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Old October 13th, 2016, 09:50 PM   #1
Ivan the Immigrant
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Ancient Roman Cities

Leptis Magna


https://www.temehu.com/Cities_sites/LeptisMagna.htm


http://www.ancientportsantiques.com/.../leptis-magna/

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Leptis Magna, also known as Lepcis Magna, Lebda, Lubdah, Lebdah or Labdah, is located about 120 km east of the capital Tripoli, and only 2 or 3 km east of al-Khoms (Khoms or Homs). Its Greek and Latin name Leptis has been linked to the Berber and Punic Libqi or Labqi, which Bates was probably the first to mention in association with the Berber Ribu or Libu, whence the name Libya itself.

Originally, the city was a Berber settlement, well before the arrival of the Phoenicians about 3000 years ago. According to Ibn A'bd al-H'akam (ninth century), the Berber tribe Hawarra, a name closely linked to Zwara, Zwagha and Zwawa by Ibn Khaldun, established themselves at Leptis Magna and to the south of the Syrtis Major. After the Romans' destruction of rival Carthage (a mixed city of mainly Berbers and Phoenician settlers), the three cities of Sabratha (Zawagha), Tripoli (Oea) and Leptis Magna (Lubda) were incorporated into the Berber Kingdom of Numidia, before they were finally engulfed by the Roman invaders, where Leptis Magna became part of the Roman empire in 111BC.

Owing to the flooding caused by the rise of Lubda Wadi (see illustration above) the Romans built some engineering structures to protect the city from flooding. But as these barriers are no longer in place, the city of Leptis Magna suffered devastating flooding in 1987 and 1988. It took aid workers several years to restore the site, with the help of the UNESCO, which also proposed a flood protection project in 1990 to put an end to this ancient problem.

Under the influence of one of its citizens, the Berber Septimius Severus, who became the first African Roman Emperor, the extraordinary city of Leptis Magna became an important trading port, and enjoyed a monumental architectural development, like the beautiful Amphitheatre (dug into the ground of an old quarry), the colonnaded street, the Severn Forum, decorated with Gorgon heads, the massive Basilica, the Hippodrome, the Hadrian Baths, the Temples of Liber Pater, Hercules, Roma and Augustus, the Tiberio Arch, the Nimphaeum, the Oea Door, and the Palaestra. The existing Arch of Septimius Severus is a replica of the original arch, which has been moved to Tripoli. The splendid theater by the sea was also built during the Severus dynasty. Its excellent museum houses many important pieces of the city's history, like the mythological Gemini twin Castor and Pollux, some portrait busts found scattered across the ruins, the two Aphrodites from the baths, and the stone elephant. The city of Leptis Magna reached the height of its glory just before the first Vandal invasions in 5th century AD; after which it slowly began to disappear into the corridors of oblivion.

Source >> https://www.temehu.com/Cities_sites/LeptisMagna.htm

http://mishawalk1.livejournal.com/41783.html


http://photo.sf.co.ua/id189
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Old October 13th, 2016, 11:34 PM   #2
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Maps:
Roman Empire in 125. AD
Roman Empire in 395.AD



HI-RES

https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki...Empire_125.png

Last edited by Ivan the Immigrant; October 13th, 2016 at 11:47 PM.
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Old October 13th, 2016, 11:52 PM   #3
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Leptis Magna

http://photo.sf.co.ua/id189


http://photo.sf.co.ua/id189


http://photo.sf.co.ua/id189


http://photo.sf.co.ua/id189


http://photo.sf.co.ua/id189
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Old October 14th, 2016, 12:53 AM   #4
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Cool, was always intersted in urbanism and architecture of ancient Rome. Hope to see more of this
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Old October 14th, 2016, 01:32 AM   #5
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The Cities of Thessalonica in Greece, Alexandria in Egypt and Antioch in the East have an ancient and perhaps mystical sound to them, as do the Cities of Carthage and Marsilia in the West. But did you know that these were the Latin names of the five major cities of the Roman Empire?

The center of the Roman Empire was Rome, the Eternal City that was built east of the Tiber River. The layout of the streets and the The Last Day of Pompeii by Karl Brulov
building of sewers can be credited to the Etruscans. However, perhaps the famous Roman city and possibly the most notorious is Pompeii, which on August 24th, in 79 AD, was destroyed when Mount Vesuvius erupted.

Two of the largest and influential cities during the time of the Roman Empire were Zenobia, which controlled vital trade routes to Rome and Antioch.

Source >> http://www.brighthubeducation.com/hi...-major-cities/
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Old October 14th, 2016, 01:49 AM   #6
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Thessalonica: 316 BC – 51 AD

The short version:

During the many years of wars that took place after the death of the Great Alexander (in 323 BC), only one man was successfully able to rule (and eventually also to call himself King of) Alexander's homeland itself - Macedonia. The man's name was Cassander. After eliminating his rivals, becoming guardian of the toddler King (Alex IV), and securing the loyalty of the nobility under his rule, Cassander needed to strengthen his future hopes at claiming the throne. To do this, he married the only surviving member of the Royal Bloodline, a daughter of Philip the Great, and half-sister to Great Alexander. The woman's name was Thessalonike. They married in 316 BC.

