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Old July 5th, 2009, 12:44 PM   #201
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Toronto's Royal Ontario Museum celebrates record one million visitors
22 March 2009
The Canadian Press

TORONTO - John Covaci was singled out Sunday as the 1 millionth visitor to walk through the Royal Ontario Museum's doors this fiscal year _ something that wouldn't have happened if his alarm went off on time.

The museum has never attracted more customers during a one-year period since it opened in 1914. ROM's fiscal year ends March 31.

Covaci, 26, of Hamilton, was running late for his date with his girlfriend, Adina Marcu, 25. He ended up at the ROM two hours behind schedule at 1:15 p.m., just in time to be the centre of the museum's record-breaking celebrations.

``I haven't been back here since grade school,'' said Covaci, who went to the ROM Sunday to check out a diamonds exhibit. ``I guess it was good that we showed up late. I think we'll be back every couple of months.''

Covaci received a complimentary one-year ROM family membership and dinner at the museum's c5 Restaurant, at the pinnacle of the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal.

ROM officials attribute the record attendance to the new Crystal, intriguing exhibits, and the galleries they're building, said museum spokesman Ania Kordiuk.

``This March Break, we've had over 70,000 people, an increase over last year, despite the economy,'' she said. ``There's something fresh here that keeps people coming back.''

The next highest general admission total was in 2001-2002 when 947,105 visited the ROM. The museum was then featuring an Asian dinosaur exhibit.

The third highest attendance total was in 1999-2000 when 905,000 went to the cultural institution.

The museum's next exhibit, which opens in June, is the Dead Sea Scrolls: World that Changed the World. It runs until January 2010.
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Old July 25th, 2009, 09:40 AM   #202
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Scrolls bring ROM back to life
Dead Sea artifacts draw scholars and public

25 June 2009
The Toronto Star

For budding scholars Eva Mroczek and Chad Stauber, the Dead Sea Scrolls are very much alive, especially now with a historic showing of the 2,000-year-old texts opening at the Royal Ontario Museum this weekend.

Gone, they say, are their days of being hidden away in a library, a windowless office or the back of a coffee shop sweating through a doctoral dissertation on the scrolls.

"Now that this is happening, everybody wants to know what we're doing," Mroczek said yesterday at a preview of the scrolls exhibit.

"We can talk about it at cocktail parties."

The exhibit opens officially on Saturday for a six-month show that also includes other artifacts from the Dead Sea and Jerusalem. The show includes eight fragments of the scrolls, discovered in caves around the Dead Sea in the 1940s.

They include the oldest known copies of the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament, and provide a window into the religious and cultural turmoil in Israel at the time, says Hindy Najman, director of the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto.

For Mroczek and Stauber, both PhD students with Najman focusing on how the scrolls were used and understood at the time of their writing, seeing the actual scrolls is invaluable to their studies.

"They loom so large in our minds," says Stauber. "But then, when you see them, they're pretty small."

That, he says, helps him understand how people used the scrolls 2,000 years ago, since a big scroll is handled differently from a small one. Mroczek is looking for evidence of how the scrolls were rolled, stored and even repaired by their original owners.

Scholarly pursuits aside, both admit they were a bit star-struck yesterday to finally see in person something that, until then, they had only seen in pictures and books.

"I don't know what to look at first," an excited Mroczek says.

The scrolls often have a profound effect on people.

While visiting Israel to put the show together, Julian Siggers witnessed people mesmerized at the site of the Dead Sea Scrolls, watching as they ran their fingers across the glass-protected text, trying to read the ancient Hebrew in which most of them are written.

"It's a profoundly moving thing to watch," Siggers, vice-president of programs and content communication at the ROM, told a Toronto Board of Trade audience recently.

As the oldest known copies of the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament, Siggers says, the scrolls are founding documents for the Jewish, Christian and Muslim faiths, or more than half the people on Earth.

Their visit to Toronto marks the relaunch of the ROM, says chief executive William Thorsell, after its massive renovation and the controversial addition of the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal to its Bloor St. facade, which changed the physical focus of the building. Inside, the ROM aims to be a centre of both rigorous academic research and public entertainment.

The scrolls, Thorsell says, are a perfect fit because they both engage scholars and captivate the public imagination.

"The museum is the modern agora," he told the board of trade. "We need a common ground, a place where we can go and say, 'This is mine, and yours.'"

