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Old March 9th, 2005, 02:48 PM   #1
BVictor1
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Union Station Vertical Expansion | 26 fl | Pro

Height: Unknown
Floor count: 26
Location: West Adams and South Canal
Neighborhood: Loop
Construction end:
Architect: Lucien Lagrange Architects
Developer: Prime Group Realty Trust





INSIDE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
Union Station proposal may be back on track

THOMAS A. CORFMAN
Published March 9, 2005

Lincoln Property Co. is talking to potential tenants about a long-range proposal for a twin-tower office development on top of Union Station, a possible sign that the Dallas real estate firm will be Amtrak's choice as the new developer of the historic structure.

The selection of a developer has renewed urgency for cash-strapped Amtrak, after the Bush administration threatened last month to push the national passenger railroad into bankruptcy in order to force a restructuring.

Amtrak is looking for a new developer after a 2002 deal with Prime Group Realty Trust fell apart. A railroad spokesman declined to comment.

A final decision has not been made, and Amtrak could still turn to one of the Chicago-based finalists: residential firm Draper & Kramer Inc. or Jones Lang LaSalle Inc., which has a mixed-use proposal with about 500,000 square feet of office space, similar to a plan city officials have already approved.

But sources said Lincoln is proposing two towers of roughly 20 stories each on top of the station, which was designed by architect Daniel Burnham with upward expansion in mind. The towers, each with about 600,000 square feet of space, would be located along the north and south sides of the station, which occupies the block bounded by Jackson Boulevard and Canal, Clinton and Adams Streets.

Construction would not start until a tenant agreed to lease about half of a tower, with completion by 2009 at the earliest. The station's existing upper floors would be redeveloped into rental apartments, sources said.

Last edited by i_am_hydrogen; September 6th, 2011 at 08:12 PM. Reason: Added project info.
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Old March 10th, 2005, 01:40 AM   #2
The Urban Politician
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FAT chance of any commercial highrises being built in the current market. But it sounds good to me
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Old March 10th, 2005, 02:10 AM   #3
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If they do that, it had better be damn good architecture.
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Old March 10th, 2005, 02:34 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
FAT chance of any commercial highrises being built in the current market. But it sounds good to me
an admittedly weak commercial market, but can you imagine the marketability of buildings that would allow you to leave a Metra train and take an elevator up to your office?
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Old March 10th, 2005, 05:24 AM   #5
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^ I think the "Metra-ites" should be forced to walk to their office... Through the cold and wind and ice.... penance for living outside of the city and having to spend hours a day commuting....

OK, not really...
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24gotham - "Architecture should reflect the time in which it is built, not a previous time that may or may not have existed."

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Old March 10th, 2005, 05:51 AM   #6
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the building is to architecuraly significant to **** it up. i say leave it as is
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Old March 10th, 2005, 06:53 AM   #7
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I agree with wicked... there's pleanty of parking lots that need to be built on before they consider possibly mangling Union.
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Old March 10th, 2005, 01:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wickedestcity
the building is to architecuraly significant to **** it up. i say leave it as is
unless I'm mistaken, I thought that a high rise portion was actually a part of the original plan. Does anyone know if that's right?
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Old March 10th, 2005, 06:48 PM   #9
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You're correct edsg, that was in the original design. A decade ago there were renderings of the two towers and they integrated beautifully with the classical architecutre of the station. There was also some ingenious engineering involved in canterlevering, if memory serves after so long.
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Old January 10th, 2006, 11:37 PM   #10
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Union Station...expansion revisited

Union Station expansion revisited
January 10, 2006
BY DAVID ROEDER Business Reporter

Amtrak is wrapping up an agreement with Chicago real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle Inc. that would revive efforts to expand and spruce up Chicago's landmark Union Station.

The proposal calls for an 18-story addition to the eight-story building at 210 S. Canal, which is owned by Amtrak, the federally charged passenger railroad. Jones Lang would pick up a prior development plan that foundered because of another real estate firm's financial trouble.

City landmarks officials approved the plan in 2002, concluding that it fulfilled the intent of Union Station's designers, an architectural firm whose lineage goes back to Chicago visionary Daniel Burnham. If the design works, it could make the Neo-classical station a commercial and residential draw for a fringe area of downtown.

