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Old November 2nd, 2007, 04:02 PM   #221
cjfjapan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borninfarrington_g View Post
I have never heard another word about the office building...sorry! Tim Dora told the news this past weekend that financing should be complete on the museum/hotel this Friday (tomorrow) and they expect to begin construction Monday. I hope this is the case. The parking garage superstructure looks to be nearly done yesterday...haven't been down today. I will drive down tonight before I go to bed and verify if they are done. Also, look for "the largest crane in Indiana" to arrive at the former ISU lab school this week to begin lifting I-beams up to span the entire courtyard. It will have an enclosed two-story atrium. They have closed 7th-8th on Chestnut in preparation for this massive undertaking. I guestimate those beams to be at least 80-100 feet in length. Wish I could get off work to watch!
It would be great if you (or someone) could get some pics of the New Ed Building construction - I attended that school for several years.
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Old November 5th, 2007, 01:57 AM   #222
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The crane is there now...didn't get a chance to go there that night. It is MASSIVE! I was off a little on the beams. The biggest ones will be stood up in the courtyard with smaller ones making up the spance. The biggest pieces may occupy the crane through at least Thanksgiving and the top needs to be in place before the snow flies...if possible.
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Old November 6th, 2007, 04:37 PM   #223
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Second downtown hotel under construction soon

Work on downtown hotel could begin next week

Children’s Museum, Dora expected to close sale on land soon
By Arthur E. Foulkes
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Work could begin as early as next week on the new Candlewood Suites extended-stay hotel in downtown Terre Haute.

Dora Brothers Hospitality Corp. is expected to close the financing arrangements for the new hotel next Thursday, said Tim Dora, a co-owner of Dora Brothers Hospitality.

Once the financing is settled, construction will begin “as quickly as possible,” Dora said. “As of Thursday, the meter is running,” he said.

Construction of phase one of the Candlewood Suites should take about seven months to complete, Dora said. That initial construction phase will include 81 extended-stay suites in the gutted former Tribune Building, the former home of the Tribune-Star, between Seventh and Eighth streets on the south side of Wabash Avenue.

Once that phase is completed, four or five months will be needed to complete the second phase of the project, which will include a new building for the Terre Haute Children’s Museum and, above the museum, 16 to 18 more Candlewood Suites units, Dora said.

Dora Brothers and museum officials are expected to close on the sale of the land for the new Children’s Museum on Nov. 16, Dora said.

The Children’s Museum will pay Dora Brothers $400,000 for the land where the museum will stand at the corner of Eighth Street and Wabash Avenue, according to a Children’s Museum media statement issued late last year.

The museum will grant a vertical easement to Candlewood Suites for use of the suites that will be located above the museum, the media statement said.

Dora Brothers Hospitality also is the company that built the recently completed Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House hotel at Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue, across the street from the new Candlewood Suites project.

The Children’s Museum has been working to raise $4.8 million for the new 35,000-square-foot museum building. Nearly all the money necessary to build the new museum has been raised, a museum official said.

“To build everything, we’re just about there,” said Steve Schrohe, marketing coordinator for the museum’s board of directors. “We’re in pretty good shape.”

The museum’s fundraising efforts are only about $1.3 million shy of the $4.8 million target, Schrohe said. Part of the money raised, $1 million, will be placed in an endowment for the museum’s operating expenses, he said.

“I really think it will be a great attraction for downtown,” Dora said of the new Children’s Museum.

Of the $4.8 million raised by the museum, $1 million is set to come from the City of Terre Haute as a matching grant, according to the museum’s Web site. That grant will be funded through the city’s Economic Development Income Tax, the Web site said.



Arthur Foulkes can be reached at (812) 231-4232 or [email protected].
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Old November 7th, 2007, 02:45 AM   #224
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Back to the Model of Stagnation....!!!!!

This is bullshit. This stupid town dosn't want to improve. Pardon my rant as Bennett won. He doesn't strike me as forward thinking at all. So much for progress...and back to mediocrity. (*&^@(*&^[email protected]^!!!()@$*#%*()^&^_&*_)#&*+*#&%&()*W$*%()&@#$(*%&^#$_^#$()^
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Old November 7th, 2007, 05:22 AM   #225
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(D) Kevin Burke 5,947 49.55%

(R) Duke Bennett 6,054 50.45%

I hope Bennett will also attempt to revitalize the downtown like Burke has done and focus on the arts corridor, not sure if that will happen though. Seems like it's going to be a Republican upset in Indy as well.
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Old November 7th, 2007, 08:36 PM   #226
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As much as I liked what happened during Burke's term, much of it was in the hopper when he took office. Second, Burke was a Republican in reality, a Democrat in name only. I actually think that having a Republican mayor, and divided government, will be a GOOD thing for Terre Haute. Whether the new mayor is the best guy for the job, I'll trust the voters in TH on that one. I hope that he doesn't try to stop any of the progress made under Burke, and hope we can look back in four years and say that Bennett continued the progress that Burke accelerated.

Thanks Mayor Burke, for four good years - and here's to Mayor Bennett for another strong four years in TH.
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Old November 12th, 2007, 04:46 AM   #227
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Stephanie hits another nail on the head!

Wow, another great Selliken rip from the Steph:

Published: November 10, 2007 10:14 pm

Stephanie Salter: Notes from the underground of the conspiracy to control everything

By Stephanie Salter
The Tribune-Star


Oh, hi, everyone. I’ve just climbed out of Kevin Burke’s back pocket — or was I in Greg Gibson’s? — long enough to pack this column full of lies and half-truths that will further the evil plot to take over, um, Terre Haute.

Of course, I had to climb over everybody else at this newspaper (and two previous publishers) to get out of Kevin’s or Greg’s pocket because — as the really smart people in town know — the entire Tribune-Star staff is in on the plot and always has been.

Yes, sir, big conspiracies. Ya gotta believe!

They are so fun, and you hardly have to think to dive deep and really enjoy them.

Compared to a conspiracy, context is deadly dull. Conspiracy theories are a snap to feed. You needn’t look up, check out or track down a thing. Just repeat what you’ve heard, thought or read in an anonymous posting on a Web site or blog.

Imagination replaces research. Rumor replaces verification. Perception becomes reality. Why, it’s so easy, even a child can do it.

And the best part? Most conspiracy theories are based on what scientists call a “non-falsifiable hypothesis.” The proof lies in the fact that you can’t disprove it. Is that great or what?

