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Old August 12th, 2007, 06:09 PM   #141
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Published: August 11, 2007 07:44 pm



Historical Treasure: Deming Hotel a familiar landmark
By Linda Patrick
Special to the Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — This week’s historical treasure is another landmark familiar to those in the downtown area, the Deming Hotel at 615 Cherry St.

Named for financier and philanthropist Demas Deming, the hotel occupies the site of the old Congregational Church. The firm Holabird and Roche of Chicago designed the building in the “Second Empire” style, with ornate cornices and plasterwork inspired by French architecture. Construction was by the Sheldon-Breck Construction Co. of St. Louis at a cost of $400,000. F.P.W. Young was the supervisor.

Designed as a fireproof hotel, the eight-story structure is an all-masonry building with poured concrete floors and ceilings. Detailed records still exist of the amounts and kinds of materials used in its construction. The Terre Haute Coal and Lime Co. furnished 4,450 cubic yards of gravel and sand, as well as 7,550 barrels of Marquette Portland cement for the concrete work on the building and sidewalks. Also used were 648,000 various kinds of bricks and 300 tons of twisted steel. It should be noted that during construction, no accident of any consequence occurred.

For the interior, the Connersville Furniture Co. manufactured all the bedroom furniture. Their local representatives, the A.Z. Foster Co., provided everything else except for the linens and kitchen equipment. The Adamson & Anderson Co. was contracted for all the glasswork in the hotel, using 10,000 pieces. When completed, the hotel had 250 rooms and 200 baths. The Mandel Studio of Chicago provided a large painting of Indians with Fort Harrison in the background for the lobby. This painting was removed during renovation and later returned. It can still be seen in the lobby today.

The Deming Hotel opened officially for business on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1914, with a Charity Ball to benefit The Boys Club. “Billie” Cochran was the first manager, with Tom Nelson as his first lieutenant manager. John O. Holmes, a traveling representative for Eli Lilly and Co., was the first name on the guest register. With dinner at 7 and dancing at 10, a good time was had by all. La Betinna, a sprightly little dancer, entertained the guests with her graceful numbers with Mons Narvahes. Their dances in the dining room and tavern were one of the enjoyable features of the hotel send-off. The first noted actor/dancer to stay at the hotel was Joseph Santley, appearing in Phillip Bartholomew’s musical comedy “When Dreams Come True,” at the Grand Opera House on Thursday, Oct. 22, 1914.

If you have access to the Internet and would like to see what the hotel looked like originally, check out “Wabash Valley Vision and Voices.” It’s a digital memory project for West Central Indiana. Select the “Advanced Search” option, and then enter Hotel Deming in the “exact phrase” box. Pick “City of Terre Haute” from the collections list. Hit “go.” You will see some absolutely stunning pictures of the lobby, ballroom, writing room and more.

The hotel was owned and operated by the Deming Hotel/Land Co. until Dec. 28, 1962, when the property was sold to Hulman and Co., effective Jan. 1, 1963. The sale included the 80-car garage at 621 Cherry St. and the 100-car parking lot at 618-620 Cherry St. In 1963, the property changed hands again when it was purchased by Indiana State University for use as a men’s dormitory and later as a conference center. In February 1976, ISU asked Gov. Otis R. Bowen for authorization to sell the conference center/hotel.

On Sept. 21, 1978, Congressman John Myers and Mayor William Brighton announced completion of financial arrangements for the $4.15 million “Deming Project.” A month later, Bethesda Corp. and the Terre Haute Housing Authority began rehabilitation of the hotel into 109 apartments for low-income elderly and the handicapped, with completion set for December 1979. As giving and civic-minded a man as he was, I think Mr. Deming would approve. Today the Deming Center is owned by the Bethesda Elderly Housing Corp. and managed by Pfister & Co. Inc.
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Old August 12th, 2007, 09:10 PM   #142
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Hey CtfJapan, thanks for the Terre Haute updates! I'm headed back there to finish college up here in about a week or so. I'll try and post some construction photos if I have time, there's some great history in some of the DT buildings. Anyway here's an article on the new student center if you haven't posted it already.



http://www.indstate.edu/news/news.php?newsid=962

Indiana State breaks ground for $21.7 million Student Recreation Center
July 19, 2007

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. -- For a group of young Indiana State University alumni, a dream was realized Thursday (July 19) with the groundbreaking of the future home of the University’s Student Recreation Center.