About 1.25 million square feet would be added to the building with no alterations to its Great Hall waiting room, regarded as one of the finest public spaces in the United States.


Capable of supporting more floors than are there now, the newest planned expansion of Union Station would add 18 stories (above), but be true to the original design.
Appearing massive from the outside, the latest Union Station plans would feature an atrium and be fairly airy.


Nothing is planned that should affect passenger concourses or train platforms. But adding that volume of space will be a hard sell in a market where residential condominiums are the only quick sellers, provided they aren't priced too richly.

The proposal would blend condos with a hotel and office space in the addition.

A source said the project is tentatively budgeted at up to $275 million. Backers believe condo prices and lease rates for the offices can be held below market levels because of tax advantages and other cost savings that come from renovating a landmark.

The office floors "will be absolutely the finest and most modern available, with rentals that beat the competition by $4 to $5 a square foot," a source said.

Amtrak and Jones Lang are negotiating a letter of understanding that sources said would give Jones Lang about a year to work on the development. If it appears likely to move ahead, Amtrak would then agree to two successive 99-year deals to lease the station to Jones Lang and a related venture, sources said.

Partners in the venture are Hossein Youssefi, a Jones Lang managing director who will lead the project, and former Jones Lang executive Stuart Scott.

The architect for the expansion would be Chicago's Lucien Lagrange, who directed 1992 improvements at Union Station.

The railroad had conducted prolonged talks with two Union Station suitors. Besides Jones Lang, Lincoln Property Co. was interested in an alliance with architect James Goettsch.

The Lincoln plan could have raised more money for Amtrak, but was far more risky. Sources said it called for two new high-rise additions to the base, and would have required approval by city landmark authorities, which can come only after a hearing process that takes months.

Youssefi carried out successful renovations at Washington, D.C.'s Union Station and Grand Central Station in New York.

In a press release, David Hughes, Amtrak's acting president and chief executive, said, "We hope this project will realize the original architect's vision for the station as a vital center of life and activity in the West Loop."

Lagrange is known for his historic renovations, such as his work on the Carbide & Carbon Building at 230 N. Michigan that became the Hard Rock Chicago hotel, and for new buildings that include Park Tower at 800 N. Michigan.

Chicago's Union Station was built in stages from 1913 to 1925 and finished by the firm Graham, Anderson, Probst & White after Burnham started it. The architects envisioned a high-rise section that was never built, but the structure has a foundation strong enough to support it.

In 2002, Amtrak had an agreement with Prime Group Realty Trust to pursue the Union Station project, but financial hardship forced the then publicly traded company to abandon speculative ventures. Prime Group eventually was sold to a buyer who took it private.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 12:01 AM   #11
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Ok, now that there's a specific thread:

A little more on the Union Station project:

http://globest.com/news/450_450/chicago/141836-1.html

Union Station Topper Plan Rises Again
By Mark Ruda

Last updated: January 10, 2006 05:55am

Jones Lang LaSalle and two former executives of the real estate firm are the latest to attempt to bring Daniel Burnham’s vision for Union Station to its long-awaited fruition. Amtrak subsidiary Chicago Union Station Co. is giving Jones Lang LaSalle and its partner, Youssefi-Scott Development Co., a chance to strike a $250-million redevelopment deal that would add an 18-story tower atop the 80-year-old railroad terminal.


Most recently, Prime Group Realty Trust proposed a $200-million mixed-use project that would have added 180 condominiums, 400 hotel rooms as well as 500,000 sf of office space above the Union Station’s Headhouse Building. Before the REIT’s financial crunch derailed the project, it had hired architect Lucien LaGrange, who ironically had drawn up plans about 20 years earlier for another developer before Tax Reform Act of 1986 torpedoed US real estate markets.

Burnham’s designs included a tower above the station, but he died before the station was completed. Jones Lang LaSalle has been involved in the redevelopment of two other buildings designed by Burnham, Symphony Center in Chicago and Union Station in Washington, DC.

