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Old June 22nd, 2006, 05:08 AM   #61
choyak
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Well it is my original city, since I have been in cali for like 20 years. The downtown has been revitalized and is ongoing, getting office tower/ condos etc. Not to hijack the Terre Haute House thread, As for Wausau, the thread http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=265858
has it all.

I will agree it is alot better to build a 6 story hotel than a parking lot (argh), or as you stated a one story sprawlamatic 4000. I am wondering, in Terre Haute, I see quite a few older 6 or 7 story buildings. Hopefully they are not going to be destroyed,
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 03:12 PM   #62
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Thanks for the link--that thread is so busy I can't keep up with it.

Terre Haute still has many beautiful buildings, but many of them are surrounded by parking lots or really ugly suburb-o-crap.

There are very few good images of downtown Terre Haute though--



Some old pictures of extant downtown buildings:

Terre Haute Tribune building (now vacant)


Sycamore Building


Deming Hotel, now senior housing


Vigo County Courthouse



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Old June 23rd, 2006, 06:07 AM   #63
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Whoa that courthouse is COOL! Also, Sycamore Building is nice!!! The courthouse reminds me of ...... Manitowoc courthouse


The one in Terre Haute has a better roof, I like the mansard roof
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Old June 23rd, 2006, 08:36 AM   #64
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Thanks--the courthouse is probably the most beautiful building in the city, although some of the churches at St. Mary's outside of town are amazing too.

The Vigo County Courthouse was clearly built when leaders imagined a much bigger and brighter future for Terre Haute, was (here's a piece of very nerdy trivia) the 76th largest city in the US when this building was completed in 1880. If it had maintained that ranking, it would be around the size of the cities of Lexington, KY/Lincoln, NE, or the metro areas of Syracuse NY/Toledo OH.

And end to the coal mines and Prohibition stunted the city's growth early in the 1900s, and it never really grew much after that.
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Old July 2nd, 2006, 01:17 PM   #65
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From terrehautehouse.net:

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Old July 3rd, 2006, 03:31 AM   #66
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Sorry but Wausau had sort of a travesty also in the late 70s I think


The one on the left is the earlier one I posted viewed from east side instead of north side, the one on the right was built to replace a building similar to the one on the left. I was too little at the time to really remember though!!!

Wausau also had this, and it is destroyed. I guess Wausau had morons in charge in the past
It was built in 1900, no less. If this Court House was still there, it would definately be in national register of historical whatever it is. I just dug online and saw this and remembered it. I am now depressed. I hope the beautiful Court House in Terre Haute will stay there.

It was replaced with this

I have just vomited and completely filled my living room with vomit.
The rendering of the hotel looks weird like it is in the countryside instead of downtown, like they did not bother to paint the surrounding buildings. The hotel building however looks OK, not as nice as the one destroyed by far, but a lot better compromise than a surface parking lot!!

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Old July 3rd, 2006, 06:09 AM   #67
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choyak,
That's quite a shame about the courthouse in Wausau.

I had an interesting architectural experience last week when I was in Tokyo (I live in Japan)--I visited what I thought was a very old temple in the center of Tokyo, but it turns out it was reconstructed in 1973--like many old temples, it burned down, but was rebuilt almost exactly as it had been before.

I don't always mourn when old buildings are torn down--sometimes the replacements can be much more functional and beautiful, though in the case you presented, the scale of the old building was certainly more human.

Here is a small shot of how the new Terre Haute House will probably look in context. Im still waiting to see other renderings of it. While I miss the old building, like you said, Im happy that a functioning hotel will be built on the corner.

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Old July 25th, 2006, 06:37 AM   #68
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Officials commemorate Hilton groundbreaking
By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

Saratoga Restaurant owner George Azar remembers how his restaurant’s hours changed after department stores left downtown Terre Haute, taking some of his customers with them.

Now he hopes more business might be just a summer away.

Azar, who also is City Council president, grasped a shovel in his hands late Monday morning as he and other prominent officials symbolically dug into the earth at the site of the old Terre Haute House to mark the beginning of construction for a new hotel they anticipate will add to downtown business.

“Unfortunately the foot traffic isn’t there right now,” said Azar, who owns the Saratoga at Fifth Street and Wabash Avenue with his wife, Cathy. “Hopefully this will bring them in.”

The new hotel is expected to be completed in about a year and will have 109 rooms, including four suites and feature an indoor heated pool and fitness center. Local firm Thompson Thrift Construction Inc. will build the new hotel, which is expected to cost at least $11 million.

“My entire career this corner has been talked about, and we’re excited just to be a part of it,” said Paul Thrift, co-owner of Thompson Thrift.

People have worked for longer than a decade to revitalize the site, said Terre Haute Mayor Kevin Burke.

Past proposals included renovations of the old Terre Haute House, which was demolished to make way for the Hilton Garden Inn.

“The people of Terre Haute need this,” Burke said at the ceremony. “They’ve waited long enough.”

The city committed $1 million to the project, which facilitated the decision to build the project at the site at Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue, said Tim Dora, who is part of companies that will own and manage the hotel.

“So really, cities like this kind, have to make it happen,” he said of the development.

The Hilton Garden Inn will be a four-star hotel with rooms costing near $119 to $129 per night, Dora said in a previous interview.

Once built, the hotel will add between 40 and 45 full-time jobs, along with other part-time jobs, Dora said Monday. He added that he hopes to work out an agreement with Indiana State University to help students fill some of the part-time positions and receive “real Hilton training.”

