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Old June 9th, 2005, 05:54 AM   #41
Haber
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy2
I understand the system in Leeds is very much like the OBahn in Adelaide.
Those areas do not, however get -30 and tons of snow. I haave a felling it would be very difficult to clear those kind of bus rails. I don't see how a regular snow clearing machine could do it.
There are many ways I have found to deal with snow clearance. One issue is loss of traction and in Essen, Germany they found that heating was only needed on inclines. Winnipeg is very flat so in most cases that is not a problem.

In terms of snow clearance and drainage, there are many ways to deal with that. In Adelaide, the guideways are built on piles so in that case snow and rain would just fall through. For guideway sections on the ground, the part between the tracks can be used for drainage and snow storage. Plows and snowblowers would be used as well as salt and sand dispensing vehicles. To prevent drifts, fences would be on either side of the guideway.

In any case, even if Winnipeg were to adopt just a conventional busway testing on what would be the best methods for this would have to be done. Also bus-rail is a lot safer in winter since these buses can brake in a much shorter distance than on a conventional roadway.
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Old August 30th, 2005, 08:34 PM   #42
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Check out the Website

You can now check out my website explaining pretty much everything about the plan.

www.winnipegrapidtransit.ca
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Old October 31st, 2011, 06:37 AM   #43
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Between this idea and Rapid Transit to LRT? dunno what to think, but as we see this idea should come up again. l like the pick of The Union Station concept and the other idea about a setup at the ballpark. Nice.

l know this thread is old, but what's old is new again.
l will try to put the new thread l created and put what ever l said in it here, but the mods or admin teams should change the title for this one to what l named the new thread. It would help wonders.
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Old October 31st, 2011, 06:44 AM   #44
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I can merge these two threads if thats what you want.
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Old October 31st, 2011, 06:47 AM   #45
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After spending $1.25 million on transportation planning over the past three years, the City of Winnipeg is finally ready to lift the lid on its blueprint for new regional roadways, rapid-transit lines and commuter cycling routes.

On Friday, the city will unveil the final draft of the Transportation Master Plan, a document intended to lay the groundwork for the expansion of the city's existing network of roads, bus routes and bike and pedestrian paths.

Transportation master plan
What is it? A $1.15-million blueprint for developing new roads, active-transportation routes and transit lines within the City of Winnipeg. It should also firm up the city's plans for dedicated bus corridors and light-rail transit.

When will councillors see it? Executive policy committee has reviewed several drafts at informal meetings. The rest of council will get to see the final version Friday morning.

When will the rest of us see it? The plan will be made public as early as Friday afternoon. After that, the city will hold an open house about the plan, likely at The Forks.

Then what happens? The plan will come before a special meeting of council's public works committee in early November and then move over to EPC on Nov. 9. Barring any issues, council will debate the plan on Nov. 16.

-- Kives
It may also settle the question of whether dedicated bus corridors or light-rail tracks will dominate the expansion of Winnipeg's fledgling rapid-transit network, which so far consists solely of the 3.6-kilometre, as-yet-unopened first phase of the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor.

City councillors will be briefed on the transportation plan at a closed-door Friday-morning seminar, after which the draft is expected to be made public.

"It's a combination of new road infrastructure, rapid transit and you'll probably see more active transportation than ever before," said St. Boniface Coun. Dan Vandal, who chairs council's public works committee.

Members of council's executive policy committee have perused early drafts of the plan at least twice this year alone. Most city departments have also had a chance to view the plan and offer input, sources confirmed.

Some councillors who do not sit on EPC, however, complain they have been frozen out of the transportation-planning process.

"I've been attempting to have input into it but have been refused," said Transcona Coun. Russ Wyatt. Over the past six months, Couns. John Orlikow (River Heights) and Jenny Gerbasi (Fort Rouge) also complained about being left in the dark.

"We were told there was no time, money or resources to meet with elected officials," Wyatt said.

The city has held some public consultations about the transportation blueprint, however. At an open house in July, an interim plan called for five rapid-transit corridors in Winnipeg: a completed southwest corridor, three new lines along sections of Nairn Avenue, Main Street and Portage Avenue and a spur line from Polo Park to Richardson International Airport.

The interim plan also called for the potential realignment of the second phase of the southwest corridor. This realignment would take commuters travelling between downtown and the University of Manitoba on an L-shaped detour around Fort Garry's Parker, Beaumont and Maybank neighbourhoods west of Pembina Highway.

The idea of moving the southwest corridor away from Pembina Highway first emerged in 2009, when council approved a land swap with developer Andrew Marquess, who wants to build townhouses on unserviced, partly wooded land in the Parker neighbourhood.

That plan, devised by then-property director Phil Sheegl -- now Winnipeg's chief administrator -- proposed an eastern extension of the Sterling Lyon Parkway as well as a rapid-transit corridor running along Parker Avenue.