“Our goal is to perpetuate Burnham’s historic vision for Union Station and at the same time create a state-of-the-art, mixed-use facility that includes office space built for the 21st century,” says Hossein Youssefi, whose company also includes Stuart Scott. “Union Station will be an architectural jewel as we extend the Burnham Chicago tradition to the West Loop.”


Bounded by Clinton, Canal, Jackson and Adams streets, Union Station already is Metra’s busiest commuter rail station, serving 120,000 passengers a day in addition to more than 6,000 Amtrak riders. The Jones Lang LaSalle partnership envisions preserving the Great Hall, exterior and rooflines. The redevelopment is not expected to affect Amtrak and Metra operations, but would convert 500,000 sf of vacant railroad offices into new uses.

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Old January 11th, 2006, 01:28 AM   #12
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I really love it. I wonder if there is going to be like a public area in the lower levels the new addition. Also it would be cool if they made the roof of the old station a kind of patio or garden for the public (some place really cool to sit outside and not stray far from the station for those who have to wait for Amtrak trains).

I would love some classical or even maybe some gothic ornimentation on the outside of the new building but some could rightly argue that would be over the top or gaudy. From what I see I love it though.

From the renderings how high would one guess the new addition would be? 250-350 ft?
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Old January 11th, 2006, 01:36 AM   #13
BVictor1
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Here's a thread on the Union Station expansion. I believe that the 2 should be merged. There's no reason to have a double thread.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 01:36 AM   #14
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I don't think we knew there was one March....
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Old January 11th, 2006, 01:37 AM   #15
BVictor1
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Union Station expansion revisited
January 10, 2006
BY DAVID ROEDER Business Reporter

Amtrak is wrapping up an agreement with Chicago real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle Inc. that would revive efforts to expand and spruce up Chicago's landmark Union Station.

The proposal calls for an 18-story addition to the eight-story building at 210 S. Canal, which is owned by Amtrak, the federally charged passenger railroad. Jones Lang would pick up a prior development plan that foundered because of another real estate firm's financial trouble.

City landmarks officials approved the plan in 2002, concluding that it fulfilled the intent of Union Station's designers, an architectural firm whose lineage goes back to Chicago visionary Daniel Burnham. If the design works, it could make the Neo-classical station a commercial and residential draw for a fringe area of downtown.

About 1.25 million square feet would be added to the building with no alterations to its Great Hall waiting room, regarded as one of the finest public spaces in the United States.


Capable of supporting more floors than are there now, the newest planned expansion of Union Station would add 18 stories (above), but be true to the original design.
Appearing massive from the outside, the latest Union Station plans would feature an atrium and be fairly airy.


Nothing is planned that should affect passenger concourses or train platforms. But adding that volume of space will be a hard sell in a market where residential condominiums are the only quick sellers, provided they aren't priced too richly.

The proposal would blend condos with a hotel and office space in the addition.

A source said the project is tentatively budgeted at up to $275 million. Backers believe condo prices and lease rates for the offices can be held below market levels because of tax advantages and other cost savings that come from renovating a landmark.

The office floors "will be absolutely the finest and most modern available, with rentals that beat the competition by $4 to $5 a square foot," a source said.

Amtrak and Jones Lang are negotiating a letter of understanding that sources said would give Jones Lang about a year to work on the development. If it appears likely to move ahead, Amtrak would then agree to two successive 99-year deals to lease the station to Jones Lang and a related venture, sources said.

Partners in the venture are Hossein Youssefi, a Jones Lang managing director who will lead the project, and former Jones Lang executive Stuart Scott.

The architect for the expansion would be Chicago's Lucien Lagrange, who directed 1992 improvements at Union Station.

The railroad had conducted prolonged talks with two Union Station suitors. Besides Jones Lang, Lincoln Property Co. was interested in an alliance with architect James Goettsch.

The Lincoln plan could have raised more money for Amtrak, but was far more risky. Sources said it called for two new high-rise additions to the base, and would have required approval by city landmark authorities, which can come only after a hearing process that takes months.

Youssefi carried out successful renovations at Washington, D.C.'s Union Station and Grand Central Station in New York.

