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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:49 AM   #21
DuskTrooper
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Are they actually going to build that Borg Cube?
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Old February 24th, 2005, 04:14 AM   #22
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yup, apparently they will begin site prep this summer. It won't look so isolated in person as other projects will also be going up as well as new streetscaping. Its weird, but it will stand out as will the Wyly. It's probably not as bad as the rendering makes it look. Basically its one of those inside out buildings that you find in Europe.
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Old February 24th, 2005, 05:52 AM   #23
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Sweet.
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Old February 24th, 2005, 06:10 AM   #24
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The West End/Victory area is becoming one of the areas biggest museum districts

Natural History museum plans move
Officials hoping to finalize West End deal by end of year


11:56 PM CDT on Friday, August 20, 2004


By TOM SIME / The Dallas Morning News



The Dallas Museum of Natural History has landed a deal to move downtown from Fair Park, its home since 1936, and take on a new name, the Museum of Nature and Science.

The Dallas Museum of Natural History Association announced plans Friday to purchase land close to Woodall Rodgers Freeway and Field Street, near the Victory development and American Airlines Center and a few blocks from the Dallas Museum of Art and Dallas World Aquarium. The site now includes a parking lot and the marketing center for the W Dallas Victory Hotel and Residences, which is under construction a few blocks north.

The deal should be complete by the end of the year, and an architect will be selected after that, said museum chief executive Nicole Small. "We are under contract, and ... we have full intent to close," she said. The closing will be "around the end of the year."

In early 2001, the museum announced it would hire famed California architect Frank Gehry to design a $100 million facility in the Arts District. The location has changed, but the architect may not. "Frank Gehry is a possibility," Ms. Small said. "We've been talking to him for a couple of years. ... If it's not Frank Gehry, it will be someone of the same caliber. ... Probably next year, we'll make a decision."

Mr. Gehry was traveling Friday and could not be reached for comment. His office could not confirm that he is still considering the Dallas project.

Ms. Small said the cost would probably still be around $100 million. "We're just at the beginning, so we don't have a specific number," she said. She declined to specify the price of the land.

The name change "just seems to make sense," she added. "It really is most descriptive of what our concept is."

The new museum will not replace or affect the unrelated Science Place in Fair Park.

Tim Ewing, chairman of the board of the museum association, expressed satisfaction with the West End location. "It's in a very vibrant part of the revitalization of downtown, right there at the corner of the Victory development," he said. "We have the West End within a stone's throw and two of the most visited attractions in the city of Dallas that are not shopping malls: the Dallas World Aquarium and the Sixth Floor Museum."

Mr. Ewing would not reveal who was selling the land except to describe them as among the "entities developing Victory." But he added that "we will not be part of the Victory development."


The museum "is going to be an exciting educational destination," Ms. Small said. "We're going to talk about nature, science, math, the environment. The exhibits are going to be wide-ranging, interactive, cutting-edge technology. ... We're looking at what the best models are across the country, and really across the world, because very few cities ever have an opportunity to start from scratch and build a building that really inspires minds through nature and science."
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Old February 24th, 2005, 06:18 AM   #25
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An 'entryway' for Oak Cliff
$24M+ project to turn area's tallest building into condos
Christine Perez and Sandra Zaragoza
Staff Writers
A neglected area of Oak Cliff may soon be transformed into a bustling retail and residential gateway.


Armed with $4.1 million in support from the city of Dallas, local developer Steve Everbach is renovating the historic Lake Cliff Tower at Colorado and Zang boulevards into 60 upscale condominiums.

It's the largest component of Oak Cliff Gateway, a $24.5 million mixed-use development that will also include a new shopping center and a bank on nearby parcels.

Built in 1928 as a luxury hotel, Lake Cliff Tower has been vacant for years. The 12-story, 85,000-square-foot building -- the tallest in Oak Cliff -- looks out on Founders Park and Lake Cliff Park, as well as downtown Dallas.

"It's rare that a developer gets an opportunity to go in and materially improve an area like this," Everbach said. "We're really changing the entire feel of the neighborhood for the better."

This is Everbach's first project on his own, but he has been down the condo/redevelopment road before.

Prior to launching Evergreen Partners last June, he was an executive with Dallas-based Lazarus Property Corp., which transformed an obsolete office building at 1505 Elm St. into about 65 upscale condominiums -- the first such project in downtown Dallas.