An academic conference this fall will conclude with scholars spending an afternoon at the exhibit with area school children, talking to them about the scrolls and answering their questions, says Najman, who is organizing the conference.

Virtually everything about the scrolls is controversial, from who wrote them and why, to the riddle of how they ended up in caves along the Dead Sea, to the timing of both their hiding away in those caves to their rediscovery in the late 1940s.

Written and stored in the dying days of the Biblical state of Israel, they were again revealed to the world just as modern Israel was coming into being. As such, the scrolls hold enormous significance in the Jewish state, where they are seen as proof of a historic claim to the land.

The Palestinian Authority, however, claims the scrolls belong to their people, and were taken illegally from Palestinian territory.

Even the circumstances of their discovery 60 years ago is a source of some controversy.

The legend is that Bedouin shepherd Muhammed edh-Dhib found the scrolls in a cave while looking for lost sheep. Many scholars doubt the story, saying the 16-year-old probably made up the tale to hide his own tomb-raiding activities, a source of extra income for many poor Bedouins.
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Old November 29th, 2009, 07:16 PM   #203
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Visionary Thorsell needs new challenge
26 September 2009
The Toronto Star

Those who enjoy proclaiming their disdain for architect Daniel Libeskind and his Michael Lee-Chin Crystal as well as those who are fond of it will think of William Thorsell for decades to come every time they stroll along Bloor St. W.

In the wake of the announcement that he's stepping down as chief executive officer of the Royal Ontario Museum, many arts world insiders find it hard to believe Thorsell could be voluntarily walking away from such a great job.

But perhaps that's because they fail to grasp the essence of Thorsell's big picture. After all, he had a dream of remaking the ROM. Despite many obstacles and uproars, he went right ahead and did it. And now that he has just about completed the revolution he envisioned, what would be the point of sticking around to look after less intoxicating day-to-day details?

"In the museum world, it's very common for people associated with a huge project to leave when that project is over," explains Gail Dexter Lord, president of the Toronto-based museum consulting firm Lord Cultural Resources.

According to Lord, dreaming up a daring project and mastering the art of making it happen involves a particular skill set. You have to be visionary and single-minded.

Running a huge institution over the long term requires an entirely different mindset.

One thing the former editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail will never be accused of is sitting around wondering what to do with a dusty old fortress. In the summer of 2000, Thorsell wowed the search committee of the ROM's board - and was transformed from a man who wrote headlines to a man who made headlines.

Traditionalists were dismayed. After all, isn't a job like this supposed to be reserved for someone who has spent a lifetime in every nook and cranny of the museum world?

Thorsell did not fit that description. He was a scary visionary with the attitude of an outsider, a generalist and a non-specialist. He could see the ROM needed to be completely reinvented. His solution: Zap the museum and the city with the shock of the new.

Except for a few missteps, he proved to be a great communicator and masterly politician who could get everyone he needed on side.

"There aren't words to describe his great achievement," says Joey Tanenbaum, one of the city's leading philanthropists and a member of the ROM board. "The place was in disarray when he arrived, and he has proved to be its saviour. He gave it a sense of direction that no one will ever be able to duplicate."

Of course there were glitches. Costs soared. Reality checks forced design changes. Curators complained that the odd-angled spaces turned installing exhibits into a form of torture. There were times when Libeskind and Thorsell seemed to be in a folie a deux. And the building opened more than a year late, more or less empty.

Somehow, the owlish Thorsell seemed unflappable - even when a controversy over an ill-fated plan to raise money by building a condo tower on the site of the former planetarium, owned by the ROM, was hooted down, with Thorsell painted as the villain in a shameless money-grab. (That drama ended happily when the University of Toronto took over the site, writing a big enough cheque to meet the museum's needs.)

For an account of the agony and the ecstasy of a mammoth project, watch Kenton Vaughan's fascinating documentary The Museum.

Contrary to what the naysayers predicted, the numbers are turning out well. The museum raised an impressive $285 million for its Renaissance ROM expansion project. Annual admissions have increased to 1.1 million, and major gains have also been made in membership numbers, retail sales and other earned revenue.

A few predictions:

Thorsell's successor will be a lifetime museum pro, not a visionary.

