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Old September 10th, 2016, 02:03 PM   #21
julesstoop
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Looks a little like something you'd imagine in Tolkien's world. If anything it's neo-romantic, not classicist at all.
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Old September 11th, 2016, 02:28 AM   #22
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Those Hungarian buildings are obviously Gaudi-inspired. (See also the new national football centre, I think it's the same architect).

Gaudi itself was, a century ago, exactly what this thread is about - a completely new and fresh take on old architectural languages and idioms. (Upon rereading, the OP makes the exact same point.)

Those buildings on the previous page are lovely but there's nothing new and original about them.
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Old September 11th, 2016, 10:37 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru.mircea View Post
Those Hungarian buildings are obviously Gaudi-inspired. (See also the new national football centre, I think it's the same architect).

Gaudi itself was, a century ago, exactly what this thread is about - a completely new and fresh take on old architectural languages and idioms. (Upon rereading, the OP makes the exact same point.)

Those buildings on the previous page are lovely but there's nothing new and original about them.
Alright, fine It is a style that I wouldn't mind seeing more of though!
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Old September 15th, 2016, 01:40 AM   #24
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IMO there are a few ways to go about this:

1) Clip on some traditional elements to a modernist building. This is what postmodernism does and it's divisive to this day. A contemporary example of this appears below:



2) Another is to incorporate a few of the most popular and well-loved contributions of modern architecture (streamlined/abstracted ornament, more windows, open floor plans, more sculptural volumes) and use them while following traditional laws of composition and proportion. Here are a few examples, many from Florida (the birthplace of New Urbanism - which has pioneered this approach). There's obviously a continuum between mainly traditional and mainly modernist interpretations of this approach.











Here's a few projects from outside Florida that capture this approach nicely:




image hosted on flickr









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Old September 15th, 2016, 04:47 AM   #25
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Here's a few from the new traditional architecture thread that seem to nicely harmonize modernism and tradition:











Remember also that even many people who don't normally like modern architecture will swoon over Prairie, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco buildings - which generally balance modernist principles and materials with a traditional aesthetic.
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Old September 16th, 2016, 01:40 AM   #26
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Great!

Here's another example of what I consider an amazing way to integrate modern and traditional architecture, while still using some ornaments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post
Former Ford factory/garage, London, UK

Before:


After:












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Old September 16th, 2016, 02:16 AM   #27
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New York city has a lot of them, but here's my favorite. The Fitzroy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostface79 View Post
It was pointed out that this building curiously didn't have its own thread.
Now let's get some updates on this beauty.











Even the interiors will be a retro/modern combo.
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Old September 16th, 2016, 05:30 AM   #28
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I think The Fitzroy would not fit with what we were proposing earlier. The Fitzroy is a great example of pure Art Deco, I mean, it could easily have been designed in the 1930s, not precisely a new style developed from those types of architecure. Still a great building though.
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Old September 29th, 2016, 10:05 PM   #29
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Here are some more examples:

Java Eiland, Amsterdam



Aqua, Miami Beach, FL



They both look like traditional cities until you see that every single building in them is modernist.
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Old October 6th, 2016, 09:48 AM   #30
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Seem to have it better than traditional classic
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Old October 6th, 2016, 09:51 AM   #31
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great architecture......
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Old October 8th, 2016, 05:48 AM   #32
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Here's a few more buildings I've found that incorporate some traditional and some modernist elements nicely:


Ismaili Jamatkhana, Plano, TX



Jacmel, Haiti

And this interior of a chapel in Japan:
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Old November 2nd, 2016, 06:00 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Notgnirracen View Post
Wow! That's a very interresting piece of architecture. Personally I prefer when there are more ornaments, but combining two styles in this way looks amazing.



I couldn't agree with you more, it is absolutely gorgeous, and not something you see everyday. It is however not a new style of classical architecture in my mind. While the lower part of the building certainly is innovative, it's just a matter of changing building materials and still immitates an established style of architecture. When I said new style of architecture I was thinking about something compareable to the differance between Rennaissance architecture and Baroque.

The buildings are awesome though, both of them
very very very good )
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Old November 4th, 2016, 02:08 PM   #34
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I don't think you understand what classical architecture means...made evident by the fact you call columns 'roman' to begin with...but anyway, interesting thread.
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Old November 13th, 2016, 05:50 AM   #35
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ECIPSA TOWER, ARGENTINA

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Old November 13th, 2016, 06:05 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Notgnirracen View Post
I'm very fond of classical architecture and find it far more harmonious and natural than the clean lines and boxes which we find everywhere today. So naturally I am glad to see new buildings in baroque, renaissance revival or whatever, but on the other hand I don't think looking backwards and copying old styles is the way forwards in the long run. So I thought I'd ask if anyone here knows of any attempts to innovate and create new architectural styles based on the classical ones, much like Art Nouveau in the beginning of the last century.
Like this thread! I love modern and classical architecture, its not that easy can make this harmonious and natural.
But here are many samples! Thank you for sharing!
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Old November 14th, 2016, 10:52 AM   #37
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Gnza100, I don't think a postmodern glassy addition on top of an authentic classical building belongs in this thread. It's neither newly built nor fully 'new classical'.
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Old November 17th, 2016, 03:04 AM   #38
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This is basically the national style of the Netherlands. Almelo:



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Old November 17th, 2016, 03:05 AM   #39
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The Japanese architect T. Fujimori also works in this aesthetic:




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Old November 17th, 2016, 09:17 PM   #40
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I think the original poster is asking for a new style , a new school or form of "continuation" of traditional/classic forms

What mostly is seen today though is a modernization or "minimalization" of existing classical styles and at times blending them


If you look at some of the older north african classical buildings like im egypt for example (mostly built by europeans theselves) , you can see the styling is egyptian/norrh african , yet the layout is classically european


Now that happened decades and even centuries ago , but it was "different" and "new" compared to that era in europe,
I think thats what we were to discuss

A new , "classical" branch of architecture. But its hard today because most of the time , it will merge into "modernization" of existing classicalism
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