Everbach believes Lake Cliff Tower will enjoy similar success. More than 60% of the units have been presold, he said.

"Sales at the tower have far exceeded our expectations and exceeded the original pro forma," he said.

Dallas-based David Griffin & Co. is overseeing the condo sales.

The one- and two-bedroom units range in size from 900 square feet to 1,500 square feet, and in price from about $160,000 to more than $500,000. Amenities include high-speed Internet connections, a secured parking lot and a pool area overlooking Founders Park, complete with a large deck and fire pit. The property will be staffed around the clock by a doorman, porter, building engineer and manager.


Rogers, Ark.-based PB2 Architecture and Engineering is architect of record for the tower, as well as the retail components. Local designer Aida Latorre is handling the interiors. Dallas-based Precept Builders Inc. is serving as general contractor.

Plans call for restoration of the tower's exterior and a complete renovation of the interiors. Despite the fact that it was built more than 75 years ago, the building is structurally sound, said Dave Karcher, president of Precept.

"They don't build them like they used to," he said.

Karcher said renovation of Lake Cliff Tower is long overdue.

"There are some opinions that say substantive redevelopment of the Trinity Corridor is going to start in the northern part and move south," he said. "We're calling this Oak Cliff Gateway because we think it will really get the ball rolling."

Everbach is under contract with a regional financial institution to build a 10,000-square-foot, full-service bank at the corner of Colorado and Zang. He's also putting in a 32,000-square-foot retail center directly across the street from Lake Cliff Tower.

Its Mediterranean look will mirror the style of the condo tower, said Jill Tiernan, vice president with Dallas-based The Retail Connection, who is overseeing leasing of the retail center.

"It will be a great entryway into Oak Cliff," she said. "I think it will spur additional development."

Fitness guru Larry North will anchor the complex with a 10,000-square-foot Larry North Fitness Center. It will be his first Metroplex location south of the Trinity.

Lake Cliff Tower

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Old February 24th, 2005, 08:04 AM   #26
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Example of the kind of retail that Victory will house

Fashion Lift
Ort Varona’s newest store looks to score at Victory.
by Stephanie Quadri

Ort Varona may have started out with a career in counseling, but retail is his therapy. The psychology major turned entrepreneur thought Dallas lacked a store that catered to urban-chic adults, so he created Premium 93 and Octane, two of the hottest stores in the West Village. “We didn’t have a place to shop, so we created one,” Varona says.

But the 34-year-old is a little restless, so he’s expanding his arsenal of stores with the Lift Fashion Terminal in the Victory development, which will open in the spring of 2006. Located in the area around the American Airlines Center, Victory is backed by Ross Perot Jr.’s Hillwood and Tom Hicks’ Southwest Sports Realty and is well on its way to being one of the most significant urban developments in the country. Victory will boast a W Hotel, big-name restaurants and clubs such as Nine and Ghost Bar, extravagant residences, a public promenade, and other amenities.

Varona teamed up with investors such as Hillwood’s Jonas Woods to create a 20,000-square-foot “not-quite-boutique, not-quite-department-store” destination that will house some of the most sought-after designer merchandise in the world. Some of the names you can expect to see include Ted Baker, J.Lindeberg, Chip & Pepper, and—dare we say?—Prada. Lift will also have one of the best denim collections in town and will make custom jeans on-site. Mix that with airport design circa 1960s with German- and Japanese-influenced styles, personal appearances by designers, a cocktail lounge, and even an on-site fashion photographer, and you get a sense of Varona’s ambitions.

Could this be the next Barneys New York or LA’s Fred Segal? “It won’t be a cookie-cutter store; it’s a fresh look on retail,” he says. “Dallas is so forward and more willing to take risks than other cities, including Los Angeles or New York. We are the consumers for the next 40 years; our parents are over.”
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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:15 PM   #27
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Bryan Street Station

Downtown For-Sale Units Under Way
By Bob Howard
Last updated: April 13, 2004 09:32pm

DALLAS-Pradera Development of Dallas has started construction on one of the few for-sale housing projects in the city, its 48-unit Bryan Street Station condominium development.