On Wednesday, Winnipeg Mayor Sam Katz declined to comment on specific aspects of the transportation plan, claiming it remained a work in progress.

"My understanding is they're still working on it. It's not finalized," Katz said.

The mayor also suggested the city will have difficulty building new roads, transit routes and active-transportation paths without more provincial funding. "You're talking to me about new stuff. Our old stuff is falling apart," he said.

After it's made public, the Transportation Master Plan is expected to come before two council committees before it proceeds to city council on Nov. 16.
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Old October 31st, 2011, 06:50 AM   #46
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Roads forward mapped out
$5-B master plan includes four rapid-transit lines, ring road


Iron workers guide in steel for the Osborne bus station part of the 3.4-km rapid transit busway.
The City of Winnipeg would like to spend approximately $5 billion over the next 20 years to complete four rapid-transit lines, build a ring road inside the Perimeter and make it easier to move goods in and out of the CentrePort trade hub.




City of Winnipeg Executive Summary October 28 2011
All that's missing is the source of cash for dozens of projects identified as priorities in the city's new Transportation Master Plan, a blueprint for the new roads, transit lines and bike-and-pedestrian projects planners believe Winnipeg will need over next two decades to accommodate the city's growth.

Related Items
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Slow transit Compiled over the past three years at a cost of $1.25 million, the transportation strategy is intended to co-ordinate the construction of new roads, paths and rapid-transit lines with new residential and commercial growth.

The city has done a poor job of transportation planning in the past, public works director Brad Sacher acknowledged Friday.

"Anyone who moves around in the city of Winnipeg knows of situations and areas of the city that demonstrate what can happen when that's not done well," Sacher said after city councillors had the chance to peruse the new plan.

The document calls for at least $2.1 billion in spending on regional road improvements over the next 20 years as well as up to $2.7 billion to complete four rapid-transit lines, beginning with the completion of Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor, either as a bus-way or as a light-rail corridor.

The plan does not state a preference for either bus corridors or light-rail lines to be constructed along rapid-transit routes planned to parallel Pembina Highway, Nairn Avenue, Portage Avenue and Main Street.

The city will likely wind up building both bus-ways and rail lines, said Mayor Sam Katz, who tempered his historic preference for light rail by noting the decision whether to use bus rapid transit or light-rail transit depends on the corridor in question.




Road network implementation plans (CITY OF WINNIPEG)
"I think we will probably see a combination," said Katz, adding he believes it's entirely realistic to complete all four lines by 2031.

"I don't think it's a pipe dream," the mayor said, pointing to the pending completion of the first phase of the southwest corridor, which employs a bridge and tunnel to bypass Confusion Corner.

"We've done one of the major parts of that. Going from downtown to Jubilee (Avenue) was a major initiative," said Katz, pledging to locate the funds to complete the southwest corridor. "This doesn't happen overnight. Things take time. This one's obviously taking time. We'll find the money, one way or another."

The transportation plan does not state a preference for the alignment of the southwest corridor's second phase, which will either run alongside Pembina Highway or take a western detour into Fort Garry. A pair of possible alignments are also presented for the eastern corridor, which would connect downtown with Transcona.

Future rapid-transit corridors along Portage Avenue and Main Street would take advantage of the width of both roadways, which were originally designed to allow the passage of ox carts.

"There is a significant amount of capacity we can take advantage of on Portage Avenue," Sacher said.

Here are the road and transit projects prioritized in a summary of the plan, which will come before two council committees in November before a council debate on Nov. 16:




Map of rapid-transit plans. See the full report for details. (CITY OF WINNIPEG)
Rapid transit
Total projected cost (2011 funds): $671 million to $2.7 billion

Completion before 2031:
Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor: The first phase of the corridor, from Queen Elizabeth Way to Jubilee Avenue, cost $138 million to build. This phase is slated to open in April 2012. Building the second phase, an extension to the University of Manitoba, will cost $275 million as a bus-way for a total cost of $413 million. Converting the entire line to light rail would cost $700 million, for a total cost of $838 million.

The plan suggests two possible alignments for the second phase: One parallel to Pembina Highway and the other taking an L-shaped detour into Fort Garry, where it would run along hydro rights-of-way through the Parker, Beaumont and Maybank neighbourhoods.

East Corridor: The city is considering two possible alignments for a corridor that would run from downtown to Lagimodiere Boulevard. One would run through Point Douglas and cross the Red River at what's now the Louise Bridge. Another would cross the Red River north of the Provencher Bridge and run along the northern edge of Old St. Boniface. The cost is pegged at $174 million as a bus-way or $405 million as light rail.

West Corridor: This $146-million bus-way or $340-million light-rail corridor would connect Portage and Main with Route 90, running on or above Portage Avenue. A spur line would run up to the Richardson International Airport.

North Corridor: A $76-million busway or $177-million light-rail line that would run from downtown to Burrows Avenue, running on or above Main Street.



