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Old February 11th, 2016, 01:26 AM   #41
Woonsocket54
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Originally Posted by Alargule View Post
There are plenty of cities in the States with a surface light rail system. They seem to be in good working order.
The one notable exception is the MBTA, which is a huge embarrassment for Boston.
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Old February 11th, 2016, 02:03 AM   #42
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It depends on how you you define working order. If they can get the cars out of the yard and bring people to and from work, then they've succeeded.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 06:39 AM   #43
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By the way, I have built a CIM trolley bus line with a similar route to what the Mayor currently proposes.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 06:47 AM   #44
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http://gizmodo.com/more-convincing-p...mer-1758553177



While not many American cities are keen on gondolas, there is a proposed plan to build a similar cable car in New York. It’s called the East River Skyway, but getting it actually constructed requires substantial regulatory maneuvering, and obviously lots of money. Manhattan does have a tram that connects Manhattan to Roosevelt Island, so maybe that one tram will make getting another easier. Let’s hope so: Gondolas like Mi Teleférico could—and should—be the efficient, budget-friendly transit solution of the future.
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Old February 13th, 2016, 06:50 AM   #45
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http://gizmodo.com/more-convincing-p...mer-1758553177

More Convincing Proof We Need to Build Gondolas In American Cities

La Paz, Bolivia’s famous gondola system celebrates its second anniversary in May as a successful, low-cost travel option that moves 100,000 people per day. It’s also setting a global standard for a type of transportation that should be way more popular.

The gondola system serving the citizens of Bolivia’s capital city is called Mi Teleférico (“My Cable Car”), and it’s Guinness-certified as the longest system of its kind in the world. Rising nearly 1,000 feet in the air, the gondola is a quiet, safe, green alternative to the loud, crowded, polluted road route that connects La Paz and the nearby city of El Alto. Plus it looks fun as hell.

Right now, the government-bankrolled gondola network covers 6.2 miles, has 10 stations, and runs cars that arrive every 12 seconds. The fare is three bolivianos, or $0.40, and includes free wifi powered by solar panels on each car. It operates 17 hours a day, and not only helps locals get around, but it’s emerged as a huge tourist attraction. The Guardian recently interviewed La Paz locals who rave about the gondola system: “The views are great and it’s really fast,” one says. Can’t say the same when you’re sitting in the back of a bumpy bus staring out the window watching the KFCs roll by!

Twenty months later Mi Teleférico has been deemed a success: The three existing lines have reduced congestion and brought in big bucks—in the first 60 days, it made $1.2 million. The city’s already working with the Austrian cable car company Doppelmayr to build six more lines that’ll add over 14 miles and 23 more stations to the existing network.

So, why don’t other big cities areas have these wonder chair lifts toting humans through the air instead of herding them underground into aging subways? (Disney World doesn’t count.)

It’s tricky to build gondolas everywhere, though, as they’re ideally fit for certain conditions: “Ninety-nine percent of our cable cars are built in high mountainous areas with large slopes, landslide and glacial areas that are equal to or more complex than La Paz,” Javier Telleria, general manager of Doppelmayr, told The Guardian. But they’re still faster to build than light-rail and much cheaper than subways: La Paz’s chair lift cost $234 million, and New York’s Second Avenue subway costs a whopping $4.5 billion—and that’s just the first 1.5-mile segment!

While not many American cities are keen on gondolas, there is a proposed plan to build a similar cable car in New York. It’s called the East River Skyway, but getting it actually constructed requires substantial regulatory maneuvering, and obviously lots of money. Manhattan does have a tram that connects Manhattan to Roosevelt Island, so maybe that one tram will make getting another easier. Let’s hope so: Gondolas like Mi Teleférico could—and should—be the efficient, budget-friendly transit solution of the future.




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Old February 18th, 2016, 04:28 AM   #46
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70% is proposed to be separated. And the remaining 30% will be on quiet streets with room for streetcars.
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Old February 20th, 2016, 08:24 AM   #47
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Hey, folks. I will take this opportunity to explain why I deleted some posts here.

