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Old October 31st, 2015, 02:35 PM   #1
TuzlaBoy
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Bosnian Medieval Architecture

Jajce old town
First mentioned 1363 as Bosnian king city
Jajce is an exceptional town among many other towns of mediaeval Bosnia. It is one of the few fortified settlements which was preserved with all the characteristics of the 15th century urban centre. Its fortress, ramparts, towers, bastions, and gates are on the area of an exceptional historical, artistic, aesthetic, symbolic, natural, documentary, scientific, and educational values. The girth of the mediaeval town of Jajce is about 1300 metres, and it takes up the area of 112000 square metres. The town fortification and defensive ramparts were built in several phases. The fortress is central building of the fortification. It was built early in the 14th century. There are two ramparts on the northern and western sides of the mediaeval town, and they are connected to the fortress. To the east of the fortress a catlle pound was built in the late 14th and early 15th centuries. The town ramparts were let down to the banks of the rivers in the period from the mid-15th century to 1463 when the royal court moved to Jajce. The Bear tower was built at the same time. The town got its final shape under the Ottoman rule (1527 – 1878). The Great Bastion, the tower on Dzikovac, Samic Bastion, Banja Luka Gate and Travnik Gate were built in the period from 17th to the early 19th century. In the same period a clock was set on the Clock Tower which was built in the Middle Ages. The Great Bastion on the northern ramparts is the most prominent building of the fortification, and the Banja Luka Gate figures prominently in its complex.The Travnik Gate and the Bear Tower (which got its name, as presumed, on account of its shape, firmness and size) are in the complex of the western ramparts.
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Old October 31st, 2015, 02:39 PM   #2
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Počitelj old town 1474
Stunningly nested above Neretva river, visit to Počitelj (“Počivati” - Bos.”to rest in peace”), easy uphill, one hour long walking activity, accompanied with a stories of town’s development and strategic importance during its 600+ year long written history and visit to most important sites such as Hajji Alija Mosque, Clock Tower and Gavrankapetanovic tower, IS A MUST, for anyone passing through or near Herzegovina region.


Unique, medieval, Ottoman era glorified, present day Ottoman-Mediterranean style architectured fortress - town Počitelj, is one of the very few urban ensembles in Bosnia and Herzegovina preserved in their integrity to the present times.
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Old October 31st, 2015, 02:43 PM   #3
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Mostar first time mentioned 1452
Human settlements on the river Neretva, between the Hum Hill and the Velež Mountain, have existed since prehistory, as witnessed by discoveries of fortified enceintes and cemeteries. Evidence of Roman occupation was discovered beneath the present town.

As far as medieval Mostar goes, although the Christian basilicas of late antiquity remained in use, few historical sources were preserved and not much is known about this period. The name of Mostar was first mentioned in a document dating from 1474, taking its name from the bridge-keepers (mostari); this refers to the existence of a wooden bridge from the market on the left bank of the river which was used by traders, soldiers, and other travelers. During this time it was also the seat of a kadiluk (district with a regional judge). Since Mostar was on the trade route between the Adriatic and the mineral-rich regions of central Bosnia, the settlement began to spread to the right bank of the river.

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Old November 1st, 2015, 01:45 AM   #4
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Noone interested except raj20. Ah no more waste of time for going further with towns.
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Old November 1st, 2015, 04:48 PM   #5
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TuzlaBoy, please go on! For sure there's a lot of people there interested in medieval architecture of Bosnia, especially as it's not really widely known and underrepresented on this forum. This beauty should be advertised better!
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 02:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
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Noone interested except raj20. Ah no more waste of time for going further with towns.
yes, please go on. Your posts are very interesting and thoughtful while providing a look at Bosnia many have not experienced. Thank you!!!
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 08:21 PM   #7
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Srebrenik old town (Gradina)
Srebrenik Fortress is Bosnia's best-preserved medieval castle dating from 1333. It is located in the outskirts of Srebrenik. The castle was occupied by the Ban of Bosnia Stjepan Kotromanić until his death in 1353. It was once considerably larger but some of its walls and structure have since collapsed. Also it is known for a document called "Povelja of Stjepan II Kotromanić" in which Stjepan gifts islands around island of Labin to Republic of Dubrovnik which is controversial by many residents in Srebrenik. Gradina is birth place of Tvrtko I Kotromanić first king of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 08:50 PM   #8
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Ostrozac castle in Cazin is real jewel of Krajina because it was populated for very long time with a different kinds of masters and every one of them give something special to the castle during rebuilding or renewal. Old documents informs us that Ostrozac is very old. Documents says that Ostrozac was built in 1286 AD and that is an official date of it's birth, but some historians claims that Ostrozac was mentioned by name Horosium or Hostosach in 405 BC. House of Babonjic princes ruled the Ostrozac before Ottoman arrival and there is a document found from 1403 AD with their seal roundly shaped with tower, eight corner star and a crescent moon with a Latin text "a comunitatis Ostrocensis".
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 09:04 PM   #9
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Vranduk fortress is an important fragment of medieval Bosnian history. Altough some historians claim that antic Arduba was built on the very place of todays Vranduk, that claim hasn't been scientifically proved yet. Vranduk was mentioned for the first time in March 1410. The Old town (fortress) Vranduk was piece of royal land where Bosnian kings Ostoja and Tvrtko II Tvrtkovic dwelled and there are also some traditional stories that the queen Katarina used to visit that place.

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Old November 3rd, 2015, 10:59 PM   #10
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what architectural influences would you say predominate Bosnia historic architecture?

Also, how much damage to the historic buildings occurred under the communist regime?
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Old November 4th, 2015, 12:21 AM   #11
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Quote:
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what architectural influences would you say predominate Bosnia historic architecture?

