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Old May 19th, 2016, 11:43 PM   #1
micro
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MISC | Maglev Metros/Subways

Shanghai Airport Maglev, Nagoya's Linimo, Incheon Airport link -- now there are three of them: Maglev metros. Changsha Airport Link and and Beijing's S1 commuter train are to follow this year.

New metrobits page with more facts: Maglev Metros

Code:
Shanghai	Maglev (airport link)		2004		30.5 km	2 stations	7 minutes	431 km/h	
Nagoya	Linimo, Tobu Kyuryo Line (metro)	6 Mar 2005	8.9 km	9 stations	17 minutes	100 km/h
Incheon	Airport Maglev (airport service)	3 Feb 2016	6.1 km	6 stations	15 minutes	110 km/h	
Changsha	Maglev Express (airport link)	6 May 2016	18.6 km	3 stations	19.5 minutes	120 km/h	
Beijing		S1 (commuter metro)		Dec 2016	18.9 km	8 stations	10 minutes	110 km/h
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Old May 20th, 2016, 12:34 AM   #2
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As you can easily guess from the few technical features shown in the table above, the first line (Shanghai Airport Transrapid) is clearly out of place in the list, being a high speed railway link and not a metro under whatsoever respect.
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Old May 20th, 2016, 05:39 AM   #3
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Ok, it's disputable, there are points for as well as points against putting Shanghai Maglev in the list of urban transport. What to call a metro will always be disputable, anyways, and similar is true for commuter rails. I wanted to have Shanghai Maglev in the list in order to compare it with the other ones, and because it links the city with its airport, just like airport links in other cities do, and like Shanghai's metro line 2, just faster.

Airports are an essential and integral part of cities, even though they are often located outside city boundaries. So I included Shanghai Maglev here though many people might say it's not a metro, it's too fast for being a metro or whatever. At least it's kind of a commuter metro, and Metrobits includes those in some of its theme pages. Speed is not part of the metro definition, by the way.

Intercity transport like Chuo Shinkansen of course would not fit in the list.
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Old May 20th, 2016, 03:15 PM   #4
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I wonder if there are more Maglevs under construction than those above and the Chuo Shinkansen. I couldn't find any.

Is it a future technology or not?
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Old May 20th, 2016, 07:19 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micro View Post
Ok, it's disputable, there are points for as well as points against putting Shanghai Maglev in the list of urban transport. What to call a metro will always be disputable, anyways, and similar is true for commuter rails. I wanted to have Shanghai Maglev in the list in order to compare it with the other ones, and because it links the city with its airport, just like airport links in other cities do, and like Shanghai's metro line 2, just faster.

Airports are an essential and integral part of cities, even though they are often located outside city boundaries. So I included Shanghai Maglev here though many people might say it's not a metro, it's too fast for being a metro or whatever. At least it's kind of a commuter metro, and Metrobits includes those in some of its theme pages. Speed is not part of the metro definition, by the way.

Intercity transport like Chuo Shinkansen of course would not fit in the list.
I'm well aware that in some case deciding whether a line/system is a metro or not is highly debatable: when its features lies on the border between metros and LRT/tramways, commuter/suburban railways or people mover/connector and therefore it may meet some criteria and not others. I'm sorry, but this isn't the case: Shanghai Transrapid has nothing to do with metro class.
I pointed out how fast it runs as a sort of warning light: it's true that speed per se is not a part of metro definition (however, such a speed can't be reached within the range of service a metro provide), but it's a parameter that jump out in the list, remarking there's something wrong. Plus, I didn't write speed, but technical features: also a 30 km spacing between stations is something that don't fit with metro at all (although maybe only an expert observer can tell).

Shanghai Maglev line commercial operations have a 15' headway (20' off-peak), but the system minimum headway is 10'; with their train-wise internal layout, SMT five-section vehicles can carry 440 passengers each, which means maximum line capacity is 2˙640 pass/h per direction (1˙760 pass/h with the current schedule). Conversely, the overall capacity of a metro line is four (light metro) to sixteen time bigger than this; a 10' operational headway performance constitutes the bare minimum for a metro/rapid transit, with less than 4' as a technical limit for the line (less than 90” for a driverless one), and an average “heavy metro” train (100÷120 m versus ~130 m for T08 Shanghai Maglev) is also nearly three time more capacious.
Furthermore, this is a point to point dedicated service: outside the scope of a metro line, which is intended to serve as a urban transit backbone. Also the argument that airports are an essential and integral part of cities is rather irrelevant: there are a lot of essential urban destination around the world that aren't reached by a metro, and also a lot of airport links that consist in a commuter or main railway line (some of them are conventional high speed line, one being for the other Shanghai international airport, Hongquiao SHA).
IMHO, this is more than enough to prove my point.
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Old May 20th, 2016, 10:54 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yak79 View Post
also a 30 km spacing between stations is something that don't fit with metro at all
But if you consider the journey time of just 7 minutes, it might fit better, doesn't it?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yak79 View Post
IMHO, this is more than enough to prove my point.
I don't disagree with you. It's just, Metrobits intentionally avoids a nerdy perspective on metros in favour of a somewhat playful passengers' or even artistic view on them. I've been riding Shanghai Maglev a couple of times, you don't notice the speed (if you don't look at the monitor), and it swooshes you in no time from the airport to the city.

In case the line gets extended to Hangzhou as proposed, I'd reconsider it belonging in the list, but for now I'd like to keep it in, just to have the facts in place and make it easier to compare with the other urban maglevs.

By the way, Shenzhen's line 8 was supposed to become a maglev line, but after protests of residents will now be built as a monorail, very sad news in my eyes. I wonder if there is anything true with the assumed "health hazards" or if it's just plain superstition.

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/872015.shtml
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