I totally understand the controversies and problems found in building a brand new light rail line in New York City, which is a really dense metropolis spanning five boroughs. And the fact that a few members have brought up issues that are way beyond the scope of the proposal has made at least one member irritated and angry about how the discussions have come along.

I am a city planner in the making, focusing on public transportation. And this project, as with any new mass transit project, will surely bring in tons of publicity, which can lead to problems and lawsuits later on if there are people willing to fight against the City and State governments. However, consider the fact that while New York City has an excellent public transportation, it still has some room for improvement and expansion, and that is where the Brooklyn-Queens Connector is: a way to improve connectivity alongside the fast-evolving and changing waterfront areas of Brooklyn and Queens/

I've already mentioned in an earlier post that this project will significantly impact several existing bus lines that currently operate along the proposed corridor, in which that would be a more appropriate discussion since its construction will certainly force the NYC MTA to reroute all those bus lines to give way to the construction. And by the way, some of those lines will see significant duplication that a better discussion could be "how will current circulation around such neighborhoods as Park Slope, Long Island City, and Astoria be affected by the project?".

I truly believe that this project will enhance the City's reputation as a mass transit paradise, a place where you can get to as many places as you want in a day, sometimes even round-the-clock (especially true if you live close to a subway line). And I believe that the Brooklyn-Queens Connector will expand the NYCMTA's repertoire of public transportation service to residents and tourists by giving them an alternative to the already-familiar subway and bus networks.
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Old February 21st, 2016, 11:54 PM   #48
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City may have to build new bridges over Gowanus Canal, Newtown Creek for streetcar

By Lauren Gill

Enlarge this image

Fantasy?: A rendering shows the proposed streetcar going over the Pulaski Bridge, but city honchos say they actually may have to build an entirely new one.

The city may have to build new bridges across the Gowanus Canal and Newtown Creek to accommodate the streetcar system Mayor DeBlasio wants to construct along the borough’s waterfront, officials revealed on Friday.
Planners factored in funds for the brand-new spans in the trolley’s projected $2.5-billion price tag in case they can’t run tracks across existing bridges, Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen told reporters during a press briefing touting the scheme.
“We took a very conservative approach and ensured even new bridges could be accommodat*ed,” said mayoral spokesman Wiley Norvell after the meeting, at which journalists were instructed not quote anyone verbatim.
The city still hasn’t announced the tram’s exact route from Sunset Park to Queens, but it will have to traverse both toxic waterways while coming in and out of Red Hook and Greenpoint.
Press materials show a mock-up of tracks going over Greenpoint’s Pulaski Bridge — where the city struggled for years to balance the weight of new bike paths with the drawbridge mechanism — but Glen acknowledged that may not actually be possible.
...
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Old May 10th, 2016, 09:33 AM   #49
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Waterfront Residents Weigh in on City's Proposed Brooklyn-Queens Connector Streetcar Line

By Ruschell Boone
Monday, May 9, 2016 at 11:22 PM EDT

It was a packed house inside the boys and girls club on 30th Road in Astoria, where dozens of people came looking for answers about the proposed Brooklyn-Queens Connector — also called the BQX.
It was the first public meeting held by the city's economic development corporation to talk about the Mayor's proposed $2.5 billion streetcar line — and there were many concerns.
"First of all, it sounds like an awful lot of money that's being spent that's only going to carry 45,000 riders a day," said one man who attended the meeting. "I'm worried about what construction is going to do."
"I'm curious about the route, the cost, who it's going to benefit," said a woman who attended the meeting.
The BQX would run along 16 miles of the waterfront between Sunset Park Brooklyn to Astoria Queens, at an estimated cost of $30 million a year. At the meeting, EDC representatives tried to address those issues
...
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Old May 10th, 2016, 05:36 PM   #50
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Still can't believe they're going ahead with this plan. It's a proposal built on lies and deceit.