Rather than retire to enjoy the scenery at his country house in the Mulmur Hills, northwest of Toronto, Thorsell will come up with a new vision and take on a new challenge.

His decade at the ROM will always be remembered as one of the most dramatic chapters in this city's cultural history.
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Old November 30th, 2009, 04:17 AM   #204
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Lookin good, the best place to pics from is from the McDonalds across the street on the top floor. I love just sitting there and eating and watching this thing go up.
I was registered at your forum. I have printed the test message. Do not delete, please.
Just wanted to say thanks to everyone for the warm/scary welcome,I'm really looking forward to talk about anything and everything horror related.
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Old January 4th, 2010, 05:56 PM   #205
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Toronto
beauty v. the beasts

26 December 2009
The Globe and Mail

THE GOOD

AGO, 2008:

Frank Gehry turned out a masterful reinvention that clarified the gallery's plan and suggested the warmth and shape of the body throughout.

ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART + DESIGN, 2004:

Will Alsop's decision to go futuristic is both hallucinatory and practical.

The reputation of Canada's oldest design school was instantly reborn.

MCKINSEY & COMPANY, 2000:

Hariri Pontarini Architects packed strength and honour into the threestorey building, creating alignments with U of T's Victoria College across the street and showing how, in careful hands, architecture in Toronto should never be thought of as strictly background.

THE BAD

LESLIE L. DAN PHARMACY BUILDING, 2006:

It happens to be at a major corner downtown but it could be anywhere. By day, the building is deadening. Many of the classes for undergraduate students are held underground, the windows are inoperable and there's not much in the way of serious sustainability. The wow factor comes at night when the lecture pods suspended in

the atrium are magically, colourfully lit.

THE UGLY

ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM, 2006:

It's a train wreck and we're not getting used to it.

Canadian headquarters, 2000:

Architecture that signalled a more sophisticated decade, Hariri Pontarini Architects packed strength and honour into the three-storey building, setting mahogany-framed windows where masonry corners might have been, opening a treed courtyard to the public, creating alignments with U of T's Victoria College across the street and . A random, coursing pattern for the Owen Sound limestone cladding was exquisitely designed by the architects, inspiring colleagues to respect the art of local stone. The architecture teaches something more: how a corporate building can assume the garb of the academy, and showing how, in careful hands, architecture in Toronto should never be thought of as strictly background.

Koerner Hall, Royal Conservatory of Music, 2009: Toronto is warming up. The sumptuous, 1,135-seat hall , designed by Marianne McKenna of KPMB Architects, caps a 20-year journey to remake the historic Canadian headquarters of the RCM. The Koerner Hall enlivens the classical shoebox-shape with a total, wood-warm experience: seating, balcony fronts and the seductive veil of twisting ribbons floating below the ceiling are all cut from white oak. The lobby space is graced by three storeys of glass, the better to look south along Philosopher's Walk to the CN Tower, and squint at the aluminum-clad shards of the redeveloped ROM, which looks better at night.

The bad

Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building, 2006: The globalized architecture of Norman Foster has conquered most of the planet. Foster + Partner's Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building presents the lightness of technology [JJ: CUT?: a TIGHTLY machined building skin and] a vertiginous atrium.

It happens to be at a major corner in downtown Toronto but it could be anywhere. By day, the building is deadening. The wow factor comes at night when the lecture pods suspended in the atrium are magically, colourfully lit. But there are cracks in the suave Foster ideology: Many of the classes for undergraduate students are held underground, the windows are inoperable and there's not much in the way of serious sustainability. For that, look next door to the research building with a lush bamboo garden inside its front hall. The Terence Donnelly CCBR, by Germany's Behnisch Architects with Architects Alliance of Toronto, treats sustainability and visual delight seriously. CityPlace, 2000 – Built by Condord Adex, the CityPlace Condo towers planted like a crop of green glow worms between Front Street and the Gardiner – . The pity is that a vertical field of sameness has been grafted onto the Toronto skyline. And, the tinted glass only transmits about 15 per cent of natural light inside – the connection to the sky is sacrificed, so what's the point of being up so high? A new park and community centre will help to soften the blow. Still, the sidewalks are mean and narrow. The Ugly Royal Ontario Museum, 2006: It's a train wreck and we're not getting used to it. Renaissance ROM – with apologies to Michelangelo and da Vinci – should have matched the architectural strength and honour of its original historic wings but, instead, Studio Daniel Libeskind in joint venture with Bregman + Hamann Architects preferred to assault the beloved museum with aluminum-clad shards and dimly lit interiors. It might have proven interesting as a rerun of Blade Runner if the sharply angled folly of structural steel hadn't disappeared under acres of drywall. At least, when visitors walk across the metal grating of the catwalks, there are sound effects: clang, clang, clang.