The 109,420-square-foot facility will house a three-court gymnasium; a recreation aquatics facility, with separate pools for lap swimming and instructional/leisure activities; fitness center, outfitted with cardio and strength training equipment; climbing wall; elevated jogging/running track; multi-purpose activity studios suitable for aerobics, martial arts and fitness classes; a multi-activity court designed for indoor soccer, roller hockey and other activities; offices for Recreational Sports, a healthy snack bar, an outdoor equipment center; and locker facilities and equipment rooms.

ISU President Lloyd W. Benjamin III lauded the efforts of current and former Student Government Association Presidents Megan McManana, Hobart Scales and A.J. Patton along with three former student trustees, Doug Huntsinger, Jessica Robertson and Grant Scharton, for championing the project from the planning stages to reality.

“They showed extraordinary leadership with this project,” Benjamin said.

All six students were in attendance and participated in the groundbreaking.

“This project was conceived by, designed by and funded by students,” said Thomas Ramey, vice president of Student Affairs.

Scales recalled the humble beginnings of the project.

“Megan (McManama) and Doug (Huntsinger) were the founders of this idea. I remember sitting in Doug’s office and seeing this idea come to life,” he said.

For Patton, the current Student Government President, it was a momentous occasion.

“We’ve worked very hard in order for this project to materialize for us all. The Rec Center is a fine example of current and past students giving back to the University. We’ve all made sacrifices for this project.”

According to Benjamin, the new facility will enhance the student experience.

“We anticipate this facility will become the center of activity on our campus, and we are excited about the opportunities it will provide our students,” he said.

The $21.7 million facility, designed by Hastings+Chivetta Architects Inc. of St. Louis, will be located directly across from Lincoln Quad, an ISU residence hall, and will be accessible from Tippecanoe Street.

"This building is not only attractive but very functional," said Ramey. "It promotes healthy lifestyles, encourages a life-long commitment to wellness and strengthens the sense of community on campus. This facility, along with the expanded recreational program, will also introduce new forms of recreation to students."

The project impressed Clyde Kersey, a local legislator who helped guide it through the Indiana General Assembly.

“This was a very unique project because it came directly from the students,” he said.

Construction on the two-story facility is anticipated to take 18 months. Targeted completion date for the project is early 2009. Hannig Construction will serve as the general contractor.

During the regularly-scheduled meeting of the ISU Board of Trustees, Mike Alley was selected to serve a third term as president for 2007-08. Ron Carpenter, Indianapolis, was chosen to serve as vice president while Richard Shagley, Terre Haute, will hold the office of secretary.

In addition to selecting officers for the upcoming term, new trustee Joyce Rogers of Indianapolis and student trustee Amy Huntsinger of Frankton were seated. Two other trustees, Norman Lowery and Ron Carpenter, began new four-year terms.

render is here: http://www.indstate.edu/sga/REC%20CENTER
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Old August 12th, 2007, 11:17 PM   #143
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Good deal, Babbage - I don't live in TH anymore, but I try to keep up with development there. Please entertain us with some photos!


There are a good many pictures of downtown TH development at www.terrehautehouse.net as well.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:37 PM   #144
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Collett Park Neighborhood Plans

Officials have vision for Collett Park

Public invited Tuesday to first of several ‘visioning workshops’
By Howard Greninger
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — A public “visioning workshop” will be conducted at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Ouabache Elementary School, 501 Maple Ave., to develop a Collett Park Vicinity Neighborhood Plan.

The workshop is the first of several the Vigo County Area Planning Department will conduct in conjunction with the city of Terre Haute, Union Hospital and the Collett Park Neighborhood Association.

Union Hospital has paid the county $75,000 for the plan being developed by Camiros Inc., an urban planning and development firm.

The plan should be completed in January or February of next year, said Jeremy Weir, executive director of the Area Planning Department.

The goal of the workshop includes developing strategies to ensure that Union Hospital and the surrounding residential areas are compatible, “in terms of land needs, access and circulation, safety, and character,” Weir said.

