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European Classic Architecture and Landscapes All related to historical buildings and landscapes of the old world.



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Old September 2nd, 2015, 08:37 PM   #61
cardiff
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Thanks, i dont think all the buildings fall within the thread time frame but a few do



[IMG]Untitled-1 by Stephen Anstiss, on Flickr[/IMG]

Last edited by cardiff; September 2nd, 2015 at 08:57 PM.
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Old September 7th, 2015, 12:16 AM   #62
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Grand Palais (also known as "Grand Palais des Beaux-Arts"), Paris :

Construction of the Grand Palais began in 1897 following the demolition of the Palais de l'Industrie (Palace of Industry) as part of the preparation works for the Universal Exposition of 1900.
The grand inauguration took place 1 May 1900, and from the very beginning the palace was the site of different kinds of shows in addition to the intended art exhibitions.
The competition to choose the architect was fierce and controversial, and ultimately resulted in the contract being awarded to a group of four architects, Henri Deglane, Albert Louvet, Albert Thomas and Charles Girault, each with a separate area of responsibility.
The structure was built in the style of Beaux-Arts architecture as taught by the École des Beaux-Arts of Paris.

The entrance on the Winston Churchill avenue side :


The great nave :


The entrance (now the Palais de la Découverte) on the Franklin-D.-Roosevelt avenue side :


The hall :


Last edited by Titus-Pullo; April 11th, 2016 at 12:52 AM.
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Old September 23rd, 2015, 10:43 AM   #63
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Hungarian Parliament Building, Budapest :

Budapest was united from three cities (Buda, Pest and Óbuda) in 1873 and seven years later the Diet resolved to establish a new, representative Parliament Building, expressing the sovereignty of the nation.
An international competition was held, and the Hungarian architect, Imre Steindl, emerged as the victor.
The winning plan was inspired by the palace of Westminster finished in London in 1836 with the Gothic Revival style.
The building was started in 1885 and was inaugurated on the 1000th anniversary of the country in 1896, then completed in 1904.
About one thousand people were involved in construction, during which 40 million bricks, half a million precious stones and 40 kilograms (88 lb) of gold were used...

On the bank of the Danube :


Interior :

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Old February 8th, 2016, 11:22 PM   #64
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Not a stately buildings but i hope you will turn a blind eye if i share some pictures here...

Hamburg St.Pauli.Navigationsschule. Albert Erbe (1903-1905)


























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Old February 8th, 2016, 11:31 PM   #65
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Hamburg Neustadt. Handelsschule. Albert Erbe 1902























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Old February 11th, 2016, 06:13 PM   #66
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[QUOTE=soren5en;130584053]Not a stately buildings but i hope you will turn a blind eye if i share some pictures here...

They are quite stately buildings, I think. Thanks for posting.
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Old February 12th, 2016, 01:13 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiaren View Post
Why don't post some interiors? They are just as interesting.

Neues Rathaus, Leipzig interior, an interesting blend of Jugendstil and neo-renaissance:

Neues Rathaus - (Town Hall) - Leipzig City Centre - Stadtzentrum by Mr Edd., on Flickr

Leipzig - Neues Rathaus by jaime.silva, on Flickr

Neues Rathaus by Nevernote, on Flickr

Neues Rathaus - (Town Hall) - Leipzig City Centre - Stadtzentrum by Mr Edd., on Flickr


source: Wipedia


source: Wikipedia
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I am wondering what structural system was used for the large span floors
as shown in the last picture ( conference hall?) in those stately classic palaces
in Europe? Before reinforced concrete was invented, how those large span
floors were constructed?
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Old February 12th, 2016, 03:39 PM   #68
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^ wooden beams, especially.
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Old February 12th, 2016, 04:21 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru.mircea View Post
^ wooden beams, especially.

Thanks, but I doubt about it. Look at those massive marble floors, stair
steps and balustrades. It is hard to imagine that wooden beams can carry
such heavy loads. Anyway, need to do more homework to figure it out.
At that time till early 20th Century, no engineered wood beams/girders
were available, is that right?

Last edited by BEE2; February 13th, 2016 at 12:48 AM.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 01:17 AM   #70
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Really impressed by those classic European architecture. I am
wondering who can recommend some books depicting the design,
construction and details of the classic stately masonry structures.

I would like to read such books that cover sections, plans, elevations
and construction details of the stately buildings.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 02:20 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BEE2 View Post
Thanks, but I doubt about it. Look at those massive marble floors, stair
steps and balustrades. It is hard to imagine that wooden beams can carry
such heavy loads. Anyway, need to do more homework to figure it out.
At that time till early 20th Century, no engineered wood beams/girders
were available, is that right?
But you only asked about the room in the last picture, the one with the decorated wooden ceiling. That ceiling surely has wood beams in it.

