modern subway systems in Sao Paulo and Rio are both 1600mm, except for the modern and driverless Yellow Line in Sao Paulo, which is 1435mm. Thereīs no formal reason to do that, but some historians say it was because of war and the fear of invasions via railway from neighbour contries (1435mm gauge). A bit insane, though.
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Old July 22nd, 2015, 05:25 PM   #8
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The railway plan: the first part they intend to build is from Uruaįu to Peru. The second part is Atlantic Ocean bound, from Uruaįu too. Probably the second part wonīt have chinese money.
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Old July 24th, 2015, 02:23 AM   #9
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Here's my guess as to how they're planning on getting across the Andes -- 100% guaranteed to be the most difficult and expensive part -- assuming the line terminates in Lima (it wouldn't make any sense for it to end anywhere else) and heads through Acre's largest city, Rio Branco.

My guess is that they're going to cross them utilizing the same alignment as Peru's Rt. 22, which, when you look at the terrain, suggests that this section will be about as rugged as the Colorado Rockies (marked black). Another scenario (blue) would run the line south from La Oroya or Tarma to Huancayo and then down what looks like a larger gap in the mountains to the Ene River at Canayre, following the water level up to Puerto Ocopa and Atalaya, from which it would head off to Brazil (which is how a Victorian engineer would have done it). The problem with this alignment is obviously that it is significantly more circuitous. But of course, when it comes to mountain railroading, it is and has always been grade which is the final arbiter of whether or not a line can be viable.

That also opens the possibility for a different route from Acre to the edge of the Andes (marked red), but this route would head straight through a national park, whereas the more northerly alignment doesn't.

Also why start at Uruacu? That's kilometers and kilometers east of where the most work will have to be done. The only reason why it would make sense is if that's the current 1600 mm network's railhead ... (finds the place on Google Maps) ... It looks like there's a north-south RR U/C that passes through the city. So it would indeed be a good railhead for an E-W project.

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Old July 24th, 2015, 10:37 PM   #10
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The chinese investors should support the construction of new cristo redentor tunnel in the Argentine Andes to Chile (52 km) or other in 1000 mm (allowing the interconection of brazilian network) in the north of Argentina.
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Old July 28th, 2015, 09:18 AM   #11
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I still think going through Peru and Amazonia is not the best option. They should consider go thru Argentina or even Paraguay instead.
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Old July 28th, 2015, 10:41 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulista1978 View Post
I still think going through Peru and Amazonia is not the best option. They should consider go thru Argentina or even Paraguay instead.
Depends on what you're looking to do. If you want to create a fast intermodal link then e.g. Santiago-Buenos Aires makes perfect sense (assuming a good trans-Andean route can be found).

But if you're interested in agricultural products then you actually want a longer road -- one that passes through more agricultural regions. And the regions that produce the kinds of crops that you want dictate your routing choice.

China's beef industry AFAIK is doing pretty well. It doesn't really need the kind of traffic pampas ranches would generate (also doesn't most Argentine beef wind up in Europe?). What they're really after are more staple crops, like maize and soybeans, which grow well in Brazil's southern highlands -- the area the new route is passing through.

Think of it less like the Santa Fe and more like the Northern Pacific.

ETA: Oh wow, would you look at that ramp east of Santiago! What a thing of beauty! The Rio Volcan gets you up to the 3000 m mark on an easy grade and you've got a serviceable descent gorge on the other side.
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Old July 28th, 2015, 04:34 PM   #13
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Looking at the map. The region that produces the soybeans is around Lucas do Rio Verde (to say true, itīs the whole of Mato Grosso (MT) state that make up most of soybeam production; Thereīs a fast growing production in Rondonia (RO) Though). The problem is that the railway is going to cross the Amazonia. The Andes in Peru (I believe) is not as so steep as in Chile, but itīs longer, demanding more tunnels.

Actually thereīs a railway not in use that connects Mendoza (ARG) with chilean border. I dont know if itīs possible to go to Chile as the Andes is more steep on chilean side.
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Old July 28th, 2015, 10:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulista1978 View Post
Looking at the map. The region that produces the soybeans is around Lucas do Rio Verde (to say true, itīs the whole of Mato Grosso (MT) state that make up most of soybeam production; Thereīs a fast growing production in Rondonia (RO) Though). The problem is that the railway is going to cross the Amazonia. The Andes in Peru (I believe) is not as so steep as in Chile, but itīs longer, demanding more tunnels.

Actually thereīs a railway not in use that connects Mendoza (ARG) with chilean border. I dont know if itīs possible to go to Chile as the Andes is more steep on chilean side.
You're starting to see the problems of mountain railroading.

While it is indeed true that Los Libertadores Pass's Argentine side is better than its Chilean side -- it runs west from Mendoza through the mountains and then south to Santiago -- the route up the Rio Volcan east of Santiago has a better ramp on its Chilean side (wide valley) than the Argentine one (very narrow gorge). It's actually kind of rare for a good route into the mountains to match up well with one back out of them.
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Old October 10th, 2015, 04:35 PM   #15
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Here is an article about China's railway proposals in Latin America, mostly about the Brazil-Peru project.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/04/wo...temail0=y&_r=1
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Old October 11th, 2015, 08:10 AM   #16
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