Road improvements
Total projected cost (2011 funds): At least $2.1 billion

Completion by 2016:
Kenaston Boulevard/Route 90: $129 million required to widen the congested stretch between Ness Avenue and Taylor Avenue.

CentrePort Canada Way (and connecting roads): $212-million construction underway.

Chief Peguis Trail: $110-million eastern extension from Henderson Highway to Lagimodiere Boulevard underway.




The Pembina underpass will be rebuilt.
Pembina Highway underpass: $14.3 million set aside for reconstruction near Jubilee Avenue.

Traffic signals: $4.3 million set aside for upgrades.

Marion-Goulet connection: $70 million required to complete from Youville Street to Lagimodiere Boulevard.

Plessis Road: Ottawa has promised to help fund a $75-million widening and a grade separation at the CN main line.

Louise Bridge: Reconstruction of the existing bridge or construction of a new bridge will be designed by 2016. Actual construction cost pegged at $100 million in city budget documents.

Waverley West roads: $55-million extension of Kenaston Boulevard to the Perimeter Highway and connecting roads underway.

Disraeli Bridge & Overpass: $195-million reconstruction underway.



Completion by 2021:
Chief Peguis Trail: $110-million western extension, from Main to McPhillips Street.

Bishop Grandin Boulevard: $80-million eastern extension, from Lagimodiere Boulevard to the Trans-Canada Highway.

Edward Schreyer Parkway: $60-million new road connecting the Chief Peguis Trail to Regent Avenue.

Fermor Avenue: $40-million widening from Lagimodiere to Plessis.

William Clement Parkway: $60-million southern extension from Grant Avenue to Wilkes Avenue.

St. Mary's Road: $60-million widening from St. Anne's Road to Marion Street.




The Arlington Bridge is to be rebuilt.
Arlington Bridge: Reconstruction. Cost TBD.

Osborne Street underpass: At Confusion Corner. Cost TBD.

Waverley/Parker grade separation: CN main line crossing to allow a connection between Taylor Avenue and the Sterling Lyon Parkway, either at Waverley Street or through the Parker neighbourhood. Cost TBD.



Completion by 2031:
Chief Peguis Trail: $130-million western extension from McPhillips to Route 90.

Bishop Grandin Boulevard: $100-million connection from Kenaston to McGillivray Boulevard.

William Clement Parkway: $100-million phase from McGillivray to Wilkes.

Silver Avenue: $90-million western extension to Sturgeon Road.

Chief Peguis Trail: $110-million eastern extension from the Ed Schreyer Parkway to the Perimeter.

Highway 6: $150-million southeast extension past Perimeter to Inkster Boulevard, in the RM of Rosser.




Under a sudden. Winnipeg has money to do this? Nice to know.
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Old October 31st, 2011, 07:54 AM   #47
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Public Open House Nov. 2, 2011
The City of Winnipeg and consultant team invite you to attend the third and final open house for
the Transportation Master Plan (TMP). This plan sets out a long-term strategy to guide the planning,
development, renewal and maintenance of a multimodal transportation system in a manner that
is consistent with projected needs, and aligned with the City’s growth and the overall vision for a
sustainable Winnipeg and region.

Drop by to see how the City plans to:

■improve multi-modal transportation choices
■accommodate goods movement
■integrate transportation and land use
■support accessibility and universal design
■manage transportation infrastructure assets
Planning for Sustainable Transportation
The TMP addresses all modes of transportation in an integrated sustainable manner. Highlights from the TMP will be on display and the final Plan will be available soon.

Winnipeg Transportation Master Plan

Date: Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Time: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Where: Carol Shields Auditorium, Millennium Library, 251 Donald St., Winnipeg, MB

Format: Drop in anytime – no formal presentation.

Staff will be on hand to answer questions

This one should be interesting to checkout and see what's about.
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Old November 3rd, 2011, 12:51 AM   #48
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The Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor, now under construction, still needs funding for a second, six-kilometre phase that would run from Jubilee Avenue to Bison Drive.
Winnipeg's mayor and Manitoba's premier both say they're ready to roll on the next phase of the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor -- although they have yet to express this to each other, face to face.

Sam Katz and Greg Selinger both signalled Tuesday they are prepared to end their nearly two-year-old dispute over the completion of a rapid-transit line that would eventually connect downtown Winnipeg to the University of Manitoba.

The corridor's $138-million first phase, a 3.6-kilometre busway that runs between Queen Elizabeth Way and Jubilee Avenue and bypasses Confusion Corner, is slated to open in April. But there is no funding agreement in place to begin work on a six-kilometre extension of the route to Bison Drive.

In late 2009, the Selinger government and Ottawa each agreed to contribute $63 million toward the completion of this second leg, whose cost was pegged at $189 million at the time. But Katz turned down the offer due to higher cost projections, his desire to fund other infrastructure projects and a preference to upgrade the entire bus corridor to light rail.