Also, the group will study ways to make use of vacant properties and ensure that new housing complements the character of existing homes, he said.

“It is an opportunity for the neighborhood to develop what they feel the character of the neighborhood is and what makes it that way,” Weir said.

Camiros Inc. already has completed an existing land use inventory as well as a drive-by assessment of the condition of buildings in the area, Weir said. In addition, information from the U.S. Census has been collected on population, including a breakdown by age, gender and race, as well as household income. Those findings will be presented at the workshop, Weir said.

The study area is bound by Locust Street to the south, Lafayette Avenue and 12th Street to the east, Florida Avenue to the north and U.S. 41/Third Street to the west and includes Union Hospital, Collett Park and many single family homes and multi-family dwellings.

“The workshop allows the public to tell us what they think and develop what our strategy will be for future use of the properties there,” Weir said.

Once a final plan is developed, Weir said it would be presented as resolutions to the Vigo County Plan Commission and to the Terre Haute City Council for each to adopt as policy for future development.

For more information about the workshop, contact Weir at the Area Planning Department at (812) 462-3354.

Howard Greninger can be contacted at (812) 231-4204 or [email protected].
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:38 PM   #145
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Historic District Survey

Farrington’s Grove Historical District releases results of neighborhood survey

Results show residents unhappy with crime, maintenance, trash
By Laura Followell
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Farrington’s Grove Historical District Inc. held a block party Sunday to reveal what the district needs and discussed a plan with its neighborhood residents.

The group conducted a “neighborhood-plan” survey earlier this month and showed its findings during the three-hour event in the 800 block of South Fifth Street.

Farrington’s Grove board president Michael Carrell said: “The ultimate goal is to set up a neighborhood plan. … In Farrington’s Grove we’ve got a hodgepodge of businesses, fraternities, rentals and home businesses. Our goal is to make this a true neighborhood.”

Group officials want the plan to assist in preserving the historical homes and prevent commercial zoning in the district, Carrell said.

Volunteers distributed 1,100 questionnaires and 145 people corresponded.

The results indicated that people living in the district deemed the following most problematic: litter, trash and junk; crime; maintenance of houses and yards; vacant houses; and the condition of alleys, curbs and sidewalks.

Resident Patricia Pross, who has lived in the area for seven years, said she went to the event out of curiosity and in hopes of meeting new people.

Pross shared her concerns and frustrations with the neighborhood organization.

“I think [Farrington’s Grove] has gone downhill. There’s too many renters. Occupants or the owners should be made to maintain it. You can go and see how the houses are decaying. … Pretty soon there’s not going to be a Farrington’s Grove,” she said.

Farrington’s Grove boundaries are roughly Seventh Street to the east, Fourth Street to the west, Poplar Street to the north and Hulman Street to the south.

The survey asked respondents about their type of living situation, how long they’ve lived in the Farrington’s Grove neighborhood and what they deemed most unsettling about it.

Chris Patterson, a Farrington’s Grove resident for five months, said that many rental-property tenants in the area are problematic due to lack of lawn and facility maintenance.

He went to the event share his concerns and to gain insight on how he can renovate his old house.

“They don’t build houses like this anymore. There’s more craftsmanship in them than you get now,” he said.

The Farrington’s Grove group will conduct workshops later in the fall where people will discuss what they like about Farrington’s Grove, what they want to preserve and to address issues.

The first is scheduled from 7 to 10 p.m. Oct. 2 in the building at Fifth and Crawford streets.

In the next several months, the group intends to research and discuss major issues facing the area as part of the process to create the plan. The group hopes to have a document finished by the end of the year or early 2008.

They will then make presentations about the plan to the Terre Haute Redevelopment Commission and Vigo County Area Planning Commission.

Laura Followell can be reached at (812) 231-4253 or [email protected].



