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Old May 31st, 2007, 06:12 AM   #221
Chiman
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Love the dark blue and the contrast with the white, but I'm not loving the balconies.

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Old May 31st, 2007, 04:35 PM   #222
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^Are you kiddin'?! The balconies are the best part. I think it would be rather boring without the balconies defining the curtainwall like they do.
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Old June 2nd, 2007, 01:59 AM   #223
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this building is soulless.
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Old June 2nd, 2007, 03:52 AM   #224
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Quote:
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this building is soulless.
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Old June 2nd, 2007, 04:37 AM   #225
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Hey, Helmet: I'm curious to hear your Top 5 talls in the world as well as your 3 favorite present-day projects.
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Old June 2nd, 2007, 07:12 AM   #226
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Hello NittanyBLUE2002. Nice talking to you.

I honestly don't know the top 5 in the world. I like what I've been seeing from Richard Meier in his Philadelphia tower design. Norman Foster has a remarkable residential tower design for Vancouver tht just went on sale. Calatrava's New York "Townhouses in the Sky" is remarkable nd much better than the compromised Spire he's proposing for Chicago. Contemporaine may be the best High Rise in Chicago in the last 50 years.

For me it isn't about height and muscularity. It's about refinement and quality of the overall design.
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 07:01 AM   #227
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Quote:
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I like what I've been seeing from Richard Meier in his Philadelphia tower design. Norman Foster has a remarkable residential tower design for Vancouver tht just went on sale. Calatrava's New York "Townhouses in the Sky" is remarkable nd much better than the compromised Spire he's proposing for Chicago. Contemporaine may be the best High Rise in Chicago in the last 50 years.

For me it isn't about height and muscularity. It's about refinement and quality of the overall design.
Would you mind posting some pics of or links to these refined and well-designed structures, Lord Helmet? Thx.
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 04:14 PM   #228
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http://www.gizmag.com/go/3766/

http://www.jamesonfoster.com/

http://www.mandevilleplace.com/


hope these help. have a great day!
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 06:03 PM   #229
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Thanks for posting. I really like the one in Vancouver.

the Calatrava is great, too, but the concept of "townhouses in the sky" is DOA for me. Who likes townhomes? People who can't afford Starimasters? It's like living in a treehouse.

You couldn't pay me enough to live in Philly.

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Old June 3rd, 2007, 07:45 PM   #230
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Thanks for sharing. Personally, I see today's "starchitects" straining to stand out from the crowd by way of flamboyance. Such noncontextual structures can quickly lose their initial sensual impact only to appear quirky after much exposure--like a sustained smile that devolves into a grimace. What's wanting today is a school of architecture that would contextually express the spirit of a city and done with a "classic" timeless taste. Despite that shortcoming, I see Chicago's architecture as contextually restrained and so evermore definitive of this city's evolving urbanity. An architectural gestalt, if you will, such as defined in the Florence or Napoleonic Paris of earlier centuries.
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 08:26 PM   #231
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I think you're right. The problem is that historically, Chicago architects have been contextual - or as I like to call it, played it safe- in their own city!

Where would Chicago be without Le Baron Jenney, Mies, Khan, Gehry, KPF, Koolhaas, or Jahn to name a few?
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 09:34 PM   #232
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They are all very nice designs. However, it is worth noting their status, especially the first and the last. The first likely is dead since there has been zero interest in anyone buying a unit. And I have heard very little regarding Mandeville, so that too might not happen.
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 10:26 PM   #233
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The first likely is dead since there has been zero interest in anyone buying a unit.
Such a shame, too. 80 South Street is one my favorite proposals out there.
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Old June 3rd, 2007, 10:32 PM   #234
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Such a shame, too. 80 South Street is one my favorite proposals out there.
It is a cool design - but the monthly assessments would have to be just outrageous to maintain it, with so few units.
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Old June 4th, 2007, 06:24 AM   #235
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Quote:
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I think you're right. The problem is that historically, Chicago architects have been contextual - or as I like to call it, played it safe- in their own city!