Katz softened that position last week after the city unveiled a transportation master plan that calls for the completion for four rapid-transit lines by 2031, starting with the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor.

The mayor says he would support the completion of this route as a busway as a first step toward a future light-rail upgrade. But he would do this only if the province agrees to cover at least one-third of the projected $275-million cost and Ottawa also contributes.

"If the premier is genuinely prepared to come to the table with $92 million, in 2011 dollars, I'm prepared to go for it," Katz said Tuesday in an interview.

"You can talk all you want about doing it. Are they prepared to put up one-third?"

Katz said he still prefers to upgrade the entire route to light rail, which would cost the city $700 million. But he said he is prepared to fund the busway first if he has willing partners in the other two levels of government.

The recently re-elected Selinger suggested Manitoba's NDP government will come to the table, even though he did not state any specific funding target.

"The minute they're ready to do it, we're ready to work with them on it," said the premier, noting the construction of the new football stadium at the University of Manitoba as an impetus for the completion of the city's first rapid-transit corridor.

"We've always suggested that how we build the infrastructure should allow for conversion to light rail, if it's cost-effective. But let's get on with it and build it and make sure that it's available to people so we can move more people in south Winnipeg."

There's a window of opportunity for the city, province and Ottawa to complete the southwest corridor, said St. Boniface Coun. Dan Vandal, who's a member of both the NDP and council's executive policy committee.

By the third week of November, EPC is expected to table the 2012 capital budget and five-year capital forecast, a spending blueprint for future infrastructure projects. Transit proponents on council hope this plan will include the cost of planning the second phase of the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor, if not the completion itself.

"Our challenge is to try to craft a budget document that will start to pave the way for either the conclusion of this rapid-transit line or the start of another one," Vandal said. The city also plans to complete east, west and north corridors by 2031, along with the construction of an inner ring road and the completion of streets that will serve the CentrePort trade hub.

"Our challenge as politicians is to bring it down to the year-to-year reality of what we can afford and negotiate with other levels of government to do something positive, both on the road side and on the transit side," Vandal said.
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Old November 3rd, 2011, 05:42 PM   #49
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Routing the second leg of the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor through undeveloped sections of Fort Garry would be a risky move for Winnipeg, says a visiting U.S. transit expert.

Winnipeg's new Transportation Master Plan calls for two possible means of connecting the first phase of the southwest corridor, which ends at Jubilee Avenue near Pembina Highway, with Bison Drive near the University of Manitoba.

One option would see the future busway or light-rail line run down the west side of Pembina Highway in a relatively straight line. The other would take an L-shaped detour around the Parker, Beaumont and Maybank neighbourhoods, using vacant Parker land and Manitoba Hydro corridors.

Several senior city officials, including Mayor Sam Katz, favour the latter option because any development along the new line in low-density sections of Fort Garry would generate new property-tax revenue that could be used to recoup the cost of building the new route. There is less room for such development along Pembina Highway.

But the L-shaped detour constitutes a high-risk, high-reward option for the city, said Ron Fisher, a transit consultant who administered $1.6 billion worth of transit-corridor projects a year during his time with the U.S. Federal Transportation Administration.

"Without even looking at the line in question, I can tell you it's a risk. Whenever you run a line though an undeveloped area, it's going to be risky, but there is also the potential for rewards," Fisher said Wednesday at the Fort Garry Hotel, following an address at the University of Manitoba Transport Institute's sustainable public transit conference.

The success of a rapid-transit line typically depends on how well it meets the needs of transit users, not whether it stimulates economic development, Fisher said in his address, entitled Alternatives Analysis: Choosing a Rapid Transit Mode.

Proponents of rapid-transit lines tend to overestimate the benefits of proposed routes and underestimate the potential costs, he said. A common mistake is assuming a new rapid-transit line -- whether it's a busway or light-rail corridor -- will spur large increases in transit ridership.

Most of the people who wind up using rapid transit turn out to be existing transit users, said Fisher, citing studies of 18 U.S. rapid-transit lines.

The mode of transportation did not appear relevant, he added, in terms of increasing ridership or promoting economic development. The factors that dictated success included travel time, reliability and even branding, as the placement of dingy, old buses on brand-new busways can hamper efforts to promote ridership.

"You can't say rail promotes economic development, buses don't. You have to dig deeper," Fisher said in his address.

In recent years, Winnipeg's mayor has asserted light rail would offer more economic benefits to Winnipeg than bus rapid transit, citing research commissioned by the city. The actual conclusion of that research, however, supports Fisher's point.

In a 2009 cost-benefit analysis that compared bus rapid transit to light-rail transit, consulting firm HDR concluded both modes of transportation offer Winnipeg clear financial benefits. That said, the firm concluded BRT is a safer financial bet, while LRT offers more potential in terms of transit-oriented development.

More recently, the city's new Transportation Master Plan maintains building the second phase of the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor as a busway would cost $275 million, while upgrading the entire line -- including the first phase -- to light rail would cost $700 million.