U of T Graduate Student Housing, 2000: Why be decent when architecture can be nasty? That must be the ideological nonsense behind this black concrete mask with skinny slits for eyes that has darkened Spadina Avenue for the past decade. Apparently, Morphosis Architects of Los Angeles, in joint venture with Teeple Architects Inc., wanted to re-educate the mind and the body by requiring hundreds of students to bend down to see out the windows of their western-facing bedrooms, and by daring them to relax in the highly exposed courtyard. The saving grace is the glazed light bar, visible for miles, cantilevered from the building's edge to hang halfway across Harbord Street. It's an extension of the building's skin and a compelling, in-your-face gateway to the University of Toronto.

And, looking forward: [JJ: WE DIDN'T ASK FOR THIS, COULD CUT THIS SECTION]

Central Waterfront Public Realm, 2008-Ongoing

The undulating timber wavedecks designed to connect Toronto's waterfront slips. Designed by the Dutch landscape firm, West 8 in joint venture with du Toit Allsopp Hillier, the wavedecks are undulating and steeply pitched, with special appeal for skateboarders. Importantly, for a waterfront that has been paralyzed by decades of banal development and nothingness, the interventions are fearless. Three wavedecks have already been built at the foot of Spadina, Rees and Simcoe Avenues. Five footbridges featuring heavy timber and sculptural designs are promised for the slips at Spadina, Peter, Rees, Police Basin and Simcoe.

Evergreen Commons at the Brick Works, 2010

Deep in the Don River valley, the Toronto Brick Works – a Victorian-era factory complex with once produced 43 million bricks a year – is being retained, restored and converted into a contemporary stage set on which organic market, Outward Bound climbing wall, and Jamie Kennedy food will combine and conspire to invigorate the eco-public.

Maple Leaf Gardens, 2011

The iconic hockey shrine built at the height of the Depression, is to be converted into a new Ryerson University Sports and Recreation Centre. An interior retrofit will mean a Loblaw supermarket on the ground floor, sports facilities for Ryerson on the second, and a skating rink on the third, just below the famous domed roof where Foster Hewitt announced the games for decades. Sounds like heaven.

The pressure was huge., determined to create a fitting monument to his hometown, might have produced a nightmare of constructed angst for the AGO. Or a screaming diva. In fact, Mr. Gehryand his right-hand man Craig Webb . How? They the new spacesMassive sky rooms bathe contemporary art and masterpieces from the Thomson art collection in a subtle democracy of light. Stretching the length of an entire city block, there is the great belly of the whale – the Galleria Italia – deserves to be baptized as Toronto's new, exhilarating living room.