Survey results

• Litter, trash and junk

Problem 130

Not a problem 14

No response 1

• Crime

Problem 121

Not a problem 15

No response 9

• Condition of alleys

Problem 120

Not a problem 21

No response 4

• Maintenance of houses

Problem 118

Not a problem 24

No response 3

• Vacant houses

Problem 114

Not a problem 27

No response 4

• Maintenance of yards

Problem 104

Not a problem 38

No response 3

• Condition of curbs and sidewalks

Problem 100

Not a problem 35

No response 10
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:54 PM   #146
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Extended Stay Hotel Downtown paused...but on track

Candlewood Suites project awaits final plans
By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Officials are finishing the construction preparations before building will begin on the new Candlewood Suites along Wabash Avenue.

The extended-stay hotel will be built in the former Tribune Building and an adjacent structure that also will house the Children’s Museum. Crews are finished with demolition work of the building’s interior, but construction costs and plans need to be finalized before work continues, project officials said Monday.

Everything is “in a holding pattern” until the plans are completed, said Paul Thrift of Thompson Thrift, Inc., the contracting company that will supervise construction.

Project bids currently are being reviewed so the construction cost can be finalized for a loan, said Tim Dora, of Dora Hotel Co., LLC, which will manage the hotel.

“Everything looks fine,” Dora said, “and [we’re] anxious to get started.”

The property for the Children’s Museum site still has to be transferred to museum officials, which will be done very soon, Dora said.

The hotel, which will take about 10 months to build, he said, is expected to cost $9.5 million.

The museum and hotel will be created simultaneously. The new children’s facility will cost about $4 million for the land, building and initial exhibits, and $1 million more for an endowment to help continue support operations and exhibits.

The museum’s board of directors had raised $3.7 million as of Aug. 1, board member Steve Schrohe said in a recent article.

Schrohe said in a message Monday that he didn’t have any new information to report, but hoped to have announcements regarding fundraising and a groundbreaking “in the relatively near future.”

“Everything is going along fine, as far as I know … ,” he said.

Austin Arceo can be reached at (812) 231-4214 or [email protected].
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:55 PM   #147
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Mayor to be first guest in new downtown hotel

Mayor Kevin Burke slated to be new Hilton Garden Inn’s first guest

New hotel could be open by mid-September
By Austin Arceo
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Some unfamiliar people will be working in Terre Haute next Tuesday.

A squad of “star employees” from various hotels operated by Dora Brothers Hospitality Corp. will supervise the preparations of various departments of the Hilton Garden Inn-Terre Haute House at the intersection of Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue. The hotel is expected to open formally Oct. 1, but officials hope to have a “soft opening” the week of Sept. 17, said Tim Dora, a partner of Dora Brothers Hospitality Corp.

He also owns Dora Hotel Co., LLC [Limited Liability Corp.], which will manage the hotel.

“I think the first of October, we’d be able to operate at 100 percent capacity,” he said, “and we want to make sure that people’s first experiences are good experiences.”

Workers moved furniture into the hotel Monday. The Hilton Web site has begun accepting reservations for people staying Nov. 1 and later.

The opening will mark the first time in more than 35 years that a visitor has stayed at a Terre Haute House hotel at the site. The first guest will be Mayor Kevin Burke, Dora said.

“And I’m going to charge him full price,” he added.

Burke confirmed that he will pay to stay at the hotel.

The administration is excited about the new downtown site, which will be the first active visitors’ lodgings at its location since before Burke first came to Terre Haute in 1974.

“… And we presently sell out all of our hotel rooms about 35 weekends a year,” he said, “so we’re quite confident that they’ll do well.”

Austin Arceo can be reached at (812) 231-4214 or [email protected].
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Old August 28th, 2007, 04:07 PM   #148
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Learn what cultural tidbits you’re missing in Terre Haute

Rose-Hulman professor has Web site: ‘Dr. Tom’s Guide to Terre Haute for the Culturally Bereft’
By Mark Bennett
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Tom and Diedre Adams had just unpacked their belongings after moving to Terre Haute from Atlanta. They sat on the front porch of their house on South Seventh Street.

“We were so bored that we made up a game of counting the number of foreign cars going by,” Tom recalled of that day in 1999. “And after an hour and a half, we found a total of two. And we even wondered if the Toyota pickup truck should’ve counted. And I think of how far we’ve come since then.”