ISU President Lloyd Benjamin, who witnessed the ceremony, said a partnership between the university and the hotel is possible, though he noted it could contain a variety of possibilities.

“Well I think [the hotel] has multiple benefits for Indiana State,” Benjamin said. “I expect that we will be hosting some events in the hotel.”

Many people are hoping for positive results. Azar kept the shovel he used at the site, which he said he will hang up in the Saratoga.

“I just think it’ll be a nice reminder to a new start to downtown,” he said.

Austin Arceo can be reached at (812) 231-4214 or [email protected].
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Old November 23rd, 2006, 06:27 PM   #69
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Old November 23rd, 2006, 06:50 PM   #70
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Two beautiful buildings on Ninth Street in Terre Haute

St. Benedict's Church
the large central dome was lost in a fire about eighty years ago



Today:





Hulman and Co headquarters (makers of Clabber Girl Baking Powder, and owners of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway)

Grand Opening, 1892


1930:


1960:


Recent Picture:
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Old November 25th, 2006, 01:44 PM   #71
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It's a little funny to me to hear the local press describe Terre Haute as "booming" when the majority of the evidence is the invasion of chain stores: a second Wal-Mart, a new Bob Evans "Resturnt" as the locals are wont to grunt. There have been other significant developments in the economy, though: An expansion of the Clabber Girl Factory downtown; the new downtown Hilton Garden Inn, and industrial investments. The article claims nearly $2 billion in recent investments in the metropolitan area. I hope this isn't just a flash in the pan before the city goes back to sleep for another generation.


From ethanol to bricks, major investments are a public matter

By Arthur E. Foulkes
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE— A recent flurry of public and private investment in Terre Haute and the Wabash Valley has business and government leaders optimistic this Thanksgiving.
“I don’t recall … a time in our history when we’ve seen this significant of investment in our community,” said Rod Henry, president of the Greater Terre Haute Chamber of Commerce. Henry estimates around $2 billion recently has been or soon will be invested in the Terre Haute area.
The optimism isn’t confined to the city or Vigo County. There are new investment projects taking root all over the Wabash Valley.
“The outlook is good right now for a lot of places,” said Jim Coffenberry, economic development professional for the West Central Indiana Economic Development District (WCIEDD), which covers Parke, Putnam, Clay, Vermillion, Sullivan and Vigo counties.
He points to a number of new investment projects around the Valley, including prospects for several ethanol plants and major new investments in Sullivan and Clay counties.
“I’ve been doing a whole lot of work lately,” Coffenberry said.
But there may be more to the picture than the overall investment figures indicate. Some of the spending is public, meaning it is paid for by tax dollars that otherwise would have been spent or invested privately. Some of the investment is a public-private mix, such as the ethanol projects, where again the net benefits may be less than what appears. Even much of the private investment has a public side in the form of tax abatements or public financial assistance, again, making the net gains to overall living standards difficult to discern.

Now we’re cookin’ with corn

Ethanol plants are presently a big part of the economic investment picture in Indiana and the Wabash Valley. While Gov. Mitch Daniels has lamented that Indiana — despite being the fifth-largest corn producing state — only recently got into the ethanol game in a big way, the state has since made up ground. In 2005 and the first half of 2006, a dozen new ethanol plants were unveiled for Indiana. Additionally, there are plans for “24 [new plants] on the drawing board [for Indiana] right now,” according to West Central’s Coffenberry, “and there could be as many as 42 in a couple of years.”
Sullivan County soon could be home to two ethanol plants. U.S. Ethanol is expected to build a $180-million plant near Shelburn next year, employing between 60 and 65 people. Construction of the plant, which is expected to produce 100 million gallons of ethanol per year, will require several hundred employees, Coffenberry said.
A second company is expected to announce plans for another ethanol project in that county by the end of this month, Coffenberry said. He added that Vermillion County and Putnam County each have ethanol plants planned for the near future, near Cayuga and Cloverdale, respectively.
But not everyone sees ethanol, which is basically corn alcohol that can be used as a fuel, as an economic plus, at least not for the broader population. While it may well help corn farmers, its costs and benefits for others are a matter of debate.
“Without [government subsidies], the ethanol industry would collapse to dust. Nobody would make ethanol,” said Jerry Taylor, an economist with the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., who is just completing a lengthy study of the ethanol industry. He calculates the ethanol industry receives $5 billion to $6 billion annually in government subsidies and, even so, the fuel costs around $2.50 per gallon, making it “far more expensive than conventional gasoline.” Taylor also disputes that ethanol production could reduce American “dependence” on foreign oil, and points out that while ethanol may reduce some greenhouse gases, it does so “at a ridiculously exorbitant cost” and contains other pollutants that are more of a problem at present, such as nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons.
Others, such as Michael Maurer, Indiana’s secretary of commerce and president of the Indiana Economic Development Corp., see ethanol as “a big win for Hoosiers.” Ethanol plants “add jobs, bring new opportunities for Hoosier farmers and create a renewable fuel that reduces our dependence on foreign fossil fuels,” Maurer said in a recent press release from Renewable Agriculture Energy Inc., the Colorado-based ethanol company planning to build a $150-million ethanol plant near Cayuga. The Cayuga facility is expected to employ 45 people once it is up and running and to produce 100 million gallons of ethanol per year, according to the company press release. Construction will require 16-20 months, the company said.
In neighboring Illinois, Midwest Bio Management, an Indianapolis-based firm, has announced plans to build a $185-million ethanol plant near Casey. The plant is expected to employ 40 to 50 full-time workers and produce 100 million gallons of ethanol per year, according to Bob Brown, president of Casey Industries.