Also, how much damage to the historic buildings occurred under the communist regime?
First documents for Bosnian land is from Greek ages.
Bosnia were populated by Illyrian tribes and it had predominant Greek architecture.
Illyrian architecture was almost the same as Greek and Roman architecture. Thanks to its position Illyria was greatly influenced by those two countries. Illyrian buildings had regular shape and the main materials that were used were limestone and marble or gold for decorations.

The Illyrians were mentioned for the last time in the Miracula Sancti Demetrii during the 7th century.With the disintegration of the Roman Empire, Gothic and Hunnic tribes raided the Balkan peninsula, forcing many Illyrians to seek refuge in the highlands (Bosnia land) Daorson city was one of that settlements in the highlands of Bosnia. Influence of roman and greek architecture were till conquesting this teritory from Ottoman empire at 14 century, when a lot of eastern islam architecture came but only came as addons like building of mosques and etc inside towns and stay present till anexy of Bosnia from Austria at start of 19 century when central european arhitecture started to dominate.

Communist regime tried to preserve all historical sites, and it was very positive for historical and cultural heritage. Bosnian land were not a land of destruction in history so heritage stayed preserved, that's why three religons stayed mixed, from roman period catholicism, byzantium panslav and eastern islam.
That's why you have this in Bosnia as normal last war on this land were something that had bad influence on heritage.Sorry on my bad English
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Old November 7th, 2015, 07:53 AM   #12
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so beautiful
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Old November 8th, 2015, 01:14 PM   #13
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Bobovac is a fortified city of medieval Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is located near today's Vareš and the village of Borovica.

The city was built during the reign of Stephen II, Ban of Bosnia, and was first mentioned in a document dating from 1349. It shared the role of seat of the rulers of Bosnia with Kraljeva Sutjeska, however Bobovac was much better fortified than the other.

Bosnian King Stephen Tomašević moved the royal seat to Jajce during his war with the Ottoman Empire. The Ottomans invaded the city in 1463. Its fall hastened the Ottoman conquest of Bosnia.

Bobovac is now a protected cultural site.



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Old November 8th, 2015, 01:25 PM   #14
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One of the characteristics of the medieval Bosnian state is its special and traditional ruler title "Ban", that the Bosnian rulers used untill 1377 when Bosnia became kingdom and the title king replaced the title ban.
An analysis of the Illyrian language material confirms the presence of multi-word "Ban" in the Illyrian language.
In persian it means "Prince".

The first mention of a Bosnian ban is in 9th ct, the second time, Bosnian ban of unknown name is mentioned in 968 under attack of the Croatian King Kresimir II on Bosnia. Third ban of unknown name is mentioned around the 1041 as an ally of the Byzantine Emperor Constantine IX in the war against Doclea. Fourth ban Kotroman is mentioned in 1056, the fifth ban is one that the Doclean king Bodin removed during the attack on Bosnia in 1084. A ban Stijepan sat on the throne after 1084, with help from King Bodin of Doclea. Seventh ban of unknown name is mentioned in 1103 as brother in law of the Doclean ruler Kočapar.
And in 1141 is mentioned for the first time Ban Borič, and after him the famous Ban Kulin.

Bosnian Medieval Tombstones, was submitted for inscription on the World Heritage List in April 2011. Stećci or Stećaks are monolithic tombstones found on the entire territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Available data suggest that Stećci first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, with the first phase lasting throughout the 13th century. A period of the most intensive production and decoration were the 14th and 15th centuries. In the 16th century their use completely ceased. Out of 70,000 odd tombstones recorded at 3,300 odd sites, about 60,000 monuments are located in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 4,400 in Croatia, 3,500 in Montenegro and 4,100 in Serbia. Stećci fall into two main groups: recumbent and upright stone monoliths. Most tombstones are recumbent monoliths, which come in three types: slab, chest and gabled (sarcophagus-like). Upright stone monoliths come in the following types: stela, pillar (obelisk), cruciform and nišan.



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Old November 8th, 2015, 08:51 PM   #15
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Old November 8th, 2015, 08:54 PM   #16
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Old November 24th, 2015, 04:54 AM   #17
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Beautiful and very interesting. These buildings, castles and monuments have been preserved in excellent condition. Please post more
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“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
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Old November 24th, 2015, 04:57 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuzlaBoy View Post
Jajce old town
First mentioned 1363 as Bosnian king city
Jajce is an exceptional town among many other towns of mediaeval Bosnia. It is one of the few fortified settlements which was preserved with all the characteristics of the 15th century urban centre. Its fortress, ramparts, towers, bastions, and gates are on the area of an exceptional historical, artistic, aesthetic, symbolic, natural, documentary, scientific, and educational values. The girth of the mediaeval town of Jajce is about 1300 metres, and it takes up the area of 112000 square metres. The town fortification and defensive ramparts were built in several phases. The fortress is central building of the fortification. It was built early in the 14th century. There are two ramparts on the northern and western sides of the mediaeval town, and they are connected to the fortress. To the east of the fortress a catlle pound was built in the late 14th and early 15th centuries. The town ramparts were let down to the banks of the rivers in the period from the mid-15th century to 1463 when the royal court moved to Jajce. The Bear tower was built at the same time. The town got its final shape under the Ottoman rule (1527 – 1878). The Great Bastion, the tower on Dzikovac, Samic Bastion, Banja Luka Gate and Travnik Gate were built in the period from 17th to the early 19th century. In the same period a clock was set on the Clock Tower which was built in the Middle Ages. The Great Bastion on the northern ramparts is the most prominent building of the fortification, and the Banja Luka Gate figures prominently in its complex.The Travnik Gate and the Bear Tower (which got its name, as presumed, on account of its shape, firmness and size) are in the complex of the western ramparts.
This is absolutely stunning.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

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