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Old June 14th, 2016, 04:37 AM   #1
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Roman Empire in the European Cities

COLOSSEUM - ROME




On all of the things you can see from the Roman Empire in the city of Rome, the best of the best is definitely the Colosseum, who also acts today as the starting point of the ruins of the ancient culture, being just in front of the Roman Forum and then the Circus Maximus. As you may see, one of the halfs of the Colosseum survived for milleniums. This is where the entrance is and by the way, it closes at 3:30 PM, so it’s better to get there in the morning to get sure you’re gonna enter. This huge place was built in order to give bloody spectacles to the people, in a strategic move from the emperors to maintain the peace in a society that was quite violent (like almost every society at those times). It was probably better explained by Game of Thrones: “if you don’t give people entertainment, they will get it themselfs”. Paradoxically, after hundreds of years of gladiators killing each other on the famous arena, the Colosseum was then used by the Catholic Church. It is still used today by the Pope on the ceremony of the Good Friday every year.















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Old June 14th, 2016, 04:39 AM   #2
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On HD:


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Old June 26th, 2016, 04:37 AM   #3
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ROMAN PANTHEON - ROME




The Pantheon is a building in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier building commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). The present building was completed by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. He retained Agrippa's original inscription, which has confused its date of construction. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 metres (142 ft). It is one of the best-preserved of all Ancient Roman buildings, in large part because it has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" (Latin: Santa Maria ad Martyres) but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda". The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda. The Pantheon is a state property, ruled by Italy's Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism through the Polo Museale del Lazio; in 2013 it was visited by over 6 million people.
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Old June 30th, 2016, 05:42 AM   #4
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CASTEL SANT'ANGELO - ROME




The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant'Angelo is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano, Rome, Italy. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum. The Castle was once the tallest building in Rome. The tomb of the Roman emperor Hadrian, also called Hadrian's mole, was erected on the right bank of the Tiber, between 134 and 139 AD. Originally the mausoleum was a decorated cylinder, with a garden top and golden quadriga. Hadrian's ashes were placed here a year after his death in Baiae in 138, together with those of his wife Sabina, and his first adopted son, Lucius Aelius, who also died in 138. Following this, the remains of succeeding emperors were also placed here, the last recorded deposition being Caracalla in 217. The urns containing these ashes were probably placed in what is now known as the Treasury room deep within the building. Hadrian also built the Pons Aelius facing straight onto the mausoleum – it still provides a scenic approach from the center of Rome and the right bank of the Tiber, and is renowned for the Baroque additions of statues of angels holding aloft elements of the Passion of Christ.

Some shots inside the castle:










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Old June 30th, 2016, 05:43 AM   #5
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Old July 8th, 2016, 04:19 AM   #6
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PALATINE HILL & ROMAN FORUM




The Roman Forum is a rectangular forum (plaza) surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient government buildings at the center of the city of Rome. Citizens of the ancient city referred to this space, originally a marketplace, as the Forum Magnum, or simply the Forum. It was for centuries the center of Roman public life: the site of triumphal processions and elections; the venue for public speeches, criminal trials, and gladiatorial matches; and the nucleus of commercial affairs. Here statues and monuments commemorated the city's great men. The teeming heart of ancient Rome, it has been called the most celebrated meeting place in the world, and in all history. Located in the small valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, the Forum today is a sprawling ruin of architectural fragments and intermittent archaeological excavations attracting 4.5 million sightseers yearly. Many of the oldest and most important structures of the ancient city were located on or near the Forum. The Roman kingdom's earliest shrines and temples were located on the southeastern edge. These included the ancient former royal residence, the Regia (8th century BC), and the Temple of Vesta (7th century BC), as well as the surrounding complex of the Vestal Virgins, all of which were rebuilt after the rise of imperial Rome. Other archaic shrines to the northwest, such as the Umbilicus Urbis and the Vulcanal (Shrine of Vulcan), developed into the Republic's formal Comitium (assembly area). This is where the Senate—as well as Republican government itself—began. The Senate House, government offices, tribunals, temples, memorials and statues gradually cluttered the area. Over time the archaic Comitium was replaced by the larger adjacent Forum and the focus of judicial activity moved to the new Basilica Aemilia (179 BC). Some 130 years later, Julius Caesar built the Basilica Julia, along with the new Curia Julia, refocusing both the judicial offices and the Senate itself. This new Forum, in what proved to be its final form, then served as a revitalized city square where the people of Rome could gather for commercial, political, judicial and religious pursuits in ever greater numbers. Eventually much economic and judicial business would transfer away from the Forum Romanum to the larger and more extravagant structures (Trajan's Forum and the Basilica Ulpia) to the north. The reign of Constantine the Great saw the construction of the last major expansion of the Forum complex—the Basilica of Maxentius (312 AD). This returned the political center to the Forum until the fall of the Western Roman Empire almost two centuries later.
