Where would Chicago be without Le Baron Jenney, Mies, Khan, Gehry, KPF, Koolhaas, or Jahn to name a few?
Except for Mies, Chicago's architectural legacy derives in large part from its great architectural firms who have shown an fine understanding of our city's building tradition, not the occasional flamboyant "starchitect" like Gehry and Koolhaas. Pederson and Stone both studied Chicago's legacy and were delighted to be a part of it. Their buildings celebrate that tradition. Those cities whose architecture is thoughtfully contextual have the striking advantage of the added glory of gestalt.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 10:54 PM   #236
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Old June 30th, 2007, 04:25 PM   #237
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High-rise builders finding that debris recycling can pay off

http://www.suntimes.com/classifieds/...bris29.article

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CHICAGO CONSTRUCTION | High-rise builders finding that debris recycling can pay off


June 29, 2007
BY CRAIG BARNER Special to the Sun-Times

Quantities get pretty lofty in Bert Brandt's job.

Brandt, a senior project manager in Chicago for London-based commercial contractor Bovis Lend Lease Inc., is overseeing construction of the 340 on the Park condominium on Randolph Street. The 69-story high-rise north of Millennium Park will house 344 units and cost about $250 million to build. It will have taken almost three years to complete in December when work is expected to be done.

Another figure is prominent on the 340 project: Slightly more than 80 percent of the waste produced since the start of construction has been diverted from landfills for recycling.

"Initially, we were trying to get to 50 percent," Brandt said. "But we worked with [hauler and sorter] National Waste Services Inc. to come up with our recycling plan for the project, and we determined quickly that we were going to surpass the 50 percent milestone rather easily."
Through mid-April, 82 percent of the 3,509 tons of waste produced in the construction was diverted for recycling -- or about 2,870 tons. This includes concrete, metal, drywall, crates, pallets and corrugated boxes.

"Say you have 10 feet of a two-by-four, but only need 8 feet," he said. "Those 2 feet you don't need would have gotten thrown away in the past."


..........Recycling law and economics

But increasingly, construction professionals in Chicago are monitoring waste produced as part of the building process in part because of ordinances in the ever-more-green Windy City.
A law approved by the City Council in March 2006 required contractors seeking building permits to recycle 25 percent of construction and demolition (C&D) debris, said Sadhu Johnston, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Environment. In 2007 that figure went to 50 percent. The law reflects concerns about the environment and seeks to divert construction debris from landfills.

During the past year and a half, about 875 employees from the building trades have attended training sessions to learn about requirements, sorting and the recycling ethos.

Audits show the ordinance is getting through, Johnston said.

"Right now, from the reports we've gotten, we're at an extremely high recycling rate," he said. "The percentage we're getting reported back is over 90 percent."

For instance, 40 projects were completed in the city in April, producing 59,000 tons of construction debris. Of that, Johnston said about 57,000 tons were recycled -- or 97 percent.

The stunning results probably are explained by the fact that developers who recycle avoid tipping fees at landfills and also enjoy rising prices for recyclable scrap paid by processors.

Ken Dunn, a recycling activist since the late 1960s and director of the Resource Center, a nonprofit processor on the South Side, said prices for recyclable commodities "are near their all-time high with the exception of glass."

Steel scrap is selling for $220 a ton, said Robert Lenzini, owner of MBL Recycling, a processor of mixed construction debris in northwest suburban Palatine. In 2005, when he started the business, mills paid $140 a ton for steel.

"Your metals are your load that carries you," he added.

Another factor driving demand is the worldwide vigor in commercial construction, which has not mirrored the foundering market for single-family-home construction.


Greening the Windy City
Beyond the favorable economics, a number of other factors are driving C&D recycling in Chicago.
Perhaps foremost is Mayor Daley's positioning of Chicago as a leader in sustainability. His response is, in part, to voters who are concerned about the environment.

"We know that by keeping material out of landfills we will slow the filling of landfills," Johnston said. "We know we'll have somewhere to take materials in the years to come."

Solid waste from the East Coast -- which lacks landfill space -- is shipped to the Midwest, said William Turley, executive director of the Construction Materials Recycling Association, a national organization headquartered in west suburban Eola. Tipping fees on the East Coast range between $50 and $90 a ton, but in the Midwest they are only $30 to $40 a ton.

There's the added benefit that reducing construction debris will help lessen any future strain on landfill space and keep down costs for taxpayers.

Nationwide, the volume of construction debris exceeds that of municipal solid waste, Turley said. Construction debris is estimated at 350 tons a year versus 230 tons annually for municipal solid waste. Industrial waste is the other major component.