The $138-million first phase of the corridor, which allows transit buses running between downtown and southwest Winnipeg to bypass Osborne Village and Confusion Corner traffic, will open on April 8.

Eighteen transit routes will use the 3.6-kilometre bus corridor, Winnipeg Transit announced Wednesday.


Should place bets on what Mayor Sam Katz will build. hehe

#1 Rapid Transit
#2 Bus Rapid Transit
#3 Light Rapid Transit
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Old November 8th, 2011, 09:15 PM   #50
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Kenaston extension

Drove by what looks like the start of the Kenaston extension south of Bishop. Anyone know is there going to be an overpass where Kenaston meets Bishop or another set of godforsaken lights?
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Old November 8th, 2011, 09:25 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by sublime1 View Post
Drove by what looks like the start of the Kenaston extension south of Bishop. Anyone know is there going to be an overpass where Kenaston meets Bishop or another set of godforsaken lights?

Plz put this under Winnipeg Transportation and Infrastructure
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Old November 16th, 2011, 06:59 PM   #52
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Rapid transit should extend to the U of M by 2016, says a city committee.

The deadline is one of the amendments the public works committee made to Winnipeg's Transportation Master Plan Tuesday morning.

The executive policy committee will hold a special meeting Wednesday morning to approve the plan before it heads to city council.

The deadline set out in the report is by 2031; councillor Jenny Gerbasi told the committee that isn't fast enough. The first phase of the Southwest Bus Rapid Transit Corridor is expected to be up and running in 2012.

Gerbasi's deadline was backed by public works chairman Coun. Dan Vandal (St. Boniface) and Coun. Devi Sharma (Old Kildonan).

The transportation master plan calls for the completion of four rapid corridors over the next 20 years: the Southwest Corridor (already under construction) running from Graham Mall downtown to the University of Manitoba, the West Corridor running from Portage and Main to Century, the East Corridor running from Graham Mall to Lagimodiere Boulevard, and the North Corridor running from Graham Mall to Burrows Avenue.

The plan also anticipates the completion of Southeast and Northeast “extension” corridors, post 2031.

Whether these corridors will take form in the shape of Light Rail Transit (LRT) or Bus Rapid Transit is a decision for another day, said Brad Sacher, director of public works.



Anyone care to get into the face of City Hall and tell them that. Our city is way behind? As you can tell. l am putting it in a nice way so ppl think l'm not yelling or losing my mind. hehe.....but seriously.

Last edited by Fozzy33; November 18th, 2011 at 06:21 AM.
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Old November 18th, 2011, 02:42 AM   #53
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Uh, LRT dammit!
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Old November 18th, 2011, 06:20 AM   #54
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Quote:
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Here is a rendering of the expansion of the system's hub station Union Station.


Right now Union Station has 4 sets of two tracks going through it. That means eight tracks all together. Right now the first two are occupied by the Winnipeg Railway Museum. The next four have Via Trains and the last two carry freight traffic. The platforms at the station are dark, ugly and narrow with poor access to them. In this plan a set of tracks would be removed and freight traffic would bypass the city. Two sets would be dedicated to Rapid Transit while the last one would still have Via service. Also the platforms will be covered by a glass roof. The trains that are part of the museum will be moved to a dedicated site in the new station complex. There will be on street retail and offices in the building.
With idea a person would think. that Via rail slash CP rail would work with Transit to get something done. So the price of LRT does not cost oh ummm $1.6 billion dollar.


Harber was onto something and l believe he is right with what posts he did make during his time here. l do wish he does return.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 04:46 PM   #55
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The city plans to spend more money on troubled bridges over Winnipeg waters.

Five years ago, about 18 per cent of Winnipeg's bridge structures were in poor condition and had problems with corrosion, crumbling concrete and deteriorating joints of rusted steel girders. The latest 2011 Winnipeg bridge condition data show that number has dropped to 10 per cent.

City engineers hope they can continue to make a dent in the number of bridges in rough shape as Winnipeg plans to spend $19.7 million to maintain bridges, overpasses and culvert crossings -- up from $14.9 million the year before.

Currently, seven of the city's major bridges are in poor shape, including Osborne Bridge and Disraeli Bridge.

Brad Neirinck, city bridge engineer, said four of the seven bridges in need of major repairs are currently undergoing, or slated for, rehabilitation in the next few years. He said that will leave only three bridges such as the Louise and Arlington bridges in need of pricey overhauls.

Unlike road repairs, where city crews can't keep up with the number of deteriorating streets, crews have been able to chip away at the number of bridges on the "poor" list, Neirinck said. However, a number of structures in good shape slipped into worse condition because they've reached the point -- somewhere between 25 and 30 years after their last big repair -- where they need more work done.

"Generally some of our good structures have downgraded to fair because they're ready to be rehabilitated again," he said.