Investments in clay

Apart from corn, clay is making a resurgence as an important natural resource for the Wabash Valley. Natural clay in the soil has drawn at least two new brick-making facilities to the area in recent months.
Boral Brick, an Australian-based multinational corporation, broke ground on a $55-million brick plant in Pierson Township in southern Vigo County early this month and Brampton Brick, based in Canada, is finalizing plans this week for a $41-million plant near Farmersburg in Sullivan County. Brampton’s plant will employ 27 full-time workers earning between $30,000 and $40,000 annually, WCIEDD’s Coffenberry said. Boral Brick’s plant in Vigo County is expected to employ more than 50 full-time workers.
The brick and ethanol plants also will create work opportunities in transportation services since both products must be transported by truck or rail. Ethanol cannot be shipped through pipelines because of “its ability to absorb water and cause pipeline corrosion,” according to a paper published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service.
“Our natural resources are benefiting us in a big way,” said Marilyn Salesman, vice president of the Sullivan County Council.

Other investments

Vigo County, the most populous of the Wabash Valley counties, has gotten the lion’s share of the recent investment boom. Union Hospital’s $178-million investment in a new hospital is “the largest investment in the history of the City of Terre Haute,” the Chamber’s Henry said. He also pointed to the recent Hulman Street renovation project, saying it is the largest infrastructure project in the city’s history.
Other major area investments include Pfizer’s $330-million outlay for making and distributing its new insulin drug, Exubera; Sony DADC’s $162 million for Blue-Ray disc operations; steel company CSN’s $50-million expansion project; CertainTeed Corp.’s $70-million production facility for building products; and Aisin Brake & Chassis’s $35-million plant expansion.
“It’s been a busy year,” said Steve Witt, the president of the Terre Haute Economic Development Corp. The THEDC was involved in many of the investment projects in the area, in many cases assisting companies receive tax abatements or other government-provided incentives.
“We looked at probably 70 potential sites,” said Archie Kappel, director of operations for Aisin Brake & Chassis. Eventually his company, which has headquarters in Japan, selected Terre Haute for its recent expansion because of the city’s favorable business climate, its workforce, its infrastructure, access to highways, the Vigo County Industrial Park, cost of living and “very good support system of schools and universities.
“The [Terre Haute] community is a very strong supporter of business,” Kappel said, “as is the local government.” He added that “Terre Haute has a … very strong economic development group with Steve Witt and the business community.
“Doing business in Terre Haute has been very good for Aisin,” Kappel said.

Battling for and about incentives

Nearly all the companies that recently have expanded or located in Terre Haute applied for and were granted some sort of tax break or other economic incentive.
The Sullivan County Council voted last month to give a 10-year tax abatement to Brampton Brick while the Vigo County Council granted a similar abatement to Boral Brick. Other incentives companies have received include a $450,000 training grant and $8.5 million in tax credits from the state Economic Development Corp. for Pfizer along with a tax abatement from Vigo County. Abatements also recently have been granted to Black Dog Ranch, a Colorado-based roofing materials company that plans to invest around $5 million in a Terre Haute plant, and Lenex Steel Corp., which also is investing millions in a new Terre Haute operation. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. offered $160,000 in training grants to CertainTeed, up to $287,500 in infrastructure assistance and up to $2.25 million in tax credits. Vigo County offered the company 115 acres in the county industrial park for 99 cents an acre plus an $875,000 railroad extension paid for with tax dollars.
“Economic development officials and politicians never consider the unseen [costs of such incentives],” said Michael LaFaive of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy in Midland, Mich. LaFaive, who just completed a 126-page study on Michigan’s statewide economic development program, calls economic incentive packages “political development programs, not economic ones.” Incentives allow politicians and officials to “appear as if they have created jobs … when what they have actually created are job announcements,” LaFaive said. He and other researchers have found that areas that offer few abatements and where taxes are low across the board do better economically than areas with higher taxes that offer frequent tax abatements, he said.
Terre Haute City Councilman Ryan Cummins, R-2nd, a longtime opponent of tax abatements and other government-provided incentives to business, agrees. Abatements create a greater tax burden for other taxpayers while things like Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and other more direct financial incentives force existing businesses to subsidize their competition, he said. Cummins also doesn’t buy the argument that incentives affect company decisions on where to locate.
“We have given abatements for projects that were already well under way or even completed,” Cummins said. “We approved an abatement for DADC even when the [company] representative said the only other location they were considering had … higher costs in terms of labor, utilities and [regulations].”
Companies tend to choose their locations first “then go shopping for economic icing on their location cake,” LaFaive said.
“I don’t buy the argument that [abatements] create an additional expense for the other taxpayers,” THEDC’s Witt said. “Your tax rate is a function of your total assessed value and your levy, so the more assessed value we can get on the books … it’s going to cause people’s tax rates to go down or at least stay the same,” Witt said.
“Where would we be … today if we didn’t have the assessed value of the DADCs and the Pfizers because of tax abatements and incentives that were given 10 or 20 years ago?” Witt asked.
Gov. Daniels, speaking in Terre Haute last month, said the state government can facilitate economic development by creating a positive business atmosphere, marketing the state, reducing burdensome regulations and, he added, offering financial incentives. But, Daniels said, financial incentives are his lowest priority in economic development.
“I like to put [incentives] at the end of the list,” Daniels said, “because those have a cost, namely to other taxpayers.”