Eight years ago, the Adamses had no idea a little gas station just up Seventh Street stocked an astonishing smorgasbord of Indian groceries. Or that the Terre Haute Community Theater shows international films for a full weekend, every other month. Or that George’s Cafe on Cherry Street serves a Lebanese dish called baba ghanoush “that is to die for.” Or that Sonka Irish Pub & Cafe on Wabash Avenue sells the creamy, black English beer Young’s Oatmeal Stout.

Soon, they discovered all those places and more.

“After my wife and I had lived here for a couple of months, we realized there weren’t the number of cultural activities there were around Atlanta,” Tom said, “but there were more than we realized.”

He figured there had to be other new Hauteans, transplanted from metropolises, who were killing time by counting the passing Hyundais and Subarus.

So Tom created a Web site to enlighten those longing something out of the ordinary. Thus, “Dr. Tom’s Guide to Terre Haute for the Culturally Bereft” was born.

Initially, Tom intended it for new professors and students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, where he teaches mechanical engineering. Eventually, people outside the Rose community have stumbled upon his Web site, too, just as he and Diedre do when they go exploring for unusual local gems, such as the potato omelets at Harry & Budd’s on South 25th Street.

“We have a knack for finding those out-of-the-way, little hidden treasures that aren’t well advertised but have great things to offer,” Tom said.

His Web site offers suggestions to folks wondering “where I can go to do yoga, or get a good cup of coffee, or hear a symphony.”

As of this month, Dr. Tom’s Guide has gotten nearly 4,000 Web hits. It lists his suggestions for places to eat, drink, view art and films, listen to music and recreate. The Guide also includes the light-hearted and entertaining tale of Thomas M. Adams’ 38-year journey from his birth in Vermillion, S.D., just before the Summer of Love to his life now in Terre Haute, where he works as an associate professor at Rose-Hulman and Diedre teaches at West Vigo Middle School.

The Adamses didn’t end up here by accident. Tom spent four years in Terre Haute, studying mechanical engineering at Rose, before graduating in 1990. Those ties were about as deep as any in Tom’s nomadic life. His parents, two microbiologists, moved their family from South Dakota to Mexico City, the South Carolina cities of Columbia and Beaufort, New Delhi, and Savannah, Ga.

Globetrotting has sharpened his eye for nuggets of cultural gold.

“Maybe that lack of roots is something that always keeps me searching,” he said, leaning back in his office chair, behind a desk that holds a healthy stack of jazz and classical guitar CDs.

A culture of comfort

It was in his family’s last stop, Savannah, that Tom finished high school and met Diedre. That moment, 20 years ago, came at a meeting of the Savannah chapter of Mensa, an organization of people with high IQs. In 1990, they married and settled in Atlanta, and after Tom earned his doctorate from Georgia Tech, he accepted a job offer in 1999 at Rose-Hulman, his alma mater.

“I didn’t want to move to Terre Haute and leave the culture and excitement of Atlanta,” Diedre admitted. “I came because it was Thomas’ dream to teach at Rose.”

Soon, though, she found her work environment here, as a classroom teacher, featured students who were more engaged, talented colleagues and greater access to equipment and training. Terre Haute was safer, too. In Atlanta, she had fears for the family, including her two young children, after having two cars stolen, eight cars wrecked and an armed intruder in their home. By contrast, their “biggest headache” in Terre Haute has been the theft of gargoyle statues in front of their house.

Once, Diedre left her purse in a basket at Kroger in Terre Haute, and didn’t realize it until she’d gotten home.

“I went back to the store, and someone had taken it to the customer service center, complete with money and credit cards,” she recalled.

Eight years after making that apprehensive move to this much smaller city, Diedre is satisfied with its offerings.

“We could go to Indy, Bloomington or Chicago on the weekends, but we don’t often — too much to do here,” she said. “We get up, ride our bikes along the trail to one of the coffee shops, go foraging for antiques, grab a meal at one of the restaurants, check out one of the museums or parks or one of the special events like art shows, plays, music in the park, etc.

“The pace is much slower than in Atlanta,” Diedre added, “but the quality of life is so much better.”


Charm, eggplant, omelets


One of their occasional targets is, of all places, the Sunoco Sunmart at 408 S. Seventh St. Alongside the usual gas station fare of unleaded fuel, cigarette lighters, pop, milk and doughnuts are two aisles devoted to Indian groceries and spices.