You can say anything about anyone, make partners in crime of people who have never even met, and connect dots between events — real or imagined — with fearless abandon.

No matter how wide a stretch of rational thought, if it’s remotely possible, no one can prove it isn’t true, therefore it is. Such beauty.

So, another election has come and — pending a recount — gone in Terre Haute. Half the voters are reeling from shock and disappointment, and half are heady with success. This column is addressed to the first group.

(Why rain on the happy people’s parade? If Burke’s recount dice roll turns up snake eyes, the gap between winning a political race and running a city will appear to Bennett backers soon enough.)

(And why even stir the conspiracy lovers from their reverie? They know what they know. Nothing will convince them otherwise. I am in Kevin/Greg’s pocket because I can’t prove I’m not.)

The operative phrase for the shocked and disappointed among you: Focus on the numbers. Once certified, the numbers are the truth, such as humans can glean that sort of thing. They are your touchstone.

Before you utter a single generality — “What is wrong with this town?” — before you contemplate something really stupid — “I need to move some place that isn’t suicidal.” — look at the numbers and say them aloud.

Right now, before the recount, according to the Vigo County Clerk’s office, 6,055 people chose to change mayors, while 5,948 people chose to keep the one we’ve had for the past four years.

One-hundred and seven votes is not enough reason to give up on an entire city, all of its people, or the electoral process.

If you want to throw in the towel on Terre Haute, find another excuse. There’s no Target or St. Elmo steakhouse. Whatever. Create your own conspiracy theory, but don’t use 107 votes. That doesn’t even rise to the level of wimping out.

Along with the numbers, know this:

After Wednesday’s column, in which I shared my fact-check of just one of Dr. Joseph Selliken’s Democrats for Duke “news” stories, my phone and e-mail were filled with reader responses. Not one took me to task for the column. In fact, most people thanked me profusely and asked me to dig deeper.

Two questions emerged in nearly all the messages. The first was, “Why didn’t you print your column before the election instead of after?”

Well, I didn’t get a look inside a Ds-for-D four-part mailer until Sunday afternoon. First thing Monday, I began to try to verify the statements made in the first article that caught my eye on the front page of the mailer’s “Terre Haute News & Report.”

I have been in journalism since 1971. I have developed some fair investigative skills. That said, it took me all of Monday and most of Tuesday to run down the so-called facts in “Strip clubs in your front yard” in time for my regular Wednesday column.

I did find other errors and giant omissions while I was waiting for callbacks and the Internet to boot up. Some I mentioned, others I didn’t.

(Note to News & Report: Whatever some Terre Haute cops may call Chief George Ralston, the sheriff in “Blazing Saddles” was not Mongo. Mongo was the big, mouthbreather sidekick played by Alex Karras. The sheriff was played by Cleavon Little; his character’s name was Bart.)

(Second note to News & Report: The judge spells her name “Brugnaux,” not “Brugneaux.” Since she’s your next likely target for political death by rumor, innuendo and misinformation, you probably ought to get the spelling down.)

One of the messages I received about Wednesday’s column was from Rick Turriff, the owner of the 6th Avenue Gentleman’s Club. He provided details about potential and real effects of an adult-oriented business zoning amendment that passed the City Council, 9-0, in February before Mayor Burke signed it.

The details are interesting, but I haven’t the space to share here. (Call me.) All they do is confirm what I wrote: Turriff didn’t benefit a bit from the change because his club received an exemption from adult business zoning 30 years ago.

Oh, yeah, that “large cash donation” Selliken’s paper said Turriff donated to Burke’s campaign? The club owner says you can look it up, but it was $100 or $200. He doesn’t remember which, because he gave it to Burke’s first campaign, four years ago, not to this one.

Anyone with first-hand knowledge of other mistakes, misleading omissions — or confirmation of statements — made in the Ds-for-D mailer is welcome to send them my way. No rumors, no anonymous calls or letters. Facts.

The second question readers asked was, “Who is Dr. Joseph Selliken?”

I’ve wondered the same thing since I learned that he owns some of the most dismal-looking buildings on Wabash Avenue between Fifth and Seventh streets.

Public records tell us Joseph H. Selliken is a physician, the founder and president of the non-profit Osler Institute at 1400 Crossing Blvd. He owns PressTime Graphics (where all those Democrats for Duke mailers were cooked up), the aforementioned neglected buildings, the empty YMCA and, since March 2006, Pino’s Il Sonetto restaurant.

In June 2003, Selliken lost a case against a former employee (and cousin) in the 7th District U.S. Court of Appeals. In 1992, Joseph H. Selliken ran as an independent for U.S. Senate in Wisconsin (he got 0.1 percent of the vote). I am pretty sure this is the same Joseph H. Selliken as ours, but 100 percent verification is pending.

What makes the doctor tick, I haven’t a clue. You can read a lengthy letter to the editor from him today in Perspectives. My favorite line in it is about why Selliken decided to sacrifice his “prized privacy” and “write personal checks totaling over $40,000 for political air time” for Duke Bennett:

“I was buying time to give an excellent candidate with too much integrity to prostitute himself with fund raising pleas …”

The mind boggles. An adult man who chooses to enter a mayoral race should not have to sully himself with fund raising? The act of asking for campaign funds is synonymous with prostitution? Something a person with sufficient integrity would not do?

OK. That’s all the time I have today to devote to the vast evil conspiracy to take over Terre Haute. I must get back into Kevin’s or Greg’s pocket. I think Greg said he would give me his house. Or maybe Kevin said a house vote. It’s hard to hear in here — and it’s so crowded.

Stephanie Salter can be reached at (812) 231-4229 or [email protected].
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Old November 13th, 2007, 11:42 PM   #228
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Downtown Hilton developer interview

What struck me the most about this article was not the carnivorous, cannibalistic nature of Terre Haute culture, but that the new downtown Hilton came so close to not being built...I wonder what was the root of that doubt, and now about his reassurances for Candlewood.

Greg Gibson responds to accusations

By Mark Bennett
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — As a businessman involved in high-profile projects around Terre Haute, Greg Gibson says he accepts that some people will take issue with aspects of those ventures involving local government.

“I can respect somebody’s right to disagree and criticize projects,” Gibson said last week from his office on Haythorne Avenue, “so that doesn’t bother me so much. It comes with the territory.”

However, public criticism reached new territory for Gibson during this year’s Terre Haute mayoral campaign, as he saw it.