Attitude and gratitude

Disagreements aside, one thing appears certain this Thanksgiving: There is a sense of optimism in the air and the Wabash Valley is seeing new public and private investment at a level economic development professionals are calling significant.
There is a new “attitude” in Terre Haute, the Chamber’s Henry said. “I have never seen Terre Haute more positive about where we are today and where we are going,” he said. “There has been a sharp upswing.”
“We’re all feeling pretty good” about new development prospects in Sullivan County, Councilwoman Salesman said. “We have a lot of good people who would like jobs or better jobs,” she said. Sullivan County, like its neighboring counties, has an unemployment rate above the state average and well above the national average. Sullivan County’s unemployment rate is more than 7 percent. Vigo County’s is 6.8 percent and Indiana’s is 5.4 percent. Nationally the rate was 4.4 percent in October.
But this may be changing radically. According to Coffenberry, there has been more investment announced for Sullivan County alone in the past month than in the previous 20 or 30 years.
“I think there’s going to be a lot of people that are going to be thankful for it,” Coffenberry said. “It could get really interesting.”
Arthur Foulkes can be reached at (812) 231-4232 or [email protected].
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Old November 25th, 2006, 01:48 PM   #72
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More economic news...

Upgrades at area hospitals impact health, economy
Howard Greninger
The Tribune-Star

Current and soon-to-be expansion projects at medical facilities in Terre Haute likely will have a strong impact on the city’s economy during the next two years.

Both Terre Haute Regional Hospital and Union Hospital are expanding and investing in new facilities.

On the city’s south side, Terre Haute Regional Hospital plans to construct a new $6-million Medical Office Building, containing about 50,000-square-feet. The new building, still under design, is scheduled to be constructed on the hospital’s campus in mid 2007, said hospital spokeswoman Meredith Swaby.

The three to four-story building will “offer more office space to physicians as well as housing physical therapy and other services,” Swaby said.

Regional Hospital in 2003 finished a $41 million renovation of its Emergency Room, Intensive Care Unit and Outpatient services.

In December, Regional Hospital will stage a grand opening for its new Wound Care Center, a $270,000 project that will offer treatment to patients who have non-healing wounds, caused by inadequate circulation, poorly functioning veins and immobility, symptoms most frequently found in people with diabetes.

The center will use Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy to accelerate healing.

The hospital is adding seven full-time employees at the center, which initially will contain two hyperbaric oxygen chambers. The center has capacity to add a third chamber. The chambers allow a patient to breathe 100 percent oxygen in a pressurized chamber to assist in the healing process of wounds.

“If you save a limb, you save a life,” Swaby said. “Sixty percent of amputees, people who had a hand or limb cut off because of non-healing wounds from diabetic complications, die within the first five years. When you are talking about an aging population like we have, this is very important because it reduces the death rate. It will be a brand new service for the Wabash Valley.

“A physician can refer a patient to the center. It is an added resource for physicians to utilize as well,” Swaby said.

Union Hospital also is opening a wound healing center. Union’s facility will open Jan. 15 on the fourth floor of its Professional Office Building, 1520 N. Seventh St. The center will introduce Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy about a month after it opens. The hospital signed an agreement with Florida-based management firm National Healing Corp. to establish the wound healing center.

Regional upgrades technology and equipment

Since 2004, Regional Hospital has been spending money on new technology and equipment, spending more than $2 million in 2004; $3.87 million in 2005; and more than $1.92 million this year.

In 2005, the hospital made upgrades to its cardiac catheterization lab and replaced all its beds with high-tech “Hill-Ron” beds. The hospital also opened a new in-patient rehabilitation unit for physical rehabilitation for care such as knee replacement or recovery from a stroke. That unit added 13 employees to the hospital.

Investment this year includes a second-generation Stryker high-definition camera used in surgeries such as arthroscopy, laparoscopy and cystoscopy. “It allows physicians to get a much clearer picture for certain kinds of surgeries” that require only small incisions in the patient to perform the operation, Swaby said.

Also, the hospital invested more than $204,000 for smart IV pumps, which will be fully in use by mid-December. “It helps in controlling the dispensing of medications. It is an another layer of protection against medication error,” Swaby said.

The hospital this year also renovated its sleep lab, adding two employees and has invested $500,000 for a Picture Archiving Communication System or (PACS) that allows physicians to quickly review a patient’s images and reports at the hospital, their office or at home. That system will be fully functional in 2007, Swaby said.

Regional Hospital employs 894 workers, with 720 full-time equivalents, with an annual payroll of more than $33.2 million, plus more than $8.1 million in benefits. The hospital this year paid $928,877 in property taxes and $101,277 in sales taxes.

Union Hospital adding facilities,

medical services

The largest expansion is ongoing at Union Hospital on the city’s north side.

A new central energy power plant addition and renovation is under way at 1606 N. Seventh St. The plant is on the south side of Beech Street at the intersection of Seventh Street, on the north side of the hospital.

The addition will use natural gas and house steam boilers and heating/ventilation/air-conditioning systems. The nearly 11,000-square-foot, two-story addition is a $10-million project, scheduled for completion in summer 2007, said Kristi Roshel, hospital spokeswoman.