The manager, Dharminder Singh, travels to Chicago every Thursday to buy exotic fresh vegetables such as Chinese okra, dhokan white radishes and tiny Indian eggplants. Singh, who came to the United States from India in 1994, also brings back special orders, such as those from Middle Eastern customers preparing for the recent Ramadan celebration. And then there are curious folks like Tom Adams.

“I have American customers coming in here, buying [Indian] spices and snacks,” Singh said, “and I have people come in and say, ‘I’ve never seen a gas station like this.’”

Dr. Tom’s Guide to Terre Haute steers people in Singh’s direction. That station and the other places noted on the site are local ventures. Though Tom has nothing against chains, such as the International House of Pancakes, “IHOP doesn’t need my help.”

Finding Harry & Budd’s, by contrast, requires some inside information. The restaurant at 1440 S. 25th St. has no sign. Its hours are roughly 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on weekdays, though owner Jeffrey Marks said those “fluctuate.”

“If somebody asks me to be here early, I can do that,” Marks said.

Tom Adams finds that gray-area in Harry & Budd’s schedule to be “part of its charm.”

Besides that, “He’s got — hands down — the best omelets in town,” Tom added.

Tom likes entertainment, too. He does a little of that himself, playing jazz guitar — an evolution from his long-haired days in heavy metal bands as a Rose-Hulman student. Tom’s long hair remains, as does a bit of his musical tastes. He often performs in a duet with singer Julia Williams, the executive director of Rose’s office of institutional research, planning and assessment. For the college’s annual Engineers in Concert events, they played Tom’s jazz arrangement of Ozzy Osbourne’s “Crazy Train.”

“It took people a while to realize what we were playing,” Williams remembered, “and then at that point, it became very funny.”

Another of Tom’s preferred entertainment outlets is the Community Theater’s international film series. One of the most memorable was the Japanese flick “Afterlife.” Under its premise, people, after death, go to a camp. There, counselors help the recently deceased pick their favorite life memory, film that vision and then let those folks take that clip with them into oblivion.

“Just a delightful film,” Tom said, “and as everybody was leaving the theater, they were all talking about, ‘What would it be for me?’”

Undoubtedly, at least a few of the Adamses’ favorite moments are linked to places listed on Dr. Tom’s Guide.

Diedre and Tom spent most of this summer away from home at workshops and other out-of-town activities. “When we got back, Thomas looked at me and said, ‘I never thought I would be glad to get back to Terre Haute. I guess this means it’s home now,’” she recalled. “I guess it is.”



Mark Bennett can be reached at [email protected] or (812) 231-4377.



Tips from the Dr.


Here are a few samples from Dr. Tom’s Guide to Terre Haute for the Culturally Bereft:


Dining


The baba ghanoush at George’s Cafe (627 Cherry St.). “This is the best baba ghanoush around, made fresh daily by George’s brother Albert, who … had his lamb stew recipe featured in Gourmet Magazine.”


Imbibing


Young’s Oatmeal Stout at Sonka Irish Pub & Cafe (1366 Wabash Ave.). “At Sonka’s, white collar and blue collar, liberals and conservatives, profs and students all peacefully coexist. Nay, they joyfully co-imbibe.”


Looking


International film series at the Community Theater of Terre Haute (1431 S. 25th St.). “The film makers feel no need to have a typical, formulaic plot, so you never know where the plot’s going to go.”


Listening


Terre Haute Symphony Orchestra (Tilson Auditorium, Seventh Street and Larry Bird Avenue). “We have a surprisingly good symphony for a town the size of 60,000.”


Doing


Yoga at Fun With Yoga (3726 E. Wabash Ave.). “Not only will yoga improve your flexibility and balance, but your strength and endurance as well. And if you choose power yoga, trust me, you will sweat — a lot.”


For more tips


Go to www.rose-hulman.edu/~adams1/bereft.html
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Old August 28th, 2007, 08:16 PM   #149
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too bad the beautiful Terre Haute House was demolished to make way for Dora's Interstate Delux Hotel
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Old August 29th, 2007, 06:01 AM   #150
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New Restaurant "downtown"

This is off US 41/Third Street/Dixie Bee Highway - across from the courthouse. Knowing TH, this will be popular - just wish they had housed it in one of the few beautiful old downtown buildings...