The lifespan of a bridge is 75 years. City crews try to do preventative maintenance on structures in good shape to extend that life. Even so, capital budget forecasts show the city will need to spend more money in the coming years on major projects.

The St. James Bridge southbound is slated to be replaced at a cost of $54 million in 2017 to widen it to four lanes and accommodate active transportation. A preliminary forecast said that could drop to $35 million if it's possible to rehabilitate the bridge without doing a total replacement.

In 2014, Winnipeg will examine whether the Louise Bridge can be rehabilitated. Budget documents show it could cost $100 million if a four-lane replacement bridge is required.

The Arlington Street Bridge could be an even bigger challenge. The bridge cost the city an extra $250,000 last year to repair and it can handle only 20 per cent of the weight load of a newly constructed bridge.

Neirinck said the bridge is in the worst shape of all and doesn't meet current standards. Every year, the city closes it for a week to conduct repairs. The city plans to spend $1.5 million to study the bridge's viability in 2013, to see if it will have to be replaced, undergo major construction or be decommissioned.

"Once a bridge gets in poor condition you're going to be spending more money on it," he said


Both the Louise Bridge and Arlington Bridge shold be replaced. They are both out of date with only 2 lanes on them. Should l say more?
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 05:19 PM   #56
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Winnipeg city councillors are set to vote next month on whether long-term rapid transit plans that include an overpass over Main Street and passage through Union Station should affect the sale of some prominent downtown property.

The city’s downtown development committee was to vote Nov. 28 on whether to declare as surplus a parcel of city-owned land along Main Street near St. Mary Avenue, but they put off the vote until January. Declaring the land, which is now a surface parking just north of Earl’s on Main, as surplus would allow the city to sell it on the open market. A city report says a developer recently showed some interest in the land, but it does not identify the potential buyer nor the project under consideration.

However, Winnipeg Transit wrote in the same report that the land is “required” for the future extension of the southwest rapid transit corridor, which now terminates near the Norwood Bridge.

“The plan for the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor includes a northerly extension of the transitway from Queen Elizabeth Way and Stradbrook Avenue via an overpass of Queen Elizabeth Way and the Assiniboine River, through the VIA rail station on tracks 1 and 2, and along the high line embankment to a point opposite St. Mary Avenue,” the report states. “(The land in question) would then be used to allow transit vehicles operating on the corridor to rejoin the street system at Main Street and St. Mary Avenue.”

Transit suggests in the report that it would be fine with selling the land so long as it be allowed to review the development plans or have the city reserve a nearby right-of-way for the transit corridor.

The city’s real estate division did not recommend councillors accept Transit’s suggestion.

A city spokeswoman said the northern downtown extension discussed in the report is not in the works for anytime soon.

“This part of the project has not yet been funded and there is no scheduled implementation date. Consequently, no detailed design or detailed cost estimate has yet been undertaken,” she said, noting the line’s extension to the University of Manitoba is the priority.

Coun. Jenny Gerbasi, who represents the area, said councillors should take Transit’s suggestions into account.