Ground was broken last summer on the Hux Cancer Center, a $15-million, three-story, 70,000-square-foot project scheduled for completion in January 2008. The comprehensive cancer center combines the hospital’s cancer treatment under one roof, including radiation therapy, medical oncologists, diagnostic imaging including PET and CT scans and support services for cancer patients.

That center is also on the north side of the hospital, on the north side of Beech street at the intersection of Seventh Street.

Union Hospital, in partnership with AP&S, soon will dedicate the new Wabash Valley Surgery Center, at 1421 N. Seventh St. The center will open in the first week of December, with an open house planned for Nov. 30.

The 28,000-square-foot center will be managed by AP&S surgeons, who will practice an estimated 11,000 surgical cases per year at the center, up from about 6,500 surgical cases. The center will have eight operating rooms and four procedure rooms. That project is a $10-million investment by Union Hospital, which will own the facility.

The hospital’s largest project is a $178-million construction project to build a six-story, 350-private bed, 575,000-square-foot new hospital, possibly adding 200 new jobs, Roshel said. That project is scheduled to start next summer and take two years to construct.

That $178-million investment is projected to make a nearly $2.45-billion impact on the Wabash Valley economy over 10 years, hospital officials said. Much of that is annual payments to vendors and suppliers of the hospital.

Union Hospital employs 1,971 workers, with about 1,700 full-time employees, with an annual payroll of more than $85 million. That annual payroll is about $110 million with benefits. The hospital pays nearly $400,000 in property taxes, with $362,000 of that paid in Vigo County.

Some other investment this year from medical facilities include a nearly $4-million project at the Providence Medical Group at 2723 S. Seventh St. Construction is under way on a 33,000-square-foot addition for a diagnostic and oncology center. The addition, to be completed next summer, will add 40 workers at an annual salary of $2.8 million. The facility prior to the addition employs 270 workers at an annual salary of $7 million.

Howard Greninger can be reached at (812) 231-4204 or [email protected].
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Old November 25th, 2006, 01:54 PM   #73
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Retail Growth

No Tiffany's or even Nordstrom; just a craptacular parade of mid-level retail.

Retail keeps coming to Terre Haute market

Second Bob Evans, Steak-n-Shake, Wal-Mart and two more hotels among newest arrivals
By Howard Greninger
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — In the past three years, about $100 million has been invested in new retail business in Vigo County and Terre Haute, according to the Greater Terre Haute Chamber of Commerce.

“When you look at the greater mix of retail that has located here in the last 18 months, it is an indicator that regional groups are looking at our market,” said Rod Henry, president of the Chamber.

Examples include Towne South Shopping Plaza, renovated through an $18-million project that attracted Gander Mountain and Goody’s and retained Buffalo Wild Wings Grill & Bar.

Honey Creek Commons, a $20-million project, attracted Kohl’s, Boston’s Pizza and Cold Stone Creamery.

The Sycamore Terrace shopping center, with a Wal-Mart Supercenter, the second in Vigo County, was at least a $25-million investment, Henry said.

Shoppes at Honey Creek, a $2.5-million strip mall owned by Cleveland-based Doppco Enterprises LLC., soon will add two more retail stores, possibly a dental store [???-cjfjapan] and a package store. Verizon already has a store in that strip mall.

Penn Station East Coast Subs will open Dec. 12 at 3642 S. U.S. Highway 41 at Towne South, said Henry Stadler of Thompson Thrift, which owns the shopping center. The first Penn Station restaurant opened in 1985 in Cincinnati. The business serves grilled East Coast-style submarine sandwiches, fresh-cut fries and hand-squeezed lemonade.

Terre Haute’s second Starbucks, a coffee shop, opened Wednesday at 2500 Wabash Ave. A $300,000 renovation and addition of International House of Pancakes is under way by owner Scott Womack. The restaurant is open during the renovation.

Two new hotels are scheduled to open in 2007 and a third opened last week. Construction of Springhill Suites of Terre Haute, located behind the Holiday Inn off Interstate 70, will be completed in June, with the new hotel expected to open in August 2007, said Bill Berdine, who will serve as general manager of both hotels.

Construction on the Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House is scheduled for completion at the end of August, said Paul Thrift, co-owner of Thompson Thrift, which is building the hotel.

Also downtown, Clabber Girl, which manufacturers many retail baking goods such as baking powder and corn starch, is adding a 70,000-square-foot addition, an $8-million investment. Also under construction is a new $13.4-million, 216,000-square-foot parking/bus garage, the second garage in the downtown.

Best Western Terre Haute Inn and Suites staged its grand opening last week at 3053 S. U.S. Highway 41. It was previously the Signature Inn. The facility has 146 rooms, with 19 mini-suites, 12 in-room Jacuzzis, nine two-room suites and a studio board room suite. Forty-three rooms are non-smoking.

The board room accommodates 10 people and connects to a two double-bed room, said Denise Story, marketing director of the hotel. The hotel also offers two meeting rooms — a professional conference center, with 936-square-feet, holds up to 80 people and an executive meeting room, with 780-square-feet, for about 35 people.

Some features include an outdoor pool, on-site fitness center, on-site guest laundry facility and same-day valet cleaning service from Trimpe Cleaners, Story said, as well as romantic packages.

Another retailer, Hollister Co., a clothing store targeted at teenagers, is planning to open in the Honey Creek Mall at 3401 S. U.S. Highway 41.

While retail is expanding, many of the new stores will be names already established elsewhere in Vigo County. That is the case on Terre Haute’s east side.