Political fliers mailed to households across the city on the weekend before the Nov. 6 election attacked not only the policies of incumbent Democratic Mayor Kevin Burke, but also claimed that projects such as the construction of two downtown hotels, the multimodal parking facility, the Terre Haute Children’s Museum, a $550,000 access road from Indiana 46 to a planned retail development owned by Gibson, and other ventures involved tax breaks for Gibson as political favors from the mayor.

Some of the unsigned stories in the fliers made other accusations about Gibson’s extended family and business associates.

The fliers were produced by a group called Democrats for Duke, whose members opposed Burke’s re-election bid and instead backed Republican challenger Duke Bennett. In the Nov. 6 election, Bennett won by a 107-vote margin, although Burke has since filed for a recount.

In an interview with the Tribune-Star last week, Bennett said he had no knowledge of the fliers’ content, and was not consulted about that in advance. Campaign mailings generated by Bennett himself did not include the accusatory language. “And I feel it’s unfortunate that … there were things in there that offended people, and there were things in there that I would never put in any, and that’s why it wasn’t in any of my literature,” Bennett said.

Dr. Joseph Selliken of the Democrats for Duke told Tribune-Star columnist Stephanie Salter last week that he was confident about the accuracy of that group’s fliers, and that he did not expect any of the accusations to be disproved.

But during an interview last week, Gibson strongly challenged the fliers’ assertions.

He was encouraged that Bennett disavowed any involvement in the content of the fliers, and Gibson said he welcomed the chance to talk with the mayor-elect.

Still, Gibson also expressed shock at becoming such a personal target in a political campaign. Perhaps the most jolting moment came months before Democrats for Duke had formed. During the primary season last spring, bumper stickers reading “Burke is Gibson’s b----” showed up on cars around the city.

“To think, my grandfather loved this community and the people in it. My dad chose to stay here when most other people were moving out,” Gibson said in response last week, “and to be treated like that is just unbelievable.”

His comments on a variety of topics follow below.

Portions are edited for content and length.

Mark Bennett can be reached at [email protected] or (812) 231-4377.

Interview with Greg Gibson

T-S: What’s your feeling about this election process and how you’ve been drawn into it?

GG: “Oh, I feel like I’ve been sucker-punched in the guts. I don’t see myself as a public figure, and I think it’s rotten, below the belt. And it’s all lies. I don’t sit around wringing my hands about it. I probably feel worse for my family than I do for myself.

“I get involved in some of these business deals that sometimes have a spotlight on them, and that’s my own fault. I certainly understand that people disagree, and I respect that. I respect the fact that people can disagree with those kind of things, but to do some of the things that this group of people did — to insult me and insult my family. I have two little kids. I’ve got a 4-year-old boy and a 1-year-old girl, and I think a lot about that. I know this kind of thing really bothers my wife. And none of them deserve that. So it bothers me quite a bit.”

T-S: Do you know or have you ever spoken with Joe Selliken, and is he someone you have any kind of background with?

GG: “I have no history with Joe Selliken. I don’t know him. I’ve never met him. To my knowledge, I’ve never been in the same room or the same place with him. I just recently in the last few days saw him on the news, and it’s the first time I’ve ever seen him. I don’t understand his motive in doing what he’s doing. I think that’s a great question. I think everybody ought to wonder why he’s willing to dump tens of thousands of dollars into a political race like this. …”

T-S: Do you know Duke Bennett, and if you could speak with him, what would you tell him?

GG: “I do know Duke. I’ve known him for quite a few years. I like him, to be honest. I think he’s a nice guy, and I think he’s an honest guy. Even back in 2003 [when Bennett first ran for mayor], I wouldn’t have thought the world was at an end if Duke Bennett was mayor, and I don’t today. I hope that Duke was not involved in any of these things. I’d like to think that he is being honest and says he knew nothing about the content and was not involved in any of those activities. But I suppose sometime in the near future, I plan to talk to Duke. I’m interested in hearing about his plans, and I’m interested in Terre Haute growing. I think we’re on a great path right now, and I hope he has plans to continue that.”

T-S: In terms of some of the topics that were frequently raised in that campaign literature, do you have any second thoughts about the use of EDIT (economic development income tax) funds to build the road by Indiana 46, looking back on it today?

GG: “I wouldn’t be telling the truth if I didn’t say there are days when I say, ‘Why do I subject myself to this kind of thing?’ And those have seemed to come more often lately. All these projects that are criticized in these fliers — the road on 46 — you know, I started accumulating property out on 46, 16 to 17 years ago. I felt like that was the next, natural place for retail development in Terre Haute. I accumulated that property over a long period of time. I carried it for a long time. And there was risk associated with that.

“The initial road that we built out there was a project that I worked on with the previous administration. With Judy Anderson’s administration, plans for that road were started. All Kevin Burke did was carry through what the previous administration had begun. And, sure, the city spent $550,000 on a road out there. I think it’s important for everybody to know that I actually gave the city over seven acres of property on which to put that road, and I felt like it was a joint deal, obviously to provide incentives for retailers to look at that area — and it worked. We now have a shopping plaza out there, and I’m very confident that things are going to grow from where we are today. And that money will quickly be paid back to the city in property-tax revenue. I think it was a great investment on the city’s part. So, no, I can’t say that I regret that.

“I think I could talk about each one of the projects this group is criticizing, and probably the main one is the Terre Haute House.”

T-S: Address that. You know what the accusations are about how the city money was used — explain what the average person may not understand.

GG: “First of all, I felt like the Terre Haute House was an anchor around the community’s neck. Ever since I began my business career, that thing has been a political football that has been kicked back and forth and debated. I was never of the opinion that we should use millions in tax dollars to remodel that old building. And I might add that most of the [renovation] projects that were presented were using 15 to 20 million dollars in tax money. Now there were some federal tax credits and things, but that was all tax money. And I did not believe that the people should spend that kind of money to rehab that hotel. And I thought it was a bad business deal; I don’t think it could’ve succeeded.

“I’m friends with Tony George [whose family had owned the old Terre Haute House], I’m friends with Curt Brighton [a Hulman family associate], and we had talked about the Terre Haute House periodically. And I one day realized, nobody else was going to do it. I just felt like somebody had to step up and do it. And I pitched it to them, and we started talking and trying to work out a business deal. I was worried about the publicity [from tearing it down]. And, believe me, there were many days during that process that I thought, ‘Oh, what have I done?’ You ask if there’s anything I might second guess — that would be the one thing, only because since that project it has shined a spotlight on everything I do. So that would be my only regret, but I do feel it was the best thing for the community.