As a billboard it's compelling. As a piece of branding it's genius.and lift the Sharpe Centre for Design nine stories off the groundboth: the elevated dream was neatly separated from the ordinary brick building that houses much of OCAD on the ground; and, between the splayed steel legs which help to support the hovering tabletop, there's a new urban plaza protected from the elements Now, under the new direction of Sara Diamond and with more students than it can accommodate, OCAD is looking to expand, possibly by attaching an addition underneath the floating, pixellated table top. Leave it alone. The medium is Alsop's message. Architecture that signalled a more sophisticated decade, setting mahogany-framed windows where masonry corners might have been, opening a treed courtyard to the public,. A random, coursing pattern for the Owen Sound limestone cladding was exquisitely designed by the architects, inspiring colleagues to respect the art of local stone. The architecture teaches something more: how a corporate building can assume the garb of the academy, and Koerner Hall, Royal Conservatory of Music, 2009: Toronto is warming up. The sumptuous, 1,135-seat hall , designed by Marianne McKenna of KPMB Architects, caps a 20-year journey to remake the historic Canadian headquarters of the RCM. The Koerner Hall enlivens the classical shoebox-shape with a total, wood-warm experience: seating, balcony fronts and the seductive veil of twisting ribbons floating below the ceiling are all cut from white oak. The lobby space is graced by three storeys of glass, the better to look south along Philosopher's Walk to the CN Tower, and squint at the aluminum-clad shards of the redeveloped ROM, which looks better at night.The globalized architecture of Norman Foster has conquered most of the planet. Foster + Partner's Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building presents the lightness of technology [JJ: CUT?: a TIGHTLY machined building skin and] a vertiginous atrium. inTorontoBut there are cracks in the suave Foster ideology: Many of the classes for undergraduate students are held underground, the windows are inoperable and there's not much in the way of serious sustainability. For that, look next door to the research building with a lush bamboo garden inside its front hall. The Terence Donnelly CCBR, by Germany's Behnisch Architects with Architects Alliance of Toronto, treats sustainability and visual delight seriously. CityPlace, 2000 – Built by Condord Adex, the CityPlace Condo towers planted like a crop of green glow worms between Front Street and the Gardiner – . The pity is that a vertical field of sameness has been grafted onto the Toronto skyline. And, the tinted glass only transmits about 15 per cent of natural light inside – the connection to the sky is sacrificed, so what's the point of being up so high? A new park and community centre will help to soften the blow. Still, the sidewalks are mean and narrow. Renaissance ROM – with apologies to Michelangelo and da Vinci – should have matched the architectural strength and honour of its original historic wings but, instead, Studio Daniel Libeskind in joint venture with Bregman + Hamann Architects preferred to assault the beloved museum with aluminum-clad shards and dimly lit interiors. It might have proven interesting as a rerun of Blade Runner if the sharply angled folly of structural steel hadn't disappeared under acres of drywall. At least, when visitors walk across the metal grating of the catwalks, there are sound effects: clang, clang, clang.

U of T Graduate Student Housing, 2000: Why be decent when architecture can be nasty? That must be the ideological nonsense behind this black concrete mask with skinny slits for eyes that has darkened Spadina Avenue for the past decade. Apparently, Morphosis Architects of Los Angeles, in joint venture with Teeple Architects Inc., wanted to re-educate the mind and the body by requiring hundreds of students to bend down to see out the windows of their western-facing bedrooms, and by daring them to relax in the highly exposed courtyard. The saving grace is the glazed light bar, visible for miles, cantilevered from the building's edge to hang halfway across Harbord Street. It's an extension of the building's skin and a compelling, in-your-face gateway to the University of Toronto.

And, looking forward: [JJ: WE DIDN'T ASK FOR THIS, COULD CUT THIS SECTION]

Central Waterfront Public Realm, 2008-Ongoing

The undulating timber wavedecks designed to connect Toronto's waterfront slips. Designed by the Dutch landscape firm, West 8 in joint venture with du Toit Allsopp Hillier, the wavedecks are undulating and steeply pitched, with special appeal for skateboarders. Importantly, for a waterfront that has been paralyzed by decades of banal development and nothingness, the interventions are fearless. Three wavedecks have already been built at the foot of Spadina, Rees and Simcoe Avenues. Five footbridges featuring heavy timber and sculptural designs are promised for the slips at Spadina, Peter, Rees, Police Basin and Simcoe.

Evergreen Commons at the Brick Works, 2010

Deep in the Don River valley, the Toronto Brick Works – a Victorian-era factory complex with once produced 43 million bricks a year – is being retained, restored and converted into a contemporary stage set on which organic market, Outward Bound climbing wall, and Jamie Kennedy food will combine and conspire to invigorate the eco-public.

Maple Leaf Gardens, 2011

The iconic hockey shrine built at the height of the Depression, is to be converted into a new Ryerson University Sports and Recreation Centre. An interior retrofit will mean a Loblaw supermarket on the ground floor, sports facilities for Ryerson on the second, and a skating rink on the third, just below the famous domed roof where Foster Hewitt announced the games for decades. Sounds like heaven.
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Old January 4th, 2010, 06:25 PM   #206
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Do you have a link to the Globe for the article? I am wondering who wrote it.
Thanks
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Old January 4th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #207
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taller, Better View Post
Do you have a link to the Globe for the article? I am wondering who wrote it.
Thanks
I didn't get this from the web edition. I got it from a newswire service. The only further information I can find online is : http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/decade/

The newswire edition did not list the author.
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Old January 5th, 2010, 07:49 PM   #208
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Thanks HK. I can't find it either, but thanks for the link!
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