For other large, wide rooms that didn't use wood but stone or brick, vaulting was the most common solution.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 02:50 AM   #72
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yes, wood is extremely strong and when used in a beam grid and even as substrate to vaulting, it's features were the predecessor to the invention of corrugated paper/cardboard.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 04:42 AM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru.mircea View Post
But you only asked about the room in the last picture, the one with the decorated wooden ceiling. That ceiling surely has wood beams in it.

For other large, wide rooms that didn't use wood but stone or brick, vaulting was the most common solution.


What about those massive marble stairs??? What structural system were used
to carry such heavy loads? Wood as well?
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Old February 13th, 2016, 03:43 PM   #74
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Staircases are built on many massive pillars who cross through all the floors and rest on the foundation. I've highlighted all the visible pillars in the pic bellow. They take the wieght of the stairs and let it rest on the ground.

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Old February 13th, 2016, 07:42 PM   #75
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We've already talked about Hamburg's fabulous city hall in this thread. Yesterday the annual Matthiae Mahl (Matthew's Meal) was hosted in the city hall's gilded ceremonial hall, one of the world's grandest historical halls. Guests of honour were German Chancellor Angela Merkel and the British Prime Minister David Cameron.















Here the amazing event in time lapse:



@Bee2:
In the late 19th century steel and reinforced concrete were already widely used in building. Many of the buildings you see in this thread were build at the same time when the first tall skyscrapers in Chicago and New York were errected using the same methods and materials. So large and wide ceilings like in the ceremonial hall in Hamburg's city hall were no problem at all.
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Old February 14th, 2016, 03:40 AM   #76
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[QUOTE=alexandru.mircea;130691266]Staircases are built on many massive pillars who cross through all the floors and rest on the foundation. I've highlighted all the visible pillars in the pic bellow. They take the wieght of the stairs and let it rest on the ground.


Thank you for your explanation.
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Old February 14th, 2016, 11:02 PM   #77
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Dudes, they where using steel to accomplish those "wide" floors... and by the way, they already had Eisenbeton in use which is the predecessor of our modern reinforced concrete. So this is just regular construction and not a miracle at all...
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Old February 18th, 2016, 11:25 PM   #78
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Christiansborg Castle

The Source is http://oldcastiron.blogspot.com

Christiansborg Palace on Slotsholmen in central Copenhagen is the home of the Danish parliament, the Folketing, the Supreme Court and the Prime Minister. Moreover, the palace still houses several central institution of the Royal family, including the Royal Reception Rooms, the Palace Church and the Royal Stables.

The construction of the third Christiansborg began in the fall of 1906, some 20 years after the second was burned. It was built on the same foundation - and partly with the same outer walls - as the previous two castles.

The work progressed slowly, and in 1918 it was ready to house the parliament. The Supreme Court could be housed in 1919. The building was formally handed over to State december 16, 1927, but was then not yet finished. The king could take his reception rooms in use January 12, 1928, and thus the castle was officially considered finished.

There was, however, made further changes to the construction, in 1934 two extra crowns was added to the tower and in 1937 copper replaced the black tile roof.



Source: http://oldcastiron.blogspot.dk/2016/...ught-iron.html
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Old March 21st, 2016, 04:15 PM   #79
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The Museum of Communication in Berlin:

Built 1871-1874 by the architect Heinrich von Stephen as the Imperial Post Office. The Emperor was present at the inauguration and was especially pleased by it's "grandeur" and "dignity".

museum für kommunikation by Flavio Ensiki, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation Berlin by Heidi Kontkanen, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation by K.H.Reichert, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation by K.H.Reichert, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation by K.H.Reichert, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation, Berlin by Cornelli2010, on Flickr

gg by K.H.Reichert, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation by K.H.Reichert, on Flickr

Museum für Kommunikation by K.H.Reichert, on Flickr

Today one of the most famous stamps of the world is displayed there. The Blue Mauritius:
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Old September 11th, 2016, 08:02 PM   #80
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Madrid - Bank of Spain

Whereas the Bank of Spain was founded in 1782 by king Charles III, its current headquarters was built between 1884 and 1891. Although it has been expanded several times, I will only post some pictures of the oldest part.











Madrid - National Library and Museums Palace

This building houses both the National Library and the National Archaeological Museum. It was built between 1866 and 1892, its construction lasted so long due to quite a number of problems (1868 Revolution, Election of King Amadeo in 1870, Abdication of King Amadeo in 1873, First Spanish Republic 1873-74, Bourbon Restoration in 1874, Third Carlist War 1872-1876).

National Library
















National Archaeological Museum

The interior pictures are old ones since the Museum has recently been renovated.











Edit: I had to resize some pictures
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