“I know there’s all of these conspiracy theories out there, pretty much perpetuated by this group, that there was a deal in place and the mayor was involved, and it’s just absolutely not true. When the mayor took an option on the building to try to investigate proposals for remodeling, I thought that was the most ridiculous thing I’d ever heard. Why would he wade into this mess? I couldn’t believe it. And any talks I had previously had with the Hulman family were out the window. But when all of that fell apart, I went back to them, and I took that project on.

“I did not know Tim Dora [developer of the Hilton Garden Inn]. I’d never met him at that point. I knew that I might end up with an empty piece of property in downtown Terre Haute. But I felt strongly that building needed to come down, and we needed to quit spending so much time and energy discussing its fate. I just felt it was the best thing for the community. And I understand people disagree with that, and probably still do, even with the hotel we have there now. To be honest, there’s a little bit of luck involved. I met Tim Dora just by chance through Paul Thrift [co-owner of local building contracting firm Thompson Thrift Construction], and we started talking and we liked each other and got along great, and we still do. And that’s a big reason this thing progressed, just because Tim and I have such a good relationship. And, man, I’m proud of what’s there now.

“Back to the tax money, Tim went to the city and asked for a million-dollar contribution from the [downtown] TIF district funds. That TIF district was put in place by previous administrations. That money was sitting there to be used for downtown renovation projects — that’s what it was there for. And truly I believe, had the city not stepped up and helped make the deal happen, that hotel wouldn’t be there today.

“The deal was tough to put together. I mean, I was scared to death it was going to fall apart several times as were trying to put the hotel deal together. Even after it became public, it came very close to falling apart. And I fought and fought to save it, because I thought, wow, what a blow to the community after all we’ve been through and all the debate about tearing down the Terre Haute House and now the public knows about this new project. If it would fall apart, it would be punching Terre Haute in the guts, to use the phrase I used earlier. I’m thrilled that we got it put together.

“Yeah, there’s some TIF district money that went into making that project happen, but believe me, there’s [investor] risk there. And most of these developers that wanted to remodel the old Terre Haute House, they wanted the taxpayers to take the risk.”

T-S: The way the use of that TIF money was characterized in campaign literature was that it was a million-dollar check stuffed into your pocket by Mayor Burke. Can you address that?

GG: “That’s obviously not true at all. On the Hilton Garden Inn project, the city actually invested a million dollars in that project, but it was done in ways that conform to the rules of spending the TIF district money. And that involves excavation, sidewalks, those type of items that the money was spent on. And all of those projects had to be bid through the Department of Redevelopment. So the items that the money was spent on were actually publicly bid through the Department of Redevelopment. And they were all things that, per the TIF district rules, that the city was allowed to invest in to help make projects happen.

“So that’s what happened. This [Democrats for Duke] group seems to try to project that the mayor wheeled a wheelbarrow full of dollar bills down and dumped it in the hole at Seventh and Wabash, and that’s just not true.

“Another misconception, to move onto another project — the Candlewood Suites, [an extended-stay hotel], and the [adjoining] Children’s Museum across the street — you know they’ve portrayed that the mayor’s thrown a million dollars into that Candlewood project, and that’s simply not true at all. The city is just backing a one-million-dollar economic-revenue bond. And, first, the hotel project is responsible to pay that bond; second, it’s the investors personally; and, third, if all that falls apart, then the city would have to step up. The city is just an ultimate backstop, and it’s very, very unlikely the city would invest one actual dollar in that project.”

T-S: Can you characterize your involvement in the Children’s Museum project, and is any of that in jeopardy given all that’s been said through the campaign?

GG: “Things are going very well. I was a board member of the Children’s Museum long ago; I’m not today. And they’re a great group, and it’s a great project. And it’s another thing that all seems to fall in together. I think it’s great that the Children’s Museum is going to stay downtown and help with the renaissance of downtown Terre Haute.

“I’ve certainly been involved; I own the property, and I’ve certainly been involved in trying to put the deal together. And, no, it’s not in jeopardy. The Children’s Museum has done a fantastic job of fund-raising. They’ve got enough money raised to handle that building project. Things are moving forward with the hotel group and the closing on it, and I think construction will begin soon.

“I have to admit, when I saw these fliers, I thought maybe we should suspend things over there and maybe let the new administration take a look. And if they would like to kill this project over signing on to backstop a one-million-dollar bond … I think that would be crazy, but we seemed to receive so much criticism over a project that I think is fantastic for the community.

“But ultimately, it is so good. These guys can tell lies and throw out untruths about it, but, gosh, to bad-mouth a children’s museum just is amazing to me. But, yeah, I think it’s great. The Children’s Museum board has worked hard. I think it’s going to be a fantastic thing for us.”

T-S: As the campaign unfolded, it seemed to be clear that the Democratic Party was fractured. How do you view the state of the local Democratic Party and how that will affect the operation of the city and future elections?

GG: “It is certainly fractured. I don’t think there’s any doubt about that. … I’m simply amazed at what’s happening in the party. But I think it’s repairable, just as I thought that things in the city are repairable, and I think we’re on the road to getting that accomplished. I say that, but I don’t think it’s going to be easy, especially after things like these fliers are put out. When you hit below the belt and insult people and insult people personally, insult their families, I think it’s a lot harder to put things back together. It’s not like a clear and open political debate. It is a terrible thing. I think about that.

“In the primary, they came out with these bumper stickers which, I mean, is just horrible to me. I can’t believe having a bumper sticker with my family’s name along with an obscenity in it.”

T-S: Do you recall the first time you saw one of those [bumper stickers] and what your mindset was?

GG: “I couldn’t believe it. And honestly, my first thought was I felt bad for Kevin Burke. And, of course, as I got to thinking more about it, I got more upset about my name being in the thing. To think, my grandfather loved this community and the people in it. My dad chose to stay here when most other people were moving out, and to be treated like that is just unbelievable. And believe me I talked quite a bit about whether to try to pursue some legal action. But it’s a tough decision to make on whether to do that. When people … do those kinds of things, it’s hard to get down and not damage your own [reputation] by trying to fight them. Believe me, at times I thought, man, maybe we should fight fire with fire. But, gosh, I don’t want to stoop to their level. That would be the worst thing of all.”

T-S: Does it feel awkward that you’ve been drawn into the city elections, but you’re a county resident, not a city resident?

GG: “It does. [But] when I travel around the country and people ask me where I’m from, I say Terre Haute. That’s where I feel like I’m from.