"A large part of the housing stock is concrete, metals and stuff like that, which are easily recyclable," he added.

In Chicago, the amount of construction debris produced is about 35 percent to 40 percent of total waste generated, Johnston said.

Consumers are increasingly environmentally conscious in their choices for transportation, household products and living space. Businesses are wising up to the trend and grabbing their share.

340 on the Park, for instance, is expected to receive a silver rating from LEED, the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green Building Rating System. 340 is meeting benchmarks on environmentally sustainable design and construction, Bovis' Brandt said. Most of the condo buyers are highly educated urban professionals.

"We do a lot of LEED documentation for people," MBL's Lenzini said. "More people are asking for that."

Markets are emerging in Chicago for closing the recycling loop via recycled products.

Just this spring Chicago-based Baum Development LLC announced the redevelopment of the former Frederick Cooper Lamp Co., a prominent building on Diversey Avenue seen daily by thousands of motorists on the Kennedy Expy. Plans call for it to house the Green Exchange, a showroom for eco-friendly products and services.

And, the commercial market is joining the recycling party. The CMRA's Turley applauds Chicago for buying recycled aggregate as a base product in road construction.

"The material can be made as well as -- if not better than -- natural aggregate in terms of engineering characteristics," he added. "The natural aggregate guys hate it when I say that, but it's true."

You don't need to convince some construction professionals, like Brandt, about the opportunities brought by recycling.

"Anything, generally, that could come to a construction site in some shape or fashion can leave a construction site for recycling," he said.

Craig Barner is a Chicago-based journalist, editor and writer.


ABCs of construction and demolition recycling
How does debris from construction and demolition sites in Chicago get recycled?
First, C&D debris is collected on the construction site, says Bert Brandt, senior project manager in Chicago for London-based commercial contractor Bovis Lend Lease Inc. Brandt is overseeing the construction of the 69-story 340 on the Park condominium project in the East Loop.

Tons of C&D are produced every day on the project, such as concrete, metal and drywall. Material is brought down mixed from the upper floors by crane and bucket, hoist or interior elevators.

"To the extent we can onsite, we'll sort it and try to classify it in bins," he says. Pick-up occurs daily, and the material is brought to a sorting center.

Ken Dunn, a recycling activist since the late 1960s and director of the Resource Center, a nonprofit processor on the South Side, is a proponent of sorting the debris on construction sites. Not all debris brought mixed in containers to a processing center could get sorted.

"They just dump in on a tipping floor and grab what they can," Dunn says. "You can pick some things off the top. Several things that should be recycled are under things you can't recycle."

Others counter that a lack of room on building sites precludes the placement of multiple containers. In addition, they say, trade workers are paid to construct buildings, not sort debris.

MBL Recycling, a 28,000-square-foot processor in northwest suburban Palatine, started in 2005 to sort mixed debris, says owner Robert Lenzini. The plant, which draws from communities within 15 miles, employs 18 workers for sorting and averages 400 tons a day.

After being dumped on the floor, debris is picked up by a backhoe, dropped and elevated by a conveyor and transferred to picking lines for separation.

"We have had several start-ups in the past few years of businesses that are able to take mixed debris," says William Turley, executive director of the Construction Materials Recycling Association, a national organization headquartered in west suburban Eola. "They're able to demolish a whole building, throw it in a roll-off and bring it somewhere to sort out and make a product out of it."

After being sorted, materials are sold to industry and reprocessed for another life.
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Old July 1st, 2007, 02:02 AM   #238
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This is great! Recycled wood is used for particle board, plywood, composite materials, and it is even cobbled together into new, smaller lumber stock using a dovetail join and a special epoxy adhesive that produces a stronger bond than that within the wood itself.

Recycled metal, obviously, is sold as scrap, melted, processed, and re-poured or rolled into new products.

Hell, if we can recycle 97% x 40% of Chicago's waste, then that means that Chicago is reducing its total waste by 38.8%, which is a HUGE number. I welcome further developments in the progress of Chicago towards being the world's most sustainable city.
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Old July 1st, 2007, 09:38 AM   #239
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Allright, let's finish this sucker already. I want to see it come to life with some light. I'm really looking forward to seeing what type night presence it will have.
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Old July 14th, 2007, 05:59 AM   #240
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Taken today:















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