David McKay, a Pradera principal, tells GlobeSt.com that the company expects to deliver the units later this year, with total revenue from sales projected at $10 million. McKay says Pradera sees demand for for-sale housing in the $120,000 to $200,000 price range that Bryan Street Station will offer. While something like 10,000 new housing units have been built within a mile of Downtown Dallas in the past 10 years, McKay says, less than 4% of them have been for-sale units and those for-sale units have been priced much higher than the Bryan Street Station condos will be. One reason that so many of the new units are apartments, he explains, is that institutional investors are putting up the money for them and the institutional investors want income-producing properties. McKay notes that the Pradera project’s location is three blocks from the Pearl Street DART Rail Station, Baylor Medical Center, Deep Ellum and the Arts District, a short walk from the heart of Downtown.

Bryan Street Station initially will consist of two structures, each of them with an at-grade concrete parking structure and three levels of residential units above, with a central elevator serving each level. Each of the two buildings will include 24 units that McKay describes as “European style flats.” A third structure of eight town-home units is also planned.

McKay estimates monthly mortgage payments for the 48 units will start around $685 per month, depending on loan terms, which he says “offers ownership at the cost of rent.” Pradera Development LLC is a privately held real estate development company focusing on acquisitions, development and dispositions.

One of the buildings
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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:21 PM   #28
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Mixed-use project planned for former Maharishi site
Christine Perez - Staff Writer
http://dallas.bizjournals.com/dalla...y16.html?page=1

Realty America Group and Behringer Harvard Funds, two Dallas-based real estate investment companies, have acquired the former Hilton Inn in Dallas and are planning an $80 million redevelopment of the property. The hotel, now the Hotel Santa Fe at 5600 N. Central Expressway, sits on about 5.5 acres at the southeast corner of Mockingbird Lane and North Central Expressway. It previously was owned by an organization founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, father of the Transcendental Meditation movement, who gained fame in the 1960s as a spiritual advisor to the Beatles. The Maharishi School of Vedic Science paid about $2 million for the facility when it bought it in 1993. Terms of the sale to Realty America and Behringer were not disclosed.

Realty America and Behringer Harvard have big plans for the property, including a four-star hotel, high-rise luxury condominiums and retail -- all scheduled for completion in the second quarter of 2006. "This landmark site is a jewel in the rough and a strategic fit within the Behringer Harvard Short-Term Fund portfolio, said Robert Behringer, founder and CEO. "It will benefit from strong local demographic demand for the urban resort lifestyle." San Francisco-based Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, often credited for launching the boutique hotel trend, is negotiating to operate the hotel and relaunch it as The Hotel Palomar. Three Architecture Inc., a Dallas-based architectural firm, is working with Kimpton's design team to transform the nine-story hotel tower, which will house 185 rooms.

"Each of our hotels tells a story, and we are looking forward to implementing our signature style through renovations that will allow us to highlight the Mockingbird's rich history and share its unique story," said Niki Leondakis, chief operating officer of Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants. "Realty America Group and Behringer Harvard Funds have purchased a unique jewel of a hotel, and we believe affiliating with them will be a great introduction for us into the Dallas market." Two luxury penthouse condominiums will be developed atop The Hotel Palomar, and eight two-story loft condos will be built above the space formerly occupied by a Trader Vic's restaurant. Ground-level changes will create about 25,000 square feet of new retail space.

In addition, a new nine-story condominium tower will be built south of the hotel, adding about 60 new residences to the mix. The one-, two- and three-bedroom floor plans will range in size from 900 square feet to 3,000 square feet, plus 5,000 square feet for the luxury penthouses. Prices will range from $300,000 to $1.6 million. Allie Beth Allman & Associates has been tapped to market the residential portion of the development, with sales kicking off in January.

The condos will include large terraces, and all residences will have views of either downtown Dallas, East Dallas or the Park Cities, said Jeff Berry, who co-founded Realty America with Kip Sowden in 2002. "There is not a better location in the entire D-FW Metroplex for a first-class, mixed-use urban lifestyle development anchored by the only Kimpton hotel in Texas," he said. Realty America Development, a division of Realty America Group headed by industry veteran Phil Brosseau, will oversee the project. Sam Gillespie will provide developmental oversight for Behringer. Gillespie recently joined Behringer after 21 years at Trammell Crow Co., where he last served as managing director of national accounts.