The newest retail area on the east side is Sycamore Terrace, a Lauth Property Group development along Indiana 46, just north of Interstate 70. A second Wal-Mart Supercenter opened in the shopping center in August.

And, in the adjacent retail strip area, Maurices — a men’s and women’s fashion store — Dollar Tree, Verizon, Rent-A-Center and a Real Hacienda restaurant will open in the first quarter of 2007, said Peyton Bailey-Brown, marketing coordinator for Lauth Property Group.

Bob Evans and Steak-N-Shake own lots fronting Indiana 46. Neither store has released construction or opening dates.

Howard Greninger can be reached at (812) 231-4204 or [email protected].
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Old November 25th, 2006, 01:56 PM   #74
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This, however, may revolutionize the local economy

Exubera breathes Pfizer expansion into county
Howard Greninger
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Pfizer Inc.’s effect on Vigo County continues to grow as the company adds to its worldwide production of its new inhaled-insulin drug Exubera.

In March, the company announced it will hire more than 450 employees by 2009 plus invest $170 million at its plant in southern Vigo County. Now Pfizer has leased a 86,000-square-foot speculative building in the nearby Vigo County Industrial Park for warehouse space.

Vigo County officials last year entered into an agreement with David Hannum, board chairman of Garmong Development Co. Inc. Hannum was to obtain a loan of at least $2.1 million to build the speculative building to attract manufacturing, then market the building for sale or lease.

Vigo County has been paying $5,000 per month to cover interest costs on Hannum’s loan as part of the agreement to construct the speculative building.

The building was finished this year and the county paid $35,000 from May to October in interest payments. The county will be reimbursed, with that money going back to the county’s Economic Development Income Tax fund, said Vigo County Auditor Jim Bramble.

In addition, the county’s general fund will receive $120,000 to pay for industrial park property on which the building was constructed, said Steve Witt, president of the Terre Haute Economic Development Corp.

“That sale price is based on the buildable acres. There are 28 acres, of which 20 acres are actually buildable acres,” Witt said.

“We initially sought a manufacturing facility, yet as long as the jobs are created up the road, we feel like it serving its purpose and helping to facilitate job creation at Pfizer,” Witt said.

Because it is a lease, Garmong is the owner of the building and property, Witt said.

Pfizer’s growth will not likely have an immediate impact on Terre Haute International Airport-Hulman Field. Cargolux, an international freight company based in Germany, has designated Terre Haute as a secondary landing site in the event the carrier cannot land at the Indianapolis International Airport.

Airport officials had hoped to attract that air traffic to Terre Haute. The airport could activate its Foreign Trade Zone or FTZ to allow shipments into the airport.

Rick Chambers, a Pfizer spokesman, said the FTZ is not the key element. The main factor is Terre Haute does not have regular commercial flights.

“We don’t use much air freight at the Terre Haute [Pfizer] site; almost all of what we ship in or out goes by truck. The insulin that is shipped in [via air freight] is very concentrated, so we are not talking about large bulk quantity in any given shipment,” Chambers said.

“When we do use air freight, we tend to use airports that have commercial carriers and existing commercial schedules, because otherwise we would get involved in chartering flights, which is far more expensive,” Chambers said.

Cargolux began weekly service from Luxembourg to Indianapolis in February. The weekly international air cargo service between Luxembourg and Indianapolis is the result of a partnership among Roche Diagnostics, Schenker Logistics, Cargolux, Indianapolis International Airport and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Roche Diagnostics has its North American headquarters in Indianapolis. In 2005, Indianapolis International Airport handled a record 1.13 million tons of air cargo, making it the ninth-busiest cargo airport in the country and 20th-busiest cargo airport in the world.

Howard Greninger can be reached at (812) 231-4204 or [email protected].
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Old November 25th, 2006, 02:11 PM   #75
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New downtown factory addition: Clabber Girl

$8 million investment in Terre Haute will mean 42 new jobs


Thursday, October 26, 2006
By Howard Greninger, The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE - Not long ago, Tony George, chief executive officer of Clabber Girl Corp. and other Hulman-George family companies, said he believed the Terre Haute-based baking goods company may have reached its pinnacle.

"It wasn't 10 years ago that we were thinking that there wasn't much opportunity left for baking power or Clabber Girl brand," he said Tuesday.

That's all changed.

Clabber Girl, which makes the nation's top-selling baking powder and second-highest selling corn starch, produces 80 million cans of product annually in Terre Haute and serves markets in 44 foreign countries.

The company will soon introduce brownie mix and corn muffin mix onto the retail market in 2007.

Gary Morris, president and chief operating officer of Clabber Girl, over the past six years has brought many changes to the 156-year-old company, expanding its product line to include corn starch, baking soda, cookie and brownie mixes and an all-purpose baking mix.

The company has diversified distribution channels to include the industrial, food service, export, private label and fundraising markets.

On Tuesday, George, along with Gov. Mitch Daniels and Terre Haute Mayor Kevin Burke, among other dignitaries, ceremoniously broke ground for Clabber Girl's new 70,000-square-foot facility, near Ninth and Cherry streets, which will add 42 jobs. It is an $8 million investment, which includes about $2 million in new machinery. The building is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2007.

"This is the first major physical plant expansion of Clabber Girl since the 1920s," George said. "It is a vote of confidence for the city of Terre Haute and the state of Indiana."

