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Old April 23rd, 2016, 01:00 PM   #21
Gag Halfrunt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
I don't know about that. The VLocity looks pretty bulky and American to me-it is by Bombardier, you know.
A lot of Japanese commuter EMUs look American, in the sense that they tend to have unpainted metal bodies and utilitarian styling, but they are much lighter than American trains.
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Old April 23rd, 2016, 04:25 PM   #22
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A lot of Japanese commuter EMUs look American, in the sense that they tend to have unpainted metal bodies and utilitarian styling, but they are much lighter than American trains.

Japan operates on a loading gauge that is only 3/4 the size of the American one. They also have considerably less interaction with freight traffic.

And I was talking about Australia, not Japan.
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Old April 23rd, 2016, 09:20 PM   #23
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The point I intended to make is "looking American" doesn't necessarily mean that a train must be heavy. As for the VLocity trains, they are built in Australia but their bogies are imported from the Bombardier's UK factory in Derby. This rather suggests that if they have any foreign design ancestry it is British rather than North American.
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Old April 24th, 2016, 12:13 AM   #24
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A bogie does not a frame make.
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Old April 24th, 2016, 08:21 AM   #25
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Old April 24th, 2016, 08:43 AM   #26
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Anyone know the purpose of the inner third rail in the picture above? It's on a straight section rather than on a curve or on a bridge section, where these are used as guard rails (against derailment). Perhaps part of the signaling system?
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Old April 24th, 2016, 04:50 PM   #27
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What I would like to know is why the platform is skewed over to the left side of building. Are they leaving room for a second platform?
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Old April 24th, 2016, 06:33 PM   #28
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Quote:
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What I would like to know is why the platform is skewed over to the left side of building. Are they leaving room for a second platform?
Future expansions im told by SSP Denver users.... It drives me crazy to have it off center...
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Old April 25th, 2016, 04:17 AM   #29
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I believe that's where the proposed HSR line will be built.
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Old April 28th, 2016, 12:56 PM   #30
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Old April 28th, 2016, 12:57 PM   #31
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I believe that's where the proposed HSR line will be built.
From Where to Where?
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Old April 28th, 2016, 04:09 PM   #32
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From Where to Where?
I've heard lines proposed running from Denver to Albuquerque and Salt Lake City (yes, I know its on the other side of the Rockies-there's a proposal anyways).
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Old April 28th, 2016, 08:02 PM   #33
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Commuter Rail Systems

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Old April 28th, 2016, 09:00 PM   #34
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'Life stages' of a new commuter rail vehicle

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Old April 29th, 2016, 01:42 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
I've heard lines proposed running from Denver to Albuquerque and Salt Lake City (yes, I know its on the other side of the Rockies-there's a proposal anyways).
Err... only at the most basic of levels. Like "Golly gee, wouldn't it be great to have a line like this" type proposals from grassroots organizations. But on the official side like the US HSR corridors, Denver never even got a mention:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-s...il_Initiatives

And even then, any line coming out of Denver would be running out of Union Station, not the airport station.
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Old April 29th, 2016, 09:33 AM   #36
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The rail cars have a top speed of 79mph and will be capable of accommodating up to 200 passengers and it also includes construction of 122-miles of commuter rail and light rail, 18-miles of bus rapid-transit service, 21,000 new parking spaces.


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Old April 30th, 2016, 02:36 AM   #37
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Old April 30th, 2016, 04:34 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
Japan operates on a loading gauge that is only 3/4 the size of the American one. They also have considerably less interaction with freight traffic.

And I was talking about Australia, not Japan.
Just as an example (and I'm using these because I can find weight info on them):

(1) The New South Wales Xplorer, the direct ancestor of the Bombardier V/Locity, weighs 63 short (imperial) tons.
(2) The Silverliner V weighs 73.3 short tons.

Keep in mind that DMUs are normally heavier than EMUs (DMUs carry their fuel onboard; EMUs don't), so this comparison is biased towards the EMU. Then what does the fact that the Australian DMU weighs 85% of the American EMU tell you?

Incidentally, the Budd RDC, which was a product of the 1950s (!!) and remains the last truly successful American DMU, weighed 56.56 short tons. What does that tell you? Especially since steam engines were always an order of magnitude heavier than diesels have ever been?
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Old April 30th, 2016, 05:29 AM   #39
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It tells me that trains in general have been getting heavier.

If there has been a significant increase in weight due to safety restrictions that are recently added, then those safety restrictions have a cogent reason. New safety systems have a purpose-the people responsible don't do this on a whim.

I have ridden both RDCs and Silverliner Vs. The former feels outright flimsy in some ways in comparison to the latter (though the car shell is absurdly resistant to weathering it doesn't exactly stand up well to impacts). The Silverliner V has better sound insulation, better seats, better doors (power doors weigh more than manual doors on the RDC), better crush-proofing, better acceleration, better braking.

Let's compare two automobiles from the same market segment and from the same company roughly contemporary in design to the two railcars:

1948 Mercury Eight: 3,400 lbs

2010 Ford Taurus: 4,015 lbs

So, things in general can get heavier over time due to added features and improved performance. It happens. Some of these improve safety, some improve other things.
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Old April 30th, 2016, 02:36 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Just as an example (and I'm using these because I can find weight info on them):

(1) The New South Wales Xplorer, the direct ancestor of the Bombardier V/Locity, weighs 63 short (imperial) tons.
(2) The Silverliner V weighs 73.3 short tons.

Keep in mind that DMUs are normally heavier than EMUs (DMUs carry their fuel onboard; EMUs don't), so this comparison is biased towards the EMU. Then what does the fact that the Australian DMU weighs 85% of the American EMU tell you?

Incidentally, the Budd RDC, which was a product of the 1950s (!!) and remains the last truly successful American DMU, weighed 56.56 short tons. What does that tell you? Especially since steam engines were always an order of magnitude heavier than diesels have ever been?
Some Australian EMUs

Melbourne X'Trapolis - 43.34 tonnes (Driving motor), 35.47 tonnes (Trailer)
Perth B Series - 120 t (120 long tons; 130 short tons) - 72m 3 car set

A lot lighter
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