Grand Traverse Pie Company comes to Terre Haute

Bakery is first out-of-state site for Michigan-based café

Summertime flavors and aromas will fill the newest Grand Traverse Pie Company location this summer season. Opening its doors for the first time outside the state of Michigan, Grand Traverse Pie Company invited pie and café enthusiasts to visit the newest location at Third and Cherry streets in Terre Haute on Monday. GTPC, with 10 locations in Michigan and now one in Indiana, welcomed patrons with fresh-baked aromas flowing from the open-air, from-scratch kitchen.

GTPC is a full-service bakery café in the growing “fast casual” sector occupied by Panera Bread and Corner Bakery. The big difference is that in addition to a wonderful breakfast, lunch, and dinner offering, it’s all about pie at GTPC. More than 25 varieties of fruit, cream, meringue, and key lime pies will be available every day, made from scratch, on-site.

Summertime fruit pie favorites like cherry, blueberry, and apple pie will be on hand every day.

Franchise owners Don and Barbara Wright, along with their two sons Jeff and Mark, have owned and operated several successful family businesses. One of these is a Blockbuster franchise.

The Wrights learned of the GTPC from a friend in the franchising business, according to a statement released by the family.

They traveled to Michigan to check it out, and were not disappointed.

The GTPC also carries stacked deli sandwiches and other types of picnic fare, and provides catering.

Visitors to the café famous for its cherry pie will experience all of the sights and sensations of an active “real food” kitchen.

Guests were even invited to taste a sample of something just out of the oven.

To learn more about the new cafe and bakery, call (812) 235-1582.
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Old August 30th, 2007, 04:09 PM   #151
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Terry Hut: ScuptureTown

New sculpture will showcase Arts Corridor entrance
By Laura Followell
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Those who travel past the corner of Seventh and Poplar streets might be in for a surprise this winter.

Art Spaces Inc. has found another sculpted masterpiece and anticipates installing “The Gatekeeper” at the corner on the Vigo County Public Library’s grass.

Artist Mary Kramer of Penland, N.C., along with officials from Art Spaces Inc., were on scene Wednesday with a “moquette model,” or prototype, of the artwork to determine just the right spot.

The piece is tentatively titled “The Gatekeeper,” because it will signify the entrance to the Arts Corridor, said Bev Cristee, vice president of Arts Spaces Inc.

“This really is going to be a stunning addition to the Arts Corridor, and it’s just absolutely gorgeous,” Cristee said.

Art Spaces is a not-for-profit organization working to establish a collection of public outdoor sculptures in Terre Haute and the Wabash Valley.

If all goes as planned, the granite and stainless-steel sculpture will be installed by the end of January, she said.

David Vollmer, executive director of the Swope Art Museum, said the ground must be tested by city officials before the site can be approved for the installation.

Vollmer said this project has been in the works since 2003, and he is excited to see it nearing its final stage.

As part of the selection process, a committee, consisting of art experts, community members and Art Spaces board members, submit a call for artists that includes what the organization is looking for, as well as site-specific information.

Artists then submit moquettes and proposals, and the committee chooses the artist and the piece.

“It’s not designed in somebody’s studio and then just plopped down. They are made for that space,” Vollmer said.

Art pieces displayed within a community help build the community’s identity and will make the city more attractive to its residents, according to the organization.

Kramer said her pieces of art are based on what communities want.

The “Gatekeeper” will be designed in a way that offers room for interpretation.

Kramer’s pieces are not readily-identified figures or objects, she said.

The sculpture will be 26 feet wide and 14 feet tall, she said. People will be able to walk under it, “like a portal,” Kramer said.

Laura Followell can be reached at (812) 231-4253 or [email protected].
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Old September 4th, 2007, 01:19 AM   #152
Babbage08
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A few pictures of construction in Terre Haute:

New Parking, transit facility:



Snapped a few photos of the Hilton Garden Inn as I was driving by, didn't turn out so well, LOL:











Construction on Clabber Girl building:



The new Hilton Garden Inn Terre Haute House is certainly an injustice to what once stood there:



At least there is something going on at the site, however. Also downtown is the new Grand Traverse Pie Company, this one in Michigan looks similiar except the one in Terre Haute is blue:



I'm just glad they decided to open DT instead of south of I70. They are attracting a lot of attention as it is the first location in Indiana.