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Old July 8th, 2016, 04:19 AM   #7
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On Glorious HD:


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Old July 8th, 2016, 08:08 PM   #8
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The Roman Empire in my homecity Trier (Augusta Treverorum), Germany:

Porta Nigra:

Porta Nigra - Trier, Germany by fisherbray, on Flickr

DSCN1348 Trier Porta Nigra by Lothar Thiel, on Flickr

Once one of the four city gates of Trier. It was first restored under Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 19th century and is today the best preserved and biggest Roman city gate north of the Alps. It's a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Constantine Basilica:

Konstantinsbasilika Trier by werner1943, on Flickr

Fisheye - Basilika in Trier by zAppi666, on Flickr

This was the throne room of Emperor Constantine the Great. Today it is the largest surviving single room of antiquity. It's a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Emperor's Baths:



Kaiserthermen (IMG_2567) by Van der Hoorn, on Flickr

Built for Emperor Constantine and his court but never completely finished. Still it is today the largest surviving Roman Baths north of the Alps. It's a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Roman Bridge:

Römer Brücke by Oliver Mohrbeck, on Flickr

Germany's oldest Bridge, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Igel Column:



A burial monument for a rich Roman merchant. With a height of about 30 metres is one of the larest burial monuments of Roman antiquity and the only Roman burial monument still standing on it's original place north of the Alps and it also is a UNESCO world heritage site.
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Old July 20th, 2016, 06:52 AM   #9
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Very surprised about that bridge. Thanks for posting it.
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Old July 20th, 2016, 06:53 AM   #10
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Old July 20th, 2016, 06:54 AM   #11
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And some of the most important engineering wonders of Rome from the Hop--On-Hop-Off Bus:



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Old July 20th, 2016, 07:05 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EMArg View Post


Very surprised about that bridge. Thanks for posting it.
What's so surprising about it?

I hope a couple of other people will post some more cities (their home cities) that the Roman Empire left it's mark on.
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Old July 20th, 2016, 07:41 AM   #13
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I'm not used to see them, that's all I have the image in my mind of bridges made on the 18th, 19th and 20th Century when it comes to european cities. The fact that they survived so much time when they were vastly used for centuries is quite shocking aswell. The roman engineering gets very interesting when looking at those details.
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Old July 21st, 2016, 01:35 AM   #14
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Vienne (Colonia Julia Viennensis) (my home city), south-eastern France :


Remains of the Forum :

- Roman Temple of Augustus and Livia (20-10 BC) :


- Remains of the portico in the forum (1st century AD) :


Former roman municipal hall (called now Archaeological Garden of Cybele) :


The Roman Theatre (1st century AD) had space for an audience of 13,000 persons (now 8,000) :


Remains of the Odeon (1st century AD), this covered theatre had a capacity of 3,000 persons :


The Pyramid (2nd century AD), is the only vestige of the Roman Circus (who had a capacity of 15,000 and 20,000 persons) and was located in the middle of the spina :


Roman way in the city center :


Archeological site of Saint-Romain-en-Gal with the museum (situated on the right bank of the Rhône, this place was a vast residential and commercial area of Vienne) :


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Old August 20th, 2016, 08:34 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EMArg View Post
I'm not used to see them, that's all I have the image in my mind of bridges made on the 18th, 19th and 20th Century when it comes to european cities. The fact that they survived so much time when they were vastly used for centuries is quite shocking aswell. The roman engineering gets very interesting when looking at those details.
That bridge was almost blown up by the retreating Nazi's during WW2. They drilled holes for the explosives but luckily they didn't blow it up.
Also the Roman portion of the bridge is just the piers/columns. During the Roman period the bridge had wooden decks.
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Old April 23rd, 2017, 06:52 PM   #16
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Area Sacra dell Argentina Rome 3D

anaglyph red/cyan glasses please to see depth.

Area Sacra dell Argentina Rome 3D

Colosseum Rome 3D
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