“The regular criticism, I’m doing numerous projects, some of which the county or the city may be involved in. So I can respect somebody’s right to disagree and criticize projects, so that doesn’t bother me so much. It comes with the territory.

“I think there are a lot of people in the same boat. We have so many people that live outside the city limits that live a lot closer than me that don’t have a vote, and I believe that we should. I think Terre Haute needs to annex more property to really get all of the voters really involved in the future of the city.”

T-S: What have you heard from average people you’ve encountered over the last couple weeks around the election?

GG: “I’ve heard overwhelming support in regards to these types of things, and it’s really been appreciated and in some cases touching. I’ve had a lot of people tell me how awful it is and, ‘Please don’t let it bother you.’ Now, a lot of people would tell me this will have the reverse effect on the election. It’s hard to say what effect it did have on the election. Who knows? It’s a shame if this kind of thing can affect the election either way, whether it caused Kevin to get beat or whether it caused Duke to win, or the reverse. The fact that this stuff could influence an election in our town — and unless something happens or somebody does something, it’s looking like it’s going to continue in the future, which is a sad, sad thing.

“These people, they seem to target me and criticize me because I’ve had some business success and accumulated some wealth. I don’t see what’s wrong with that. Doesn’t everybody try to be successful? I’m a lucky guy. Gosh, my grandpa and my dad, what a great start they’ve given me. And I work hard to do things, and I enjoy it. I think that I’ve got the greatest job in the world. I work on different things every day, and I’m certainly a lucky guy. But I don’t think I ought to apologize for successful. And some of that success has been outside of Indiana, but yet I tend to try to work on projects in my hometown and I want to do things here. And, gosh, I think that’s pretty good. …”

T-S: What’s your inclination for your future involvement in city projects?

GG: “Believe me, there’s days when I think, ‘Why don’t I just go out west?’ It’s funny, I’ve had people call me from other towns and say, ‘Hey, why don’t you come down here? We’ve got some projects we’re interested in.’ A couple friends from Bloomington have called me, which makes me feel good. But ultimately I sometimes go home thinking, ‘Why do I do this?’ But I always wake up in the morning with a good attitude, and I think Terre Haute’s a great town with so much potential. Yeah, I’m going to continue working and continue thinking about ways to improve the town and, gosh, make money at the same time.”

“It really makes me sick that, here these guys [behind the campaign fliers] are successful in our community and they choose to use their wealth for despicable things like this. Why don’t they invest in a new business, a new project — something that will be great for Terre Haute and provide employment — or at the very least, give their money to a respectable charity, something that will help our community, instead of using it to tear the community down, and I think that’s what they’re doing.”

T-S: What would you say to the average person who only has an opinion of you through the rumor mill or some of these campaign fliers?

GG: “I guess I’d like to tell them I’m actually a pretty normal guy. Almost everything in that flier is just not true. And I really feel badly for the other people [Democrats for Duke have] attacked because they have some relationship with me. Like I said, I’m a lucky guy, but heck, I think I enjoy most of the same things [average people] do. I think those people want to see good things happen in Terre Haute. So do I. I’m just a normal guy who’s lucky enough to have the resources to go after some of those opportunities. And believe me, not all of them are successful. Those are the ones I’m always criticized about — the ones that are successful. The ones that turn out not to be so successful, I never hear a word about that.”

T-S: Perhaps not a lot of the charitable causes you’ve been involved in have had a lot of light shed on them. What are some of those that you’re involved in?

GG: “I’m certainly very involved in a lot of charitable causes in town. My dad was, and my grandfather was, and they always taught me that I needed to be. It’s part of my family’s philosophy, that you have to give back to the community you work in.

“I’m very involved with Rose-Hulman. I went to school there, and I’ve been on the board out there for several years. I love the school. I know it’s the best engineering school in the nation.

“I work a lot with the [Wabash Valley] Family Sports Center. I was a runner and a cross country runner, and we spent a lot of time developing those kids and senior citizens programs, as well as the cross country course and I think it’s doing great things for the community.

“And the last one is Hospice of the Wabash Valley. I’ve been involved in Hospice for 20 years. It’s hard for me to believe that. But I’m chairman of the Hospice board, and I think it’s doing great things for the community.”


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Old November 14th, 2007, 06:13 AM   #229
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I had heard a few of the issues. They had to have parking at 8th and Wabash which I believe contrdicts the downtown development guidelines. I believe they also had to acquire the lot at 7th and Cherry. Not sure what else.
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Old November 15th, 2007, 05:08 PM   #230
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City Park Improvements on Hold? Trail Extention continues...

Election puts Terre Haute skate park on hold
By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — A skate park’s future in Terre Haute will be determined by the mayoral administration in office next year, a city official said Wednesday.

The Terre Haute Parks and Recreation Department had planned for a skate park, a structure designed specifically for people to ride and perform skateboard stunts, to be built at Voorhees Park. Plans were being finalized, and funding had been secured for the project.

But then Republican Duke Bennett defeated incumbent Democrat Kevin Burke by 107 votes, based upon unofficial results released by the Vigo County Clerk’s Office on election night.

Bennett’s victory means that a new mayor will be in office when the project is expected to be built.

“Well, I would assume it would be up to the new administration,” Greg Ruark, superintendent of the Parks Department, said of the skate park’s fate.

Officials initially wanted to include the skate park as part of a $4 million capital improvements plan, which also included a new swimming pool to replace the aging neighborhood pools. The plan would’ve needed City Council approval, as a bond requiring additional tax revenue outside of the levy would have funded the measure.

Parks officials then tabled the capital improvements plan after most council members voiced a lack of support for the plan. But the skate park was one aspect that parks authorities wanted to continue.

Now, even that’s not for sure.

The skate park was delayed while the city secured the loan, which will be paid off through a line item in the Parks Department’s budget.

But the money budgeted was a little less than what was needed to cover a first phase of the park, which features two bowl-shaped structures for skaters.

Officials then sought possible volunteers for some work on the skate park to help lower the costs. While they had not received any commitments, they have received some interest, Ruark said.

It then appeared that the park would be created this spring, though Ruark said no contracts have been signed to ensure a date for a groundbreaking.

“You know, I think we were moving forward at a normal pace,” Ruark said. “I just don’t know where everything stands at this point.”

Bennett knows about the project through media reports. He said that he wants “to take a look at the total cost and the timeline and just kind of the overall Parks Department plan” before making a final decision on the project.

“ … I would need to get an update on things before I would make a decision,” Bennett said.