Anyway I'll take some more photos of the "Updated" Terre Haute House soon, as well as the new ISU Student Rec Center, and Childrens Museum/hotel.
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Old September 4th, 2007, 03:03 AM   #153
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terre haute is defianitly going through an urban renewal!
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Old September 4th, 2007, 04:28 AM   #154
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Nice work, babbage - keep 'em coming!
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Old September 6th, 2007, 01:51 AM   #155
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Another new building downtown...

Federal Courts Are Staying in Terre Haute

By News 10 Staff

Terre Haute's Federal Courts will stay in the downtown area.

An empty lot in Downtown Terre Haute, will soon be filled with a new building, and the big news is what's going inside that building.

It was just announced: a new building to house the Federal Court will be built in downtown Terre Haute.

The location, just across the street on 921 Ohio Street.

That's the former site of Bunch Nurseries.

Terre Haute developer Thompson Thrift will build the building and lease the building to the Federal Government for just under $500,000 a year.

Besides the Federal Courts, the building will also house the U.S. Attorney's Office, the U.S. Marshals service, and the U.S. Probation and Pre-trial Services.

There's no set date on when the building will be complete.

The government has agreed to give the building to Indiana State University.

They plan to turn it into their new School of Business.
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Old September 8th, 2007, 06:23 AM   #156
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Great Post!!

Hello everyone! I've been reading this post for some time and I just want to say how much I appreciate it. It's great to see others interested in Downtown TH development. I have always wanted to find a place to discuss these happenings with others, and "like-duh"...never thought to post here! Those pictures are GREAT; keep 'em comin'!
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Old September 8th, 2007, 06:48 AM   #157
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also...

In case anyone else has been wondering, I received a tip today that progress should resume on the Trib very soon. I have been worried as to why worked stopped but heard today from someone reliable that it is simply corporate redtape; and not related to the integrity of the structure like others are saying. Actually, I think it'll make you laugh when you find out what the hold up is!
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Old September 9th, 2007, 07:22 PM   #158
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There was something about the delay on the Trib project a few days ago, I think. What did you hear?

There are a lot of pictures of downtown TH development at www.terrehautehouse.net - czech it out!

Quote:
Originally Posted by borninfarrington_g View Post
In case anyone else has been wondering, I received a tip today that progress should resume on the Trib very soon. I have been worried as to why worked stopped but heard today from someone reliable that it is simply corporate redtape; and not related to the integrity of the structure like others are saying. Actually, I think it'll make you laugh when you find out what the hold up is!
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Old September 9th, 2007, 08:46 PM   #159
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trib

Basically I heard that a local bank is being feisty about the loan and that the developers are confident that ANY other bank in town will make the loan if they continue to be difficult.

I wonder if the bank in question is showing a little "corporate jealousy"...because ONB is getting all the publicity; both for their wonderful donation to the Children's Museum, and for the fact that they are next door to the trib and will directly benefit from it's redevelopment.

Meanwhile, the bank in question is surrounded by an empty parking garage, several vacant store fronts, a half-remodeled pawn shop, a few buildings that don't fit downtown, a recently-troubled community center, and several of Dr. S's vacant buildings. However, this is just a hunch...I have nothing to base this on.

What I refer to as "corporate jealousy" is probably more akin to "not helping one's competitors to surpass you in business". Either way, I can see both sides and I feel confident that at least a few of our banks would not blink an eye at making the loan. If the 2nd hotel fails, you've still got some really nifty apartments in an historic building. Sounds good to me!

Last edited by borninfarrington_g; September 10th, 2007 at 12:33 AM. Reason: My opinion was a little "brash"...
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Old September 10th, 2007, 12:36 AM   #160
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Sorry, upon further reading I concluded that my opinion was a little pushy. I just want to reiterate that everything after the 1st sentence is purely speculation. I do believe things like this happen in TH polotics all the time, however.
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