Luxury hotel to rise at Mockingbird-Central
Retail-condo complex to replace former Hilton
09:27 PM CST on Monday, November 8, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...lton.db9a2.html

Developers have bought the aging Hilton Inn – more recently called Hotel Santa Fe – at Mockingbird Lane and North Central Expressway and plan to turn it into a luxury hotel, shopping and condo complex. Work on the $80 million project will start before the end of the year and includes a 10-story residential high-rise. The original 1960s hotel tower will be renovated to be operated by San Francisco's exclusive Kimpton Hotels. The redevelopment will also contain about 25,000 square feet of lower-level retail with loft-style condos above it in a low-rise building facing Mockingbird Lane.

Realty America Group

The complex at Mockingbird Lane and Central Expressway will feature a hotel, shopping center and high-rise condos. "We want to return this property to its glory days," said Kip Sowden, principal with Realty America Group, which bought the property on Monday in partnership with Behringer Harvard Funds. "We don't think there is a better location in Dallas-Fort Worth than the corner of Mockingbird and Central." Developers are hurrying to catch up with what they see as immediate demand for hotel rooms and housing. Since DART opened its light-rail station at the intersection in 1996, the surrounding neighborhood has increased in importance. The popular Mockingbird Station retail, cinema and apartment complex is just across the street, and new rental units have been built nearby.

But the old Hilton Inn has languished. Since 1993, it has been owned by the Maharishi School of Vedic Science, founded by 1960s spiritual icon Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It was still operating as Hotel Santa Fe until Monday, when the staff and guests were notified that it would close immediately. Other developers had tried to buy the hotel from the Maharishi and redevelop it without success. One sale that fell through resulted in a lawsuit. "That site really does deserve a premier development given the location, and it's on public transit," said investor Robert Behringer. "We've looked at this property for years, but we didn't have the patience to reel this one in. "When Realty America told us that they had control of this property and were interested in a partnership with us, we were very excited," he said.

Construction plans

Demolition will start within 45 days. The new owners will turn the nine-story hotel – built in 1967 – into the 185-room Hotel Palomar. Low-rise buildings just south of the hotel will be demolished to make way for the 60-unit, 10-story condo high-rise. There's also room on the 5.5-acre site for a third condo building, developers say. Allie Beth Allman & Associates Realtors has already started marketing the building and has about 10 presales. The condos will range in price from about $300,000 to more than $1 million, said agent Kyle Crews. "We expect the sales to go very fast," Mr. Crews said. "The success of the W and Ritz-Carlton hotel and condo buildings have proven the success of this concept."

The W Dallas Victory Hotel and Residences are under construction across from American Airlines Center, and the Residences at the Ritz-Carlton are planned for a site in Uptown. Developer Ken Hughes, who built Mockingbird Station, said the project will be a boost for the area. "It's very significant, and it should cause more things to happen," he said. "Kimpton is a great boutique hotel operator."

High marks for manager

Founded in 1981, Kimpton has 38 hotels in North America. The company recently opened hotels in San Francisco, Boston and New York and has a hotel under construction in San Diego. "After we studied Kimpton, we knew they were just the right hotel group to bring in for their first project in Texas," said Jeff Berry of Realty America Group. Dallas-based Three Architecture designed the new buildings and drew up plans for redeveloping the original tower, which was designed by noted local architect Ralph Kelman. Construction should be under way by the first quarter, and the entire project is set to be finished in April 2006.

"We have waited a long time for the development of this property, and this is the perfect opportunity," said Dallas City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill. "This area is poised for great things, and I know the neighbors will be pleased to see this happening." Behringer Harvard Funds, which underwrites national real-estate investment funds, also recently bought several Dallas-area office buildings.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com



This sits across Mockingbird from Mockingbird Station
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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:28 PM   #29
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A Depression-era downtown skyscraper is in line to get a restoration.


File 1999/Staff photo
The DP&L Building at 1700 Commerce was designed by Lang & Witchell.

The historic Dallas Power & Light Building at Commerce and Browder streets is under contract to Denver developer Hamilton Properties, which wants to renovate it for residential and retail space.

The 19-story, art deco-inspired high-rise is one of the last unrestored downtown office buildings from that era.

Built in 1931 as the corporate headquarters for Dallas' electric company, the DP&L Building has been empty for several years since the utility – now a part of TXU Corp. – moved its operations to the Energy Plaza skyscraper at Bryan and Ervay streets.