Not every plan is going to be on hold. Some parks workers this week were clearing the path for about a half-mile eastward extension of the National Road Heritage Trail, from Twigg Rest Area to Chamberlain Road.

The project should be completed by the end of the year, depending upon the weather, Ruark said.

“We’re hoping to pave it,” he said of the path. “That’s why we’re dependent upon the weather.”

Austin Arceo can be reached at (812) 231-4214 or [email protected].
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Old November 15th, 2007, 05:15 PM   #231
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A brief history of Terre Haute's Jewish population

Historical Perspective: Taking a look at Terre Haute and the Industrial Removal Office
By Mike McCormick
Special to the Tribune-Star

Little attention has been devoted by local historians to the impact the Industrial Removal Office had on the Jewish population in Indiana between 1904 and 1922.

Founded in New York City in 1901, the IRO directed the distribution and settlement of Jewish immigrants from metropolitan port cities on the eastern seaboard to communities in America’s interior. Terre Haute was among the 221 cities benefiting from the movement.

By 1901, Terre Haute already had a thriving Jewish population with two congregations, one Orthodox (Temple B’nai Abraham) and one Reform (Temple Israel). Lawyer Samuel Judah may have resided here briefly in 1816 before moving to Merom and Vincennes, but David H. Arnold was the first prominent Jewish merchant to settle permanently in Terre Haute. Arnold, and a few others, initiated a tradition of successful and honest merchants, tailors, professionals and community leaders.

Joseph Billingheimer, Bernard and John Kuppenheimer, Phillip Schloss, Leopold Goodman, Charles Alschuler, Joseph Gronauer, Max Joseph, Theodore Frank, Adolph Herz, Abraham Felsenthal, Dr. Leo Weinstein, David Goldman and the Levin brothers were among the prominent Jewish settlers in Vigo County before 1890.

Very active in “scientific charity work,” the Jewish community in Terre Haute was socially active. On June 8, 1868, the local chapter of the Independent Order of B’nai B’rith received its charter and, on Feb. 6, 1886, the Phoenix Club, a Jewish social organization, was founded.

The Phoenix Club became a community center which ultimately erected a building at Fifth and Walnut streets and then relocated east of the city at the former site of the Country Club of Terre Haute (now the site of Phoenix Hills subdivision).

Meanwhile, the ceaseless flow of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe was locating in the “Jewish Quarter” of New York City’s Lower East Side.

Due to this inordinate influx, the newcomers were forced to endure crowded, unsanitary conditions and were subjected to an escalated crime rate. There was concern that they could be easily swayed by radical philosophies such as socialism and communism.

IRO founders believed that cities in the South and Midwest with a Jewish population could better facilitate the Americanization of Jews, enhance their self-image and reduce anti-Semitism. Attorney David Bressler, a professional social worker, was hired to manage the New York IRO office from 1903 to 1916. He was assisted in his early years by Morris D. Waldman, a Reform rabbi. Fortuitously, Rabbi Emil Leipziger came to Terre Haute to head Temple Israel in 1900. At the time of his arrival, there were about 40 members of the congregation.

An extraordinary leader, Leipziger eventually also tended to the needs of 50 Jewish families in Danville, Ill., twice a month. A native of Stockholm, Sweden, he graduated from Hebrew Union College at age 23 in 1900, winning awards for scholarship and oratory. He stayed in Terre Haute until new Temple Israel was dedicated in 1911. Leipziger later became Rabbi of the Touro Synagogue in New Orleans and earned great esteem nationwide … Under his strong leadership, Temple Israel grew almost three times.

In 1904, the IRO hired a number of college-educated men to serve as “traveling agents” to establish local committees and investigate local employment opportunities. One of those young men was Elias Margolis, a Lithuanian-born graduate of Hebrew Union College. Margolis also had earned a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Margolis spent a couple of weeks in Terre Haute during April 1908 and, on April 27, dispatched a report to Bressler:

• The firm of R.L. Alder & Co. on Ohio St. needs “a highly-skilled paper-hanger, who is sufficiently conversant in the English language to understand orders and to make himself understood.” A native of Oxford, England, Alder came to Indiana after the Civil War at the insistence of Robert Buckell, a Terre Haute resident from 1866 to 1875 who became a six-term mayor of Oxford upon his return to his native country and was knighted. Margolis “suggested” the man you send to work “be meek and gentle in temperament because … I realized that only this type of man could be able to get along” with Alder.

• The firm of Thorman & Schloss on Wabash Ave. “desires the services of two coat makers … who have been employed by custom tailors in New York City,” not tailors for trade or clothing houses. Prospective employees must be able to turn out garments for the “swell trade” of the city and will be paid $20 to $25 a week.

• The large factories in Terre Haute, particularly in the iron and woodworking industries, were negatively affected by the recent financial depression. “I expect great results in the future from this missionary work.”

• The Frank Prox Co. will be able to use machinists and moulders in the near future. Mr. Herman Prox “promised to communicate with us in the future” so a letter “from you thanking him for his interest” would be a good idea. Margolis recommended Bressler send similar letters to Central Manufacturing Co. at Ninth and Walnut streets, who will be able “to use a good cabinet maker and some carpenters,” and Samuel Frank & Son, manufacturer of overalls at 508 Ohio St., who “might in the future be able to use cutters and pressers.”

• William H. Duncan, secretary of the Commercial Club of Terre Haute, “has intimate knowledge of the need for various workingmen” and “signified his willingness … to keep us informed … and to use his good will and influence to place our men.” Duncan and the Terre Haute citizenry “recognize the higher intelligence of the Russian Jew as a workingman and … I do not believe there is any anti-Semitic prejudice here, at least in industrial circles.”

Margolis closed by estimating the Jewish population at “500 souls, evenly divided between the Russian and the German.” The total population of the city “is 60,000 and growing.”

“I have formed a Removal Committee here,” Margolis reported, “with Rabbi Leipziger as Chairman and …the other members being Mr. Milton Herz, Mr. Harry Schloss, Mr. L.J. Goldstine and Mr. Augustus Goodman.” The IRO ceased operations in 1922 after Congress passed its first quota law in 1921, limiting immigration from southern and eastern Europe. Fortunately, IRO archives are retained by the American Jewish Historical Society.
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Old November 20th, 2007, 12:23 AM   #232
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Realtime webcam of Terre Haute:


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Old November 28th, 2007, 03:55 PM   #233
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Children’s Museum to break ground next week

Museum has just more than $1M to raise to reach its $4.8M goal

By Howard Greninger
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Within $200,000 of construction/exhibit costs, yet still $1 million from its $4.8 million goal, the Terre Haute Children’s Museum will break ground on Dec. 5 on its three-story building.