Quote:
The BQX would, the report says, reduce travel times dramatically, though some of the travel calculations used to arrive at that conclusion have raised eyebrows.

The report calculates that the streetcar would cut 34 minutes from what it describes as 61-minute public transit trip from Williamsburg to Astoria. But Google maps puts the existing public transit time at somewhere in the 25- to 45-minute range.

Similarly, it argues that traveling from Queensbridge to the Navy Yard now takes 59 minutes, while the streetcar would take 27. But Google maps puts the trip by F train from Queensbridge South to Brooklyn Navy Yard in the 45-minute range.
http://www.capitalnewyork.com/articl...-outreach-plan
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Old May 18th, 2016, 07:08 AM   #51
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Birthday wishes

Happy 40th birthday to the Roosevelt Island Tramway (opened 1976.05.17)

https://twitter.com/afinelyne/status/732701155835404288
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Old July 21st, 2016, 01:57 AM   #52
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It appears a comedian has been hired to lead the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project.

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His sales pitch is well honed: “The subway was a 20th-century technology. Streetcars are a 21st-century technology, which is why all the fastest-growing cities in Asia and the Middle East are all looking at them.”
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer...ts-a-czar.html
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Old July 21st, 2016, 03:59 AM   #53
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They sure he won't try to sell us a genuine bona fide electrified six car monorail?
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Old July 21st, 2016, 04:16 AM   #54
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Only if we want to keep up with shelbyville.
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Old July 21st, 2016, 04:49 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
It appears a comedian has been hired to lead the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project.



http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer...ts-a-czar.html
I would say that he's pretty competent, marital issues aside. And I understand what he's trying to say. Its just that he doesn't phrase things very well. He's somewhat correct in arguing for the inclusion of less expensive and complex infrastructure projects, but he misses that both Arabia and Africa are also building subways at this time, even if they are outnumbered by the trams.

Then there's the fact that both subway and streetcar are 19th Century inventions.

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They sure he won't try to sell us a genuine bona fide electrified six car monorail?
He's definitely much more of a streetcar guy.
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Old July 26th, 2016, 12:58 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by Miami High Rise View Post
Only if we want to keep up with shelbyville.
He did wonders in Ogdenville and North Haverbrook. I will give him the benefit of the doubt.
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Old September 2nd, 2016, 05:19 AM   #57
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NEW YORK CITY | Tram

The BQX will be New York City’s first new rail system since the subway began service more than a century ago

What is the BQX? The BQX is a new, state-of-the-art streetcar system being planned by the City of New York[...]

Source:
Brooklyn-Queens Streetcar Is Gaining Steam With Officials

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Old September 2nd, 2016, 05:20 AM   #58
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De Blasio turns down streetcar boosters’ offer to split costs

Some deep-pocketed early supporters of a streetcar along the Brooklyn and Queens waterfront offered to pay for part of the ticket. But City Hall declined the ride[...]
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Old September 4th, 2016, 07:34 AM   #59
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Aerial cable cars have disadvantages though. Each station is a greater investment than a simple bus or light rail platform. There has to be cable machinery for each segment, and a rigid structure in between where cars queue for passenger boarding. Also the cables cannot turn by themselves. There has to be a steel guideway like a suspended monorail to take cars off one cable, around the turn, and onto another cable. Since they grip the outside of the cable relative to where the towers hold up the cable, that means they can't ride on the outside of a curve without some mechanical complexity. Usually stations are placed in bends in the line for this reason.

It make a lot of sense for La Paz because of how unique the geography of the city is. There are huge differences in elevation between neighborhoods. This also forms chokepoints for traffic. The cable car is literally the only direct way to travel between different points and before it was built it was hard to get around the city. Since it is a dense city in a poor country, a lot of people use public transit to begin with so naturally many of them ride the cable car.
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Old September 4th, 2016, 07:38 AM   #60
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Aerial cable cars are for tourism only.

The light rail should be built and operated by MTA.
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