In a press release, David Hughes, Amtrak's acting president and chief executive, said, "We hope this project will realize the original architect's vision for the station as a vital center of life and activity in the West Loop."

Lagrange is known for his historic renovations, such as his work on the Carbide & Carbon Building at 230 N. Michigan that became the Hard Rock Chicago hotel, and for new buildings that include Park Tower at 800 N. Michigan.

Chicago's Union Station was built in stages from 1913 to 1925 and finished by the firm Graham, Anderson, Probst & White after Burnham started it. The architects envisioned a high-rise section that was never built, but the structure has a foundation strong enough to support it.

In 2002, Amtrak had an agreement with Prime Group Realty Trust to pursue the Union Station project, but financial hardship forced the then publicly traded company to abandon speculative ventures. Prime Group eventually was sold to a buyer who took it private.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 03:13 AM   #16
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I like the design. I hope they can actually pull it off... Train stations really need to be very impressive. This is often a person's first impression of a city.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 03:58 AM   #17
nomarandlee
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Is it me or does it look like the sides are slightly inclined of the proposed addition? Or is that an opitcal illusion of the rendering? If yes do you like it?
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Old January 12th, 2006, 07:05 PM   #18
rgolch
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ontact:
Rick Harnish Office: 773-334-6758
Executive Director Cell: 312-339-0116
Midwest High Speed Rail Association www.midwesthsr.org

Statement Regarding Union Station Redevelopment

Earlier today, Amtrak announced an agreement with Jones Lang LaSalle to
redevelop the headhouse building of Chicago’s Union Station. This
presents an excellent opportunity to relieve the crowded conditions
that Amtrak passengers face when boarding trains leaving Chicago.

Steady growth in Amtrak ridership over the last four years has resulted
in overflow crowds in the small trackside waiting rooms. Passengers
are forced to snake through a maze of benches and into the hallway as
they queue up for their trains, some of which leave Chicago with more
passengers than a 747.

The proposed redevelopment creates an opportunity to prepare for the
tremendous growth in passenger volumes expected in the coming decade.
Moving the ticket counters and the customer service areas from the
concourse area and into the headhouse will allow the waiting rooms to
be expanded while improving traffic flows in the planned retail
development.

If the current proposals for fast and dependable trains linking Chicago
to the Midwest are completed, Chicago’s Union Station will become
busier than 85% of the nation’s airports and approach the economic
impact of Midway airport.

The City of Chicago should seize this once in a generation opportunity
and work with Amtrak to create a world-class gateway linking Chicago to
the entire Midwest.
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Old January 12th, 2006, 09:17 PM   #19
nomarandlee
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If high speed rail ever did catch on in the U.S. or at least the mid-west (LONG ways off I know) does anyone else think that Union Station could become obsolete?
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Old January 13th, 2006, 07:56 AM   #20
The Urban Politician
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgolch
ontact:
Rick Harnish Office: 773-334-6758
Executive Director Cell: 312-339-0116
Midwest High Speed Rail Association www.midwesthsr.org

Statement Regarding Union Station Redevelopment

Earlier today, Amtrak announced an agreement with Jones Lang LaSalle to
redevelop the headhouse building of Chicago’s Union Station. This
presents an excellent opportunity to relieve the crowded conditions
that Amtrak passengers face when boarding trains leaving Chicago.

Steady growth in Amtrak ridership over the last four years has resulted
in overflow crowds in the small trackside waiting rooms. Passengers
are forced to snake through a maze of benches and into the hallway as
they queue up for their trains, some of which leave Chicago with more
passengers than a 747.

The proposed redevelopment creates an opportunity to prepare for the
tremendous growth in passenger volumes expected in the coming decade.
Moving the ticket counters and the customer service areas from the
concourse area and into the headhouse will allow the waiting rooms to
be expanded while improving traffic flows in the planned retail
development.

If the current proposals for fast and dependable trains linking Chicago
to the Midwest are completed, Chicago’s Union Station will become
busier than 85% of the nation’s airports and approach the economic
impact of Midway airport.

The City of Chicago should seize this once in a generation opportunity
and work with Amtrak to create a world-class gateway linking Chicago to
the entire Midwest.
^ I LOVE reading stuff like that
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