“Even if we don’t think we’re going to build this for 20 or 30 years, we should be making decisions now that make it possible,” she said. “We’re thinking long-term with this.”
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Old December 10th, 2011, 12:32 AM   #57
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St. Vital Candidate Rapid Transit Responses
ST. VITAL CIVIC BY-ELECTION CANDIDATES SHOW STRONG SUPPORT FOR RAPID TRANSIT WINNIPEG, Manitoba (November 23, 2011) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: A survey of candidates for the November 26th St. Vital civic by-election shows strong support to expand rapid transit in Winnipeg beginning with completion of Phase Two of the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor. The survey, undertaken by the Winnipeg Rapid Transit Coalition (WRTC), asked candidates vying to replace former City Councillor Gord Steeves in the St. Vital ward about their views on rapid transit in Winnipeg. The survey was sent to all candidates vying to replace former City Councillor Gord Steeves in the St. Vital ward. It asked them about their views on rapid transit in Winnipeg. “We are pleased that the four candidates who responded to our questionnaire have all indicated their commitment to move forward with rapid transit in our city,” noted WRTC spokesperson Paul Hesse. “We encourage the residents of St. Vital to seriously consider the platforms of each of the candidates and to support a candidate who supports a modern and efficient rapid transit system for the City of Winnipeg.” The four candidates who responded to the WRTC questionnaire were Steven Hennessey, Hammad Khan, Brian Mayes, Carl Osato, and Harry Wolbert. Candidates who declined to respond to the Coalition’s questionnaire were Mike Ducharme, Marty Green, Greg Nordman, Terry Wachniak and Beverley Watson. The Winnipeg Rapid Transit Coalition is a grassroots organization focused on improving public transportation in Winnipeg. Founded December 2007, it partners with other organizations to advocate for development of an effective rapid transit system in Winnipeg. NOTE: For a full listing of the questions asked by the WRTC and responses from the candidates, please see the attachment. Contact information: For further information or interview, contact Paul Hesse (204) 951-1697. --30-- WRTC Rapid Transit Questionnaire: Candidate Reponses for the St. Vital Ward Civic By-Election Question #1: Do you support the completion of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Route to the University of Manitoba? Carl Osato: Yes I do support the Rapid Transit route to U of M. I very much am for finishing of this project to start showing the public how effective Rapid Transit can work and that we need to continue to keep the city focussed on progressing throughout the rest of the city. Hammad Khan: Yes I do. It is very important that rapid transit is completed to the U of M but I will also fight for St. Vital to be included in the next phase of rapid transit as well. An improved transit system will ease some of the traffic concerns we face in the ward. Brian Mayes: Yes I support the extension. I would prefer light rail to bus, but if the only way to get it done for now is a bus route then I would support that option. In my second leaflet I clearly indicate my support for this expansion. In its current form (stopping at Jubilee) the BRT is "the carousel that goes half-way round" to use a friend's term. Harry Wolbert: Yes, I support the completion of this project all the way to the University of Manitoba. Steven Hennessey: Yes, and it should have been completed by now. This also should have been a part of the new stadium proposal which needed to include accessible transit to and from the stadium. Question #2: Do you support the City of Winnipeg's Transportation Master Plan proposal to expand rapid transit corridors to other parts of the city? Carl Osato: Yes, this is key to our growth in the city. It is an amazing sell for our residents, tourism and new immigrants to the city. It improves efficiencies within the city and will hopefully start to ease the traffic congestions around the city, or at least hold them to what they are while we grow as a city. Hammad Khan: Certainly there are issues with parts of the TMP. I do however support expanding rapid transit to other parts of Winnipeg. If elected a major priority of my term is to ensure St. Vital is included in phase II of Winnipeg’s rapid transit plan. Brian Mayes: I support the Master Plan, though details of certain routes would need to be discussed with the affected communities. Steven Hennessey: I support the plan in principle but with no way of securing financing for the plan it does not seem attainable at this time. In order for us to continue with the Master Transportation Plan we require ongoing consultation with the communities involved. This will take considerable effort from all 3 levels of government and the citizens of Winnipeg to see this long term plan through. Harry Wolbert: Yes, I do. Question #3: How committed are you to improving public transportation in Winnipeg and the expansion of rapid transportation? Carl Osato: I am very committed to this. I have seen some great transportation in other cities, such as Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary. Very positive effect for tourism and showing that we are a city that is aware of its growth and can effectively plan for it. Having vision for the future is important and improving transportation and public ones at that should be a major priority of any city of our size. Hammad Khan: I am very committed to the improvement of Winnipeg’s public transit system. Public transit eases the burden we place on our crumbling streets and reduces the amount of traffic we will face. Building more heated bus shelters, clearing snow at bus stops, and increasing the accessibility of public transportation in our community are all issues I support. Brian Mayes: I am very committed to improving and expanding rapid transportation. I have already encouraged the option of a super express bus that would run downtown from the St. Vital Centre. When I worked as a lawyer in downtown Winnipeg I took the bus, and always appreciated getting the 58 express as opposed to the 16. Compared to the same bus trip I used to make to go downtown to U of W (thirty years ago), the express system is much better. However, we have not kept pace with other cities like Ottawa and Edmonton over the past thirty years in terms of light rail and dedicated bus routes. Winnipeg has grown to a point where these alternatives should be introduced, not talked about for another 30 years. Harry Wolbert: When I ran as a candidate for city council and again this fall as a candidate in the 2011 provincial election, I made improving public transportation (including rapid transit) a part of both my platforms. I have NOT wavered in my commitment to this issue. Our city needs a rapid transit system! Steven Hennessey: I want to see our current transit system revisited and revised. We need to invite the public to voice their concerns and suggest ways we can improve our transportation system. We should have more buses on the road so that we can reduce the amount of cars travelling in our corridors. In order to reduce congestion we need an active, accessible and available transit system for everyone. The expansion of the Bus Rapid Transit System (BRT) should coincide with other projects that will increase bike lanes and other needed road infrastructure projects. We can then better reduce the congestion in those areas. We can no longer piecemeal projects together. Question #4: What is your vision for public transportation in Winnipeg? Carl Osato: I see us moving forward in rapid transit in the city. Ideally a line to the airport to downtown should be the next phase. At the same time, new infrastructure along with current infrastructure need to be part of any plan as the public transit will need to be on these roads. I see a lot more park and rides within suburbs that connect us with the rapid transit lines. I see us looking at possible LRT in the future also for at least one line down Portage to the airport. I see it as a strong alternative to commuting with cars. I see a transit station downtown connecting all lines and connecting the main downtown buildings so people do not have to go outside for catching the bus/train. Our winters can cause havoc waiting for buses. I see a better feeder system to our main areas within the city. I see the main areas having heated waiting areas. I see the future of public transportation as an option just as good if not better that driving in the minds of the public. Hammad Khan: Whatever age, wherever you live, there ought to be a quick, efficient, cost-effective, environmentally friendly way of getting around. Enhancing rapid transit not only helps ease Winnipeg’s traffic concerns but also brings us up to date with other major cities in Canada in terms of transportation. If I am elected St. Vital City Councillor, I will ensure public transportation remains an important issue at the council level. Brian Mayes: My vision would be to try to implement the Master Plan, though this will obviously take some time. As the city sprawls we need to look at the options other cities have adopted and already implemented, like light rail and dedicated bus routes to reduce congestion and reduce greenhouse gases. Harry Wolbert: My vision for Winnipeg includes a safe, accessible and affordable public transportation system. And rapid transit is an integral part of such a transportation system. Steven Hennessey: Our public transportation system needs to be vibrant, viable and delivered with long term vision. This vision takes commitment and we need to focus on how we can see these plans through but we also must do this with our infrastructure costs in mind. We should encourage alternate forms of transportation and allow for continued growth of our BRT system. I would like to see our BRT System connected to all major corridors of the city and want a system that connects our downtown to everyone. We can increase ridership, reduce traffic congestion and help our downtown thrive again. Let’s make our transportation system the pride of our city and not a have to system.