"It's a wonderful building," said Dallas City Councilwoman Veletta Forsythe Lill. "And we are fortunate that a developer that is already making a contribution to downtown is looking at another project."

Currently, Hamilton Properties is restoring the 76-year-old Davis Building on Main Street into 183 loft apartments and retail space.

Hamilton Properties has asked the city to include the DP&L Building in the city center tax increment financing district. The move would allow the project to receive public-sector backing.

Officials with Hamilton Properties could not be reached for details of their renovation plans.

The renovation would include multiple properties on the block. Along with the DP&L Tower, the complex includes an adjoining 14-story office tower, a two-story connecting building and a Jackson Street parking lot. All of the buildings are owned by an affiliate of TXU.

The DP&L Building – with its stained-glass windows and polished stone lobby – was designed by renowned architects Lang & Witchell, which also created the Lone Star Gas Co. headquarters and Fair Park Music Hall.

When it was built, the DP&L tower was the tallest welded-steel building in the Southwest.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com



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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:34 PM   #30
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Downtown grocer on its way



June opening planned for store; renovations also include lofts


08:19 PM CST on Saturday, November 13, 2004

By DAVE LEVINTHAL / The Dallas Morning News

Hardhat-clad la for urban renewal.

"People will see a very vibrant portion of downtown here," Dallas Assistant City Manager Ryan Evans said, adding that the city plans to beautify nearby roads with trees and other streetscape elements next year.

Barker Nichols originally scheduled the start of Interurban Building renovations for several months ago, but "with a project as complex as this, if it's only a couple of months late, it's a tremendous victory," Mr. Evans said.

Developers initially tapped Dallas resident and former Fresh Approach grocer Danny Furr to operate the Interurban Building supermarket under the Fresh Approach name.

Barker Nichols is now using "Urban Grocers" as the market's working moniker, and Mr. Johnson said he is "looking at several options right now" for grocery operators. Mr. Furr said he recently met with Barker Nichols to discuss the store. "We're still talking," he said.

In January, the City Council, in a unanimous voice vote, approved $5 million in tax increment finance funds to help redevelop the Interurban Building – once a stately bus terminal and office building.

But most recently, it has become a crumbling memorial borers are assaulting downtown Dallas blight, tearing out rotten window wells and scouring the insides of Jackson Street's Interurban Building, as its transformation from eyesore to supermarket commences.




Financing Clears for Interurban Building's $28M Makeover
By Jennifer D. Duell
Last updated: December 23, 2004 02:40pm

DALLAS-Local developer Merriman Associates has secured financing for the $28-million conversion of the historic Interurban Building, which served as the terminal for North Texas' vast electric railway system, into a class A, residential high-rise.
Merriman Associates' principals Chip Johnson, Craig MacKenzie and Randy Rost mined several financing sources, including a $5 million TIF grant from the city and $3.3 million in federal historic tax credits, says Bernard P. "Bud" Malone, president of Malone Mortgage Co. "This was a complex transaction," he says.

Dallas-based Malone Mortgage provided $18.2 million in construction and permanent financing for the Interurban project through HUD's 220 full-insurance Multifamily Accelerated Processing program. The 40-year loan fully amortizes over the term. Malone tells GlobeSt.com that the 18-month construction loan has an interest rate of 5.75%, which rolls into a 5.5% permanent loan. In addition to the first mortgage, Merriman Associates obtained a $1.5-million mezzanine loan from New York City-based New York Life Insurance Co.

Located at 1500 Jackson St. in Dallas' CBD, the 165,000-sf Interurban Building was built in 1916. The redevelopment calls for a ninth floor to be added to the building so it can be outfitted with 134 lofts, ranging from 669 sf to 1,638 sf. The average unit will be 827 sf. Rents will range from $700 to $1,700 per month. The project also will include a six-level parking garage with 450 spaces and a 20,000-sf, full-service grocery store. Construction began a month ago. Units will start to turn in September 2005.

Malone Mortgage has provided financing for several historic redevelopments. Its notable projects are the conversions of the Kirby Building , built in 1913, and the Santa Fe Terminal Lofts, circa 1920s, and San Antonio's Cadillac building in the CBD.