In 317 BC, when Thessalonike and her stepmother (Cassander's last rivals) were beseiged for a year, the future King began making plans for his new country. Cassander sent his troops to strengthen old cities and to build new ones in strategic places. The most important new city, in the most strategic location, was just being finished when Cassander finally took Thessalonike as his captive, and then as his bride. Perhaps as a wedding present, he named the new city after her.

Cassander built Thessalonica on the site of an ancient Thracian settlement called Therme (which means ‘hot’). The site was especially valuable because of several choice features that had to do with its location, not the least of which was a large natural harbor, deep at the shoreline, where Cassander used to increase trade with the inland areas, and for basing a sizeable portion of his fleet. Using both Macedonian and Athenian architects, Cassander gave the old village gates, walls, a fortress, temples, a gym, stadium, theater, and all the special features necessary to be called a city in the world of their day.

The new city grew in importance and prospered, barring periods of conflict, for over a century. When the Romans finally occupied all of Greece (after their second invasion, in 168) they soon noticed the perfect location and harbor of Thessalonica, and made it the capital of their new province. By 140 a new Roman road, the Via Egnatia, was built running right past the city, connecting the traffic of land trade and armies between two major parts of the Mediterranean seas. The Romans kept peace, and the city grew in size and in (relative) prosperity. Italians, Jews and Macedonian-Egyptians all moved to the city, to share opportunities, and wealth (such as it was).

Source >> http://www.thessalonica.net/2005/01/...l-summary.html
Thessalonica

https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date...tern_face).jpg

Last edited by Ivan the Immigrant; October 14th, 2016 at 02:08 AM.
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Old October 14th, 2016, 11:45 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentyme View Post
Cool, was always intersted in urbanism and architecture of ancient Rome. Hope to see more of this
ditto...

@ IvtheIm, have you any good info on Timgad in Algeria? I remember seeing an awesome doco on that Roman colony/city.

Also you should look into Hadrian's urban interventions into Athens, very significant and well-preserved even today.
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Old October 14th, 2016, 01:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skymantle View Post
ditto...

@ IvtheIm, have you any good info on Timgad in Algeria? I remember seeing an awesome doco on that Roman colony/city.

Also you should look into Hadrian's urban interventions into Athens, very significant and well-preserved even today.


All you need about Timgad is here : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=835906

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Old October 14th, 2016, 03:36 PM   #9
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Were the walls of the houses made from wood places on a stone base? The remains look too uniform to have been fully made from stone.
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Old October 14th, 2016, 05:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnorian View Post

Were the walls of the houses made from wood places on a stone base? The remains look too uniform to have been fully made from stone.
We have an example here of how was the forum...







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Old October 15th, 2016, 06:25 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnorian View Post

Were the walls of the houses made from wood places on a stone base? The remains look too uniform to have been fully made from stone.
uniformity, order, a grid plan are distinct characteristics of classical cities going back to the Greeks.

https://www.boundless.com/art-histor...iod-344-10749/
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Old October 19th, 2016, 06:46 PM   #12
Sampei
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CATANIA, Italy

The roman city of CATINA or CATANA, on the previous greek Katane (today it's Catania), in Sicily, Italy.


Theatre:







Odeon:







Amphitheatre:















Terme achilleane:







Terme dell'Indirizzo:





Terme della Rotonda:












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Old October 19th, 2016, 08:08 PM   #13
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Interesting. Reminds me the theatre of Guelma (Calama), in Algeria.


Oksana Shepilova https://plus.google.com/116002791555510831720


Oksana Shepilova https://plus.google.com/116002791555510831720

( l’antique Calama ) theatre romain guelma wide angle photography by Chouaib Meraoumia, sur Flickr
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Old April 1st, 2017, 02:32 AM   #14
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Leptis Magna

Libya Leptis Magna 040 by Helge, on Flickr

Libya Leptis Magna 036 by Helge, on Flickr

Libya Leptis Magna 030 by Helge, on Flickr

Leptis Magna 20 by marc.pecquet, on Flickr
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Old April 1st, 2017, 04:57 AM   #15
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Cyrene (/saɪˈriːniː/; Ancient Greek: Κυρήνη Kyrēnē) was an ancient Greek and Roman city near present-day Shahhat, Libya. It was the oldest and most important of the five Greek cities in the region. It gave eastern Libya the classical name Cyrenaica that it has retained to modern times.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrene,_Libya
..

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Old May 10th, 2017, 10:38 AM   #16
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Sagunt / Sagunto. Spain

Teatro Romano Sagunto by excursionhortanord, en Flickr
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagunto_Roman_theatre
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Old May 10th, 2017, 01:45 PM   #17
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Reconstructed buildings in the former city of Carnuntum, Austria:

Lucius' House:











Villa Urbana:







The Roman Baths:













The Partially Reconstructed Domus Quarta:





Original floor mosaic:


Source: http://www.carnuntum.at/en
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Old June 23rd, 2017, 07:34 PM   #18
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So simple yet so beautiful, I could imagine living in that house today. Winters would be harsh and expensive but it really is beautiful.
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