The new facility will add a fully automated production line and incorporate principles of lean manufacturing and just-in-time production. Equipment can be modified quickly and efficiently to move from one product to another with little down production time. The equipment segregates allergen ingredients, such as gluten, peanuts, tree nuts and soy, giving it the ability to meet a growing demand for nutrition and ingredient labeling regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

George said Clabber Girl first considered Terre Haute because its existing plant was located in a tax increment finance district. Yet, despite that district being dissolved, the product of Clabber Girl warranted an investment in Terre Haute.

"There is opportunity in spite of that. It is an opportunity to grow our business. The team here had enough creative ideas to expand on business opportunities that made it worthwhile going forward," George said.

"You certainly like to have the incentives that are afforded you and want to take advantage of them, but you don't base necessarily your decision solely on that if there are other good reasons to go forward.

"The fact, based on this enterprise's history, it will be here a while and in the end, it will be a worthwhile investment that pays handsome dividends. That is my expectation," George said.

Clabber Girl plays an important role in Hulman-George companies, George said.

"It is the foundation from which we built the enterprise. In the last five or six years we have seen renewed enthusiasm at Ninth and Hulman in Terre Haute. The entire team has worked very hard to put together a business plan to leverage the brand Clabber Girl and grow our business into new market segments and to come up with new products lines that we can package and distribute.

"This is an exciting time," George said.

Terre Haute, George said, has a deep connection to his family, which came to America from Germany in the 1840s, starting business in Terre Haute in 1850. George said his children represent the sixth generation in the privately owned company.

Clabber Girl is receiving state incentives of up to $120,000 in training grants and about $150,000 in tax credits based on the company's capital investment. The city of Terre Haute has granted 10-year real and personal property tax abatements.

Hulman & Co. founder Herman Hulman's grandson, Anton "Tony" Hulman Jr., bought the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Corp. in 1945, transforming it into the "greatest spectacle in racing" with the Indianapolis 500.

To recognize that, Mayor Burke on Tuesday was lifted in a cherry picker and given a flag, which he waved to start construction. Two large trucks and a tractor immediately drove onto the site to begin work.

The existing Factory:


The new factory - crappy image - sorry
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Old November 25th, 2006, 02:14 PM   #76
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Downtown Arts Corridor - artists moving in...

Artists relocate into arts corridor area of Terre Haute

(Terre Haute) Tribune Star
By Austin Arceo, The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE - Raven Art Gallery owners Marty and Debi Martinez closed their old gallery when Marty was diagnosed with cancer and needed treatment.

But after he received treatment and wanted to head back to work, the couple relocated to downtown, an area known for its arts venues.

They weren't the only ones with that idea in mind.

Raven Art Gallery, which the couple opened earlier this year, is just blocks away from the arts corridor along Seventh Street in downtown Terre Haute, near Indiana State University. Several artists have opened galleries in the area, which is undergoing a nearly million-dollar construction project that will include more downtown parking, trees, flower boxes and decorative light posts to illuminate the area.

"Well, this is the most public demonstration to recognize the arts corridor," said Andrew Conner, executive director of Downtown Terre Haute Inc., an organization that promotes downtown Terre Haute.

The Martinezes closed their old gallery, M.D.'s and Granny's in the 1700 block of South Seventh Street in August 2005. In January 2006, after Marty had received treatment in Indianapolis, the couple opened the Raven Art Gallery downtown. They opened the gallery in the 800 block of Ohio Street because Marty knew of the city's arts corridor project, and wanted to take advantage of it.

"[With] the location, I wanted to be downtown," Marty Martinez said. "A lot of businesses and art places were coming over here."

Other artists jumped at the opportunity. Mary Ann Michna and Petra Nyendick, who had their own studios, in late September opened Halcyon Art Gallery, which is next to the Swope Art Museum on Seventh Street.

Michna and Nyendick work in the gallery, while displaying work of other artists in monthly exhibits. Nyendick noted that she wanted more room than she had in her old studio, so she and Michna approached Swope Museum officials about leasing the 1,200 square-foot gallery.

They also hope to lease the space next year.

"The response from the public has been all positive," Nyendick said, "and people are really hoping that we're successful and that we just keep doing this."

Construction crews are working on the arts corridor renovations along Seventh Street. The construction, which began in the fall, is expected to continue until next spring, said Conner, who was part of a group that helped the city engineer's office create plans for the project.

The city will pay only for about 20 percent of the project, thanks to a grant received in 2001 to help cover the costs.

Seventh Street was deemed the arts corridor because of existing arts venues on the street, which include the Indiana Theater, Swope Art Museum, the ISU Center for Performing Arts and ISU's New Theater.

The Hippodrome Theater, which Conner noted is the nation's oldest vaudeville theater, also is located in the area.

"So we're recognizing what's there already," Conner said, "and trying to build on that to draw even more artists and arts attractions to that corridor."
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Old December 17th, 2006, 06:10 PM   #77
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Another possible downtown hotel in Terre Haute, coupled with a new home for the Children's Museum:

Second hotel, Children's Museum in works for downtown

By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE— The Terre Haute Children’s Museum and a new extended-stay hotel will unite in a project designed to further resuscitate downtown.

Previously announced plans called for the museum to move to a new facility at North Third Street and Fourth Avenue. The Tribune-Star has learned from a source close to the project that the museum now will be part of a new construction venture along the 700 block of Wabash Avenue. The source spoke on condition of anonymity because the person is not authorized to discuss the issue.