EXCLUSIVE REPORTS
From the December 31, 2004 print edition
Historic redevelopment
Christine Perez
Staff Writer


Dallas moneyman Bud Malone has put together $18.2 million in financing to fund redevelopment of the historic Interurban Building at 1500 Jackson St.

Built in 1916, the building formerly served as the terminal for North Texas' vast electric railway system. Developer Barker Nichols L.L.P. is transforming the property into 134 residential units, a six-story parking garage and -- drumroll, please -- a downtown grocery store.

"It's a milestone residential development for downtown Dallas," said Malone, president of Malone Mortgage Co.

Malone is no stranger to conversion projects. His company arranged financing for redevelopment of the Kirby Building and the Santa Fe Terminal Lofts in downtown Dallas. Both buildings were originally built in the early 1900s.

"Their success has proven up the double-barrel idea of living downtown and living in a high-rise as a way of life," he said.

Construction of the Interurban Building kicked off last month and is scheduled for completion in September 2005.

"The No. 1 thing that makes a downtown comeback is residential living," Malone said. "You can pour all the money you want into arts buildings and theaters and restaurants, but until you get downtown residential, it doesn't really become a vital base."

cperez@bizjournals.com | 214-706-7120



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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:45 PM   #31
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The Ashton u/c opens later this year






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Old February 24th, 2005, 03:53 PM   #32
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Of course there is plenty more going on. I'll try to update as stories come out so its not an absolute jam
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Old February 24th, 2005, 11:29 PM   #33
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Wow! Thanks Rantanamo for taking the time to post all of this.
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Old February 25th, 2005, 07:32 AM   #34
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2nd downtown tower speculation this year

7-Eleven may move downtown

One of its options is building a tower in the Arts District

11:32 PM CST on Thursday, February 24, 2005

By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News

7-Eleven Inc. may move downtown when its lease at the Cityplace tower runs out.

The convenience store giant is looking at an Arts District location for a new building and has shopped at least one other vacant building downtown, real estate brokers say.

If 7-Eleven moved downtown, it would be the biggest corporate headquarters to move into the central business district since Blockbuster Inc. in 1996.

7-Eleven sold the 42-story Cityplace building on North Central Expressway last year for $124 million. Its lease is up in just over two years.

"We continue to look at all options for our headquarters, and that includes remaining in this building," said Margaret Chabris, 7-Eleven's public relations director. "We have not made any decision about a move."

Real estate brokers say 7-Eleven's top relocation site is a 10-acre tract on the eastern edge of the Arts District.

Developer Lucy Billingsley owns the property at the intersection of Central Expressway and Woodall Rodgers Freeway that was recently added to the Arts District. The land is across the freeway from the booming Uptown neighborhood.

Preliminary plans call for a mixed-use development on the mostly vacant property.

"All I'll say is, I have been in contact with several different corporations about our downtown property," Ms. Billingsley said. "There is tremendous excitement about the Arts District."

If 7-Eleven moves inside the downtown freeway loop, it would be a coup for the central business district, property brokers say.

"It would be a huge win for downtown and signal that development in the core is back," said Joel Pustmueller of Peloton Real Estate. "If that project goes forward, it would anchor the Arts District on the east side.

"And it would provide great visibility on the skyline for someone like 7-Eleven," he said.

Because of the time required to build a large office project, a decision is probably close at hand, Mr. Pustmueller said.

"It would be outstanding if 7-Eleven relocates to downtown," said John Zogg, senior vice president of Crescent Real Estate Equities Co. "I know they are considering a new building as well as existing buildings."

"They would be endorsing all of the significant changes and vibrancy in downtown today," said Mr. Zogg, whose company is downtown Dallas' largest office landlord.

In recent months, 7-Eleven representatives have looked at existing buildings downtown and locations in the suburbs, brokers say.

Whether the company stays at Cityplace or moves to the central business district, keeping 7-Eleven in town is key, said Dallas City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill.

"We need to do whatever is necessary to keep them," she said.

7-Eleven built the Cityplace tower in 1988 and has had its headquarters in the skyscraper since then.

About 1,000 7-Eleven employees occupy almost 500,000 square feet in the 1.4 million-square-foot tower.