The museum paid about $400,000 for land and services from Dora Brothers Hospitality Corp., which is building the Candlewood Suites extended-stay hotel, west of the museum.

Transfer of property includes architectural and engineering design for the museum shell; utility connections to the museum’s building line; construction and use of two interior emergency stair towers; construction of the parking lot; perpetual maintenance for the parking lot; and the cost of half the roof for the museum building.

The museum will own the property on the corner of Eighth Street and Wabash Avenue and give a vertical easement for a portion of the Candlewood Suites, which Dora Brothers is building in the rehabilitated former Tribune Building and will be extended over the top of the museum.

The museum has raised about $3.6 million of its $4.8 million goal, said Steve Schrohe, marketing coordinator for the museum’s board of directors.

“That $4.8 million includes a $1 million endowment, so we are a couple hundred thousand short on paying for all construction and exhibits. However, we have got some pledges in and that will be updated on Dec. 5,” Schrohe said.

In addition, the museum will unveil a “grassroots fundraising effort that we think is going to be a big hit,” Schrohe said. “It is a way that the average person can participate in a very fun way to help us get the museum built.”

That funding effort will be announced Dec. 5, he said.

The museum’s shell will be constructed by Thompson Thrift Inc. of Terre Haute.

“We are in the situation where some of what we have been able to do has been dictated by the pace at which Dora Brothers could go, plus we wanted to know that we are very comfortable with our monetary position toward getting this built and getting exhibits in there,” Schrohe said.

“The public has responded very well and we are not done yet, but we have come a long way and between pledges and cash in hand, there is no reason why we can’t start building the facility,” he said.

Schrohe said the museum expects the majority of its exhibits will be rotated “to keep it fresh. We have done a lot of work to get into good relationships with other museums that have an interest in moving things around and other resources. We are well aware that you don’t want something that just sits there for years.

“That is why it is important that we finish out this fundraising effort” that includes a $1 million endowment to operate the museum, Schrohe said.

“We don’t want to put any future boards in any bind in their ability to keep things fresh and operating smoothly. That is why we still need that other $1 million to $1.2 million,” he said.

Howard Greninger can be reached at (812) 231-4204 or [email protected].
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Old November 29th, 2007, 12:16 AM   #234
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Great News!

Finally! It's happening!! I drove by today; they had just completed hanging up "Coming Soon" signs on the building. Sorry I haven't been around much; life has been crazy the past few weeks. New rumor/fact: Go check out the spray painted message on the old Paitson Bros. Hardware at 12th and 'Bash. A new building is on it's way! More good news for downtown TH!
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Old November 29th, 2007, 10:27 PM   #235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borninfarrington_g View Post
Finally! It's happening!! I drove by today; they had just completed hanging up "Coming Soon" signs on the building. Sorry I haven't been around much; life has been crazy the past few weeks. New rumor/fact: Go check out the spray painted message on the old Paitson Bros. Hardware at 12th and 'Bash. A new building is on it's way! More good news for downtown TH!

I was in TH over the Thxgvg break, and noticed the new Hilton Garden Inn sign on North 7th, and on the Wabash/8th street side of the building. Looks good, but I wish it said Terre Haute House as well...

The new parking garage looks great - and its BIG. I really like how it fills in the wall between the Indiana State Office Building and Hulman Center. The emerging festival grounds on the 8th/9th/Wabash/Cherry Block ("Terminal Block") is becoming the most urban space in the city. The completion of the new museum/hotel will help complete that space very, very nicely. Upgrading the other empty spaces either with temporary parkland would be a major asset to that area.

Any news about the new federal building behind St. Ben's?

I saw that there was an auction at the old Paitson Bros. building - any idea what's going in there? Those few blocks on the Central East Side have SUCH potential for a bar/entertainment district -especially if ISU ends up constructing a new football stadium to the north.

Other observations: the Union hospital excavation is complete; the new building will be HUGE. I really wish they could have respected the street grid, but the economics made sense. Those old, beautiful houses really arent worth much $$.

Downtown continues to look better - planters, new signs, Xmas decorations, all look great.

I'm anxious to see the new School of Education in my former stomping grounds of the Lab School.

All for now - please post pics! terrehautehouse.net has been so quiet lately....
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Old November 30th, 2007, 02:19 AM   #236
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yep...

I too wish it said Terre House somewhere. Somehow I knew it wouldn't.

The garage and the "Millionaire Square" do look great. It's exciting!

No news on new Fed bldg...

Word on the street is a dental complex with beautiful landscaping. I think the stadium will happen. Noticed more houses gone over there this weekend...and a poised bulldozer!

I'm happy about Union. Sad for the loss of some houses...not all. Pretty sure one of them was at the center of the local women's suffrage movement. Saw a pic of it on ebay. The house was knocked down last year.

The lab school plans look awesome. I don't know if I said this earlier, but I know "Mr. terrehautehouse.net" and "your wish is (already) his command." Earlier you posted that someone should post pics of the lab school work. He and his wife had already toured the building and shot over 100 images about a month ago. He said he was really sorry for the delay and that sometimes his real job keeps him too busy for regular updates. I think he did manage to get over to the press conference yesterday about the old Federal Bldg restoration. I'll have to ask how it went. I know he was kinda bummed about the election too.
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Old December 7th, 2007, 07:15 AM   #237
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Cost of renovating the Vigo County Courthouse hits $13M

Work expected to be completed in first half of next year
By Howard Greninger
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Originally estimated at $8 million to $8.5 million in 2002, the final cost for the interior renovation of the historic Vigo County Courthouse will be $13 million when work is completed in the first half of next year.

The Vigo County Building Corp. meets today to give its approval for the closing on the sale of $3.1 million in bonds to finish the project. The bond sale closing is expected next week.

The additional money is needed to complete renovations after some initial funds were diverted to other costs, which county commissioners say were unforeseen. The county paid $553,592 to have a temporary Superior Court Division 2 courtroom built in the county’s Community Corrections facility at the corner of First and Ohio streets, which opened in 2006.

That move allowed five other courtrooms to be rotated in the courthouse while renovation is completed.

Story continues: http://www.tribstar.com/local/local_...340235801.html
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Old December 7th, 2007, 07:18 AM   #238
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Children’s Museum breaks ground on new facility
By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Fifth-grader Emilee Roman visited the current Terre Haute Children’s Museum when she was in third grade.