State of Rapid Transit
On February 4, Mayor Sam Katz made his annual State of the City address. In his address he expressed his excitement about what the future holds for the City of Winnipeg. The Winnipeg Rapid Transit Coalition shares his excitement. However, three and a half months after a civic election in which rapid transit was an issue, we are disappointed that there was no mention of rapid transit in his address. Mayor Katz mentioned virtually every other major project planned or imagined for Winnipeg, but failed to mention the following significant items: 1) Phase I of rapid transit from The Forks to Jubilee Avenue will become operational around November of this year. After decades of delays, this completed project will show Winnipeggers the benefits associated with rapid transit, from efficient transportation, transit oriented development in places like the Fort Rouge rail yards, and the state-of-the art design of many of the rapid transit stations. 2) However, with the opening of the transitway to Jubilee Avenue, The Southwest Transit Corridor will be only half-way complete. The completion of the Corridor to the University of Manitoba would serve the rapidly growing commuter population in Southwest Winnipeg and the large student populations at the University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg. It would also serve the new stadium at the University of Manitoba, helping address the traffic and parking concerns that have been expressed by local residents. 3) Phase I of the Rapid Transit system, successful as it will be, is the first of many steps that must be taken towards building a comprehensive rapid transit system for the entire City of Winnipeg. Rapid Transit would provide more transportation options, saving time, reducing congestion and enhancing the quality of life. Even tourists will be pleased to find more convenient and efficient transportation options when they visit our city. 4) A well-designed rapid transit system would make Winnipeg into the world class city Katz envisions. Most major Canadian cities are actively expanding their transit networks, and Winnipeg could easily be among them – senior levels of government have already offered the City of Winnipeg the necessary funds. We encourage Mayor Katz to continue to dream big for Winnipeg. However, dreaming big for Winnipeg must include rapid transit. It's time to get Winnipeg moving.


Capital Budget Consultations
The City of Winnipeg is holding consultations for the Capital Budget for 2011. The extension of Rapid Transit is currently not on the agenda. We encourage everyone to attend one of the two consultations listed below and request this addition: December 6, 2010 Sturgeon Heights Community Centre 210 Rita Street 7-9 PM December 9, 2010 Winnipeg Convention Centre 6-8 PM

Rapid Transit in Winnipeg
A first corridor of rapid transit is being built in Winnipeg right now. It will run from Queen Elizabeth Way (by Main Street and the Norwood Bridge) to Jubilee and Pembina. We believe that Winnipeg should continue to expand its rapid transit system to the University of Manitoba and to other parts of Winnipeg. We are disappointed with efforts by the City of Winnipeg to divert rapid transit money to new road construction, instead of completing the first corridor to the University of Manitoba.

What is the current status of the project?
Construction has now begun. Work in 2009 included drainage and work between Confusion Corner and Main Street. Work in 2010 includes pouring the concrete for the corridor between Confusion Corner and Main Street, adding active transportation paths and completing the tunnel underneath the CN rail line just west of Osborne. The Fort Rouge yards development is being planned and the stations at Harkness and Osborne will take shape soon. Construction on the first corridor is to be completed in 2011.

sorry for posting this a couple weeks late.
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Old December 10th, 2011, 09:07 AM   #58
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still no LRT!
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 04:02 AM   #59
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Is he referring to Bus Rapid Transit?
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Old December 22nd, 2011, 10:24 AM   #60
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Sorry to say this, but call the number and get answers, because l have been scratching my head for awhile on this issue. All l know is l will be siitting down with Kevin Chief of the NDP or one of his staff members on issues. This one is on the list amoung other things.
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