7-Eleven said when it sold Cityplace that its new landlord, Prentiss Properties, would owe an additional $14.5 million for the building if 7-Eleven decides to stay after its lease expires.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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Old February 25th, 2005, 08:05 AM   #35
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How about we just pickup the building and move it to downtown lol. I hope they go downtown.
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Old February 26th, 2005, 07:09 AM   #36
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Hopefully that mixed use devlopment for the 7-11 tower will be open 24 hours, if you know what I mean. (night life wise)
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Old February 26th, 2005, 09:14 AM   #37
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Virtually all of the new developments rantanamo has graciously documented in this thread are within a two mile radius of Dallas' central business district, and most lie in the NW quadrant - Uptown. For almost a decade the central city seemed to be in hibernation while the satellite cities became home to Fortune 500 companies and nearly one million new suburban residents (NOT including Fort Worth's share of the Metroplex). The renowned city planning which continues to attract more than 100,000 new residents a year to Dallas' suburbs and satellite cities is finally being joined by an urban development movement. The initial phase of the West Village opening in the late 90s, mark the beginning of the urban neighborhood expansion bringing more residents into the heart of the giant suburban metropolis. Anchored by two large master plans catering to more upscale and affluent clientele (West Village and especially Victory), Dallas' Uptown area will have several more years of consistent redevelopment.

Significant improvements and substantial depth to recreational opportunities are provided through the Trinity River Park, Centers for Performing Arts, (relocated & expanded) Museum of Nature and Science. Several additional DART train stations within the two mile radius of the CBD are scheduled to open within the next five years promising to exceed in scope and scale the current popular transit oriented developments. Lifestyle possibilities in Dallas are finally beginning to expand beyond suburban conveniences.
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Old March 1st, 2005, 03:47 AM   #38
rantanamo
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City Lights project east of downtown



01:39 PM CST on Saturday, February 19, 2005


By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News



More than a year after tying up land for the project, developers are still refining plans for a large shopping center to be built on the eastern edge of downtown Dallas.

Called City Lights, the retail complex is earmarked for more than two blocks near Live Oak Street and Good Latimer Expressway.

Margaux Development Co. originally intended to anchor the 350,000-square-foot shopping center with a supermarket, but lining up a tenant hasn't been easy.

"The grocery store market – which drove us to pick that site – is not what it once was," said Mickey Ashmore, president of United Commercial Realty, which is marketing the project.

Because of fierce competition in the supermarket industry, some grocers have slowed or halted construction of stores.

The recent opening of a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market grocery store near the City Lights site has also increased competition among supermarkets in that area.

"The developer has bought the land – it's not just under contract," Mr. Ashmore said. "And we are in serious discussions with six tenants.

"I think we will break ground this year and will have a 2006 or early 2007 opening," he said.

The proposed shopping center would have three levels of retail space plus more floors of parking.

"It's a very complicated project to engineer," Mr. Ashmore said.

While work on the City Lights project has continued, developers have moved forward with several condominium and townhouse developments in the same neighborhood.

Almost 200,000 people live in a three-mile radius of the planned shopping center.
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Old March 1st, 2005, 06:12 AM   #39
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TOD Time again in Dallas. This time up the Red Line across Central Expressway from North Park Mall. Apparently this project is very controversial with the city council(what isn't). Includes, hotel, residential, retail and the Park Lane LRT station.

Park Lane Place







Last edited by rantanamo; March 4th, 2005 at 10:53 AM.
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Old March 2nd, 2005, 09:05 PM   #40
rantanamo
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2 more blocks going up in the West Village as we speak. Here are the renderings

Next to Borders/BoA site and across McKinney Ave from the West Village main building. This will complete block 7C




and pics of dirt moving(as you can see the West Village area is growing very dense and into the form of the master rendering)


and across Blackburn from the main West Village and across McKinney from the Mondrian



and dirt moving at the site(The dense cluster of townhomes on the right is Knox Park)


both are mixed-use with retail and residential and part of the WV masterplan. Here are a couple of aerials of the area

West Village with Turtle Creek in the background(as you can see the West Village area is growing very dense and it along with Knox Park more than rival and surpass its Uptown neighbor to the south, State-Thomas)


Knox Park and North Dallas High School. The dense cluster of townhomes stretches to the Knox-Henderson strip where the two towers are in the upper right

Last edited by rantanamo; March 4th, 2005 at 11:12 AM.
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