She’s already had a historic experience with the new one, which isn’t even built.

Roman, a student at Terre Town Elementary School, was among the half dozen children who heaved shovels of dirt from the future museum site at the intersection of Eighth Street and Wabash Avenue. The groundbreaking for the new facility Wednesday came nearly a year after the project was officially announced last December.

“I like the idea [of a new museum] because the other one was really small,” Emilee said after the ceremony.

A new, 25,000-square-foot facility will replace the current 3,000-square-foot one a few blocks away on Wabash Avenue. Preliminary groundwork will begin within 10 days and exterior construction should begin by the end of January, said Bill Hann, capital campaign chairman for the project, during the groundbreaking ceremony. Interior work should start in early summer 2008, he said.

Complete story here: http://www.tribstar.com/news/local_story_339224410.html
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Old December 7th, 2007, 08:19 PM   #239
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This may be the beginning of a public push for a new football stadium on the east side of campus, one rumored for much of the year.

Published: December 07, 2007 12:07 am

Indiana State AD Prettyman: ‘Our facilities stink’

ISU considering investing in new outdoor athletics facility

By Sue Loughlin
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Indiana State University has a dilemma.

Should it spend up to $10 million on deferred maintenance costs at Memorial Stadium for a facility it doesn’t own that is nearly three miles from campus?

Or, should it invest that money in a new, multi-purpose, outdoor athletics facility that would be used for intercollegiate football, soccer and track/field?

Ron Prettyman, ISU athletics director, opts for the latter. On Thursday, he described his vision for a new multi-purpose facility, which would be located on campus and make it much more convenient for ISU students to attend football games.

He discussed athletic facility needs during a board of trustees seminar that focused on ISU intercollegiate athletics.

It’s not just Memorial Stadium that has serious deficiencies, he said. The outdoor track at Marks Field is built on unstable ground that must have regular, costly maintenance.

It keeps settling and shifting and gets sinkholes and surface depressions.

The ISU soccer field located across First Street has had similar problems, and one player last year stepped in a sinkhole and broke her leg.

Rather than pump an estimated $15 million into repairing/upgrading “three old, dilapidated facilities,” Prettyman proposed that funds instead be directed to a new multi-purpose sports facility that could last 40 to 50 years.

“It would create much more visibility on campus and it would be much more accessible to the student body,” he said in an interview after the seminar.

Such a facility also could be used for non-athletic events including outdoor concerts, movies or theater.

Prettyman also described a proposal for a new fieldhouse competition/practice facility. It could be used for both practice and competition by volleyball, indoor track and tennis; all other sports could use the facility for practice.

Now, several sports use the Health and Human Performance Building (ISU arena) for practice, and volleyball uses it for competition. That building is old and not in optimal shape for intercollegiate athletics, he said.

For example, volleyball has its competitive events in the south gym, which is not air-conditioned. Early in the season, temperatures can reach 90 degrees or higher.

One by one, Prettyman described the needs and inadequacies of many ISU sports facilities, which frequently rank near or at the bottom of Missouri Valley Conference coaches’ rankings.

“Our facilities stink,” he said during his presentation to trustees. His vision is to “get all the athletics facilities in a location where we can develop a Sycamore Experience” and showcase it to visitors, he said.

For many people, their only contact with ISU will be through intercollegiate sports, he said.

After the seminar, Prettyman emphasized that the two new buildings are a vision at this point. “There’s nothing on paper” and nothing has been approved, he said. He had no specifics as far as a location or timeline.

He believes there’s a commitment by the administration to take a look at the proposals and potentially include them in the university’s 20- to 25-year facility master plan now under development.

Prettyman believes a basic, multi-purpose facility for football, soccer and track/field could be built for about $15 million, although it probably would cost more “to do it nicely” — $5 million to $20 million more depending on what would be added.

The facilities would call for some private fundraising, he said.

After Prettyman’s presentation, Tom Ramey, vice president for student affairs, addressed the board of trustees.

“I want to stress that our athletics staff are realistic people” and the facility needs Prettyman outlined “are not something they expect to be solved in the immediate future,” Ramey said. “We’re realistic in understanding it’s going to take fundraising, creative financing and time.”

The first step is to get the proposed athletic facilities on ISU’s planning agenda, Ramey said. “We need to start working on this.”

Ramey also noted that “we are squeezing everything we can get out of our [athletic] facilities.”

Sue Loughlin can be reached at (812) 231-4235 or [email protected].
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Old December 8th, 2007, 07:46 PM   #240
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Mexican restaurant in nearby Greencastle closes. Oh dear.

12/5/2007 12:55:00 PM Email this article • Print this article
Deer carcass leads La Charreada to close

(Greencastle) Banner-Graphic
By MICHAEL ZENNIE, Banner Graphic Staff Writer

(Photo)
After five years in business, La Charreada closed its doors Sunday. The closure came after a sharp decline in sales that followed a surprise inspection in which the health department found employees butchering a deer carcass in the restaurant's kitchen during business hours, the eatery's landlord confirmed Tuesday.

Charlie Rodgers, the owner of the Shoppes of Greencastle, said La Charreada's owner, Socrates Montano, told him Monday that he had decided to shut down the Greencastle store and doesn't plan on returning to town.

On Oct. 24, health inspectors received a tip about a deer carcass in the kitchen. When they arrived, they found several employees crouched around the bloody piece of meat, according to the inspection report.

The Board of Health immediately shut down the restaurant for two days while employees cleaned the kitchen and threw out any food that might have been contaminated by the deer.

The health department placed the restaurant on probation for six months, during which time inspectors performed weekly checkups.

Inspectors have found no health code violations since the restaurant's closing. Previous reports, however, show a myriad of violations. The health department also shut down the restaurant once before.

Rodgers said the falloff in business after the closure was enough to that the La Charreada could not afford to stay open any longer, he said.

In an interview with the BannerGraphic in November, district manager Juan Valery said revenue dropped 65 to 70 percent since the deer carcass incident.

After the closure, the owner fired the manager and four employees who were involved in bringing the deer into the kitchen.

Valery also offered a public apology and underscored the company's position that the management was not at fault for the incident; employees acted independently and without the knowledge of supervisors, he said.

This, apparently, was not enough to lure customers back, however. The BannerGraphic learned Friday that La Charreada might close Sunday.

By Tuesday the restaurant has a hand-written paper sign taped to the door that simply said, "Closed."
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