Current strategy calls for the museum to move to a new facility next to the Tribune Building. which is at 721 Wabash Ave., the source said. The project is expected to be announced in the next few days, although several people emphasized that negotiations are still in the works.

The enterprise would not be the first major building project in the downtown area. The Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House currently is under construction at Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue.

Greg Gibson, who bought the former Terre Haute House and had it demolished, is also part of the group that owns the Tribune Building. He said that negotiations for the building are under way, but declined to elaborate.
Children’s Museum officials previously had announced plans to move out of the museum’s current downtown location to a new building that the museum’s Web site indicates will open in 2008. On Friday afternoon, a sign remained posted at that site.

But those plans appear to have changed, according to several sources who confirmed the joint museum and hotel project but also requested anonymity.
In the past six months, downtown has undergone a series of changes. Construction crews are raising the new Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House and a new parking facility, which also will feature the city’s bus depot. Hulman and Co., makers of Clabber Girl baking powder and other products, at Ninth Street and Wabash Avenue is undergoing a multimillion-dollar renovation and expansion as well.

The previous Terre Haute House shut its hotel doors in 1970. A survey by Indiana State University and commissioned by the city reports that nearly 70 percent of people surveyed noted that they are “pleased” or “very pleased” with the demolition of the building and the creation of the new hotel, which is expected to open next summer.

“I think it vindicates what we suspected all along, that people wanted to see something positive happening on that corner downtown,” said City of Terre Haute communications director Peter Ciancone. “They seem to be pleased with what’s going on.”

Gibson said that he has been trying to get some projects in the Tribune Building property since he bought it in 2004, and especially since the Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House project began.

“I think downtown’s really on the move, and I think there are a lot of things happening there…,” Gibson said, “and I think people are upbeat and excited about what’s going on downtown, and I think there’s a whole new attitude about Terre Haute.”

Austin Arceo can be reached at (812) 231-4214 or [email protected].

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Old December 19th, 2006, 10:41 AM   #78
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Museum, hotel announcement expected today
By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — The company that will manage the Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House is involved in a new downtown project to be announced today.

The Terre Haute Economic Development Corp. sent e-mail invitations on Monday to inform people of a gathering at 10 a.m. today at the Tribune Building regarding “two new major downtown development announcements.” The Tribune-Star reported Sunday that the Terre Haute Children’s Museum will join with an extended-stay hotel in a construction project that includes the Tribune Building at 721 Wabash Ave.

Tim Dora of Dora Brothers Hospitality Corp. confirmed Monday that his company, which will manage the Hilton currently under construction at Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue, is part of the new project, although he declined to elaborate.

The Dora company’s Web site shows several of their extended-stay hotels in Indiana, including a Charwood Suites in Columbus, a Candlewood Suites in Indianapolis and a Staybridge Suites in Plainfield. Extended-stay hotels offer weekly and monthly rates for visitors rather than nightly rates that are typical of regular hotels.

Terre Haute developer Greg Gibson, who owns the Tribune Building, said late last week that negotiations for the facility were ongoing, but he would not provide further details. Gibson did not return several messages seeking comment by the Tribune-Star’s deadline Monday night.

Officials from the Terre Haute Children’s Museum initially planned to move the museum from its current downtown location at 523 Wabash Ave. to a new facility at Third Street and Fourth Avenue.

But a source close to the project told the Tribune-Star the museum is included in a new construction plan for the 700 block of Wabash Avenue.

Along with a renovated Tribune Building, the new building also will house part of the extended-stay hotel.

The source requested anonymity because the person is not authorized to discuss the plan.

The Children’s Museum leased the land for its northside expansion plan from Union Hospital. The land will revert back to the hospital because the museum no longer will be built there, said Kristi Roshel, marketing and public relations manager for Union Hospital.

The joint effort will allow the Children’s Museum to remain a downtown attraction in an area that includes several other museums, art galleries and specialty shops.

“We like to talk about the Children’s Museum already as an attraction for families,” said Andrew Conner, the executive director of Downtown Terre Haute Inc., a group that promotes the area. “If these plans come through, I think it’s going to be a bigger and even better presence downtown.”

Downtown Terre Haute has been engulfed by a flurry of major construction activity in recent months: the Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House, a parking garage, a multimillion-dollar renovation of Clabber Girl and the arts corridor renovations along Seventh Street.

While Terre Haute communications director Peter Ciancone would not comment on the newest plans, he said city officials are “pleased that projects are moving forward.”

Austin Arceo can be reached at (812) 231-4214 or [email protected].
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Old December 19th, 2006, 10:42 AM   #79
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Despite the loss of the Terre Haute House, 2006 was a good year for Downtown Terre Haute: Here is a list of projects under construction, recently announced, and recently completed. This is more investment in the area than has been seen in 20 years, at least. Glad we caught the tail end of this boom!

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Old December 21st, 2006, 11:20 AM   #80
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Thanks for the updates and how you've kinda turned this into a Terre Haute development thread.

Everytime I visit Terre Haute (which is often as my partners family lives near there) I am terribly dismayed at the state of downtown. Vigo County has such a beautiful courthouse to stand as a grand centerpiece...but much of the citys core was lost.

I do hope that as the years continue downtown will continue to grow back to life and that perhaps Indiana State University will become a stronger partner in helping the rebirth. I have always thought Terre Haute was not maximinzing the effects this student population could have on the city's core.

but, here is to hoping for a bright future for Terre Haute!
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