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Old January 4th, 2010, 06:15 PM   #441
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Best laid plans ..
Remake of St. Clair serves as cautionary tale for Transit City

National Post
31 December 2009

Vintage streetcars rolled down the tracks and balloons were affixed at stops to mark the opening of a new section of the St. Clair Avenue right-of-way this month. After more than five years, the project was ready for riders from Yonge Street all the way to Lansdowne Avenue.

But as the celebrations took place, people in cars or TTC buses were stuck, pretty much as they are every day, in a traffic nightmare a little further west, at the intersection of St. Clair and Weston Road. It is part of the final stretch of the right-of-way that will extend to Gunns Loop, theoretically by next summer.

"It is a bottleneck," said city councillor Cesar Palacio, noting construction has made it virtually impossible to get to several big-box stores at Keele.

As Toronto begins construction on its massive Transit City light rail plan, the painful remake of St. Clair has become a cautionary tale for the rest of the city. Attempting to balance the interests of transit users, people in their cars, pedestrians, cyclists and local businesses is no easy task.

There are complaints about a lack of parking. St. Clair West cannot be considered bicycle-friendly, the space for cars is narrow, and often only one lane is open in each direction where there is on-street parking. A recent midday drive in regular traffic from Christie to Lansdowne took 10 minutes -- a good pace for a recreational jogger, but not someone in an automobile.

At Christie Street, the roadway is so narrow that to turn onto St. Clair, the drivers of the TTC's Christie Street bus have to either accelerate and make a hard turn at the last second, or slowly creep around the corner. Otherwise, there is the danger of getting stuck right on top of the right-of-way.

While everyone agrees the St. Clair right-of-way did not proceed as expected -- and cost the TTC $15-million more than the $65-million budgeted -- the larger question is whether lessons have been learned and mistakes will be avoided as Transit City is rolled out over the next decade.

The broader goals behind the St. Clair right-of-way are "the template" for future projects, said Councillor Joe Mihevc, the TTC vice-chairman whose ward includes the section of St. Clair from Spadina Road to Winona Drive.

While Mr. Mihevc has been the face of political support for the right-of-way, Mr. Palacio has been vocal in opposition.

"We hope this won't be repeated. This should not be a prototype," said Mr. Palacio, who supports subway expansion as the city's public transit solution. "This was nothing more than a whitewash," with the "illusion" of consultation with residents, he suggested.

He noted the St. Clair right-of-way is no longer touted as saving time for riders, and has resulted in narrow sidewalks in certain sections.

When the project began, it was supposed to result in a dedicated streetcar line, with no other major construction required and a completion date of early 2007.

About a year into the right-of-way, Toronto city council decided to bury the hydro wiring, which required extensive digging. By 2008, improvements to water mains were also approved by council.

While these decisions meant that the underground infrastructure was improved, it completely changed the scope of the initial plan, explained Scott Duggan, TTC project manager for the St. Clair right-of-way.

"This had nothing to do with the transit portion. But it added a number of years," said Mr. Duggan, who agreed it should have been identified earlier as an issue.

According to Mr. Mihevc, local businesses wanted hydro lines underground, and the water main improvements were a result of new rules imposed by the province as a result of the Walkerton Inquiry.

Still, he agreed that what he called "pre-construction issues," must be handled more efficiently for Transit City projects. Along with better pre-construction co-ordination, there will be an increased focus on communication with residents and an emphasis on minimizing disruption, explained Mr. Mihevc.

For example, on the stretch of the Eglinton-Crosstown LRT from Laird Drive in the east to Keele Street in the west that will be underground, there will first be about three months of surface construction on each section, he said. The road will be covered with timbers, while work continues underground for a year, with minimal disruption during this period to local residents and businesses.

Finally, there will be a further three months of above-ground work at the end of each part of the LRT project.

There will also be programs including advertising campaigns with financial help from the city to support local businesses during construction, similar to what took place on St. Clair, Mr. Mihevc said.

During Transit City construction, it is essential that business owners maintain pressure on city council and the TTC to ensure promises are kept and businesses are assisted, said Frank Reilly, former president of the Wychwood Heights BIA.

"I am happy it is done, yet it was brutal to live through," said Mr. Reilly, who owns Maple Paints, a family-run business that has been on St. Clair for 25 years. "The calibre of businesses here now is a lot better than they were," he said.

Even though construction in his area is not scheduled to begin until 2013, the head of the York-Eglinton BIA is already concerned about a lack of planning and communication by the TTC. "It can't just be about laying track," said Nick Alampi, who owns Andrews Formals. "The city has to start looking now to tear down buildings to turn them into temporary parking facilities," Mr. Alampi said. He warned of even more traffic problems at the Allen Expressway and Eglinton as a result of the LRT construction.

"Dufferin will become a major artery," he said. (The TTC did not respond to several requests for comment about the Eglinton LRT project.)

Along with managing construction disruption, Transit City officials may have to avoid the perception that some neighbourhoods are more equal than others. Mr. Palacio believes that the west end of St. Clair was not treated the same as more upscale areas such as Wychwood.

For example, a Green P parking lot opened recently just a block from the constituency office of Mr. Mihevc. "I worked with the Toronto Parking Authority to identify sites," said Mr. Mihevc, who dismissed suggestions of unfair treatment. "Talk to any neutral observer. He mismanaged the parking in his area," Mr. Mihevc said.

The councillor stressed the TTC projects will eventually help improve traffic flow for drivers. "This is about mobility. We want to make the TTC more efficient," said Mr. Mihevc, who noted that any increase in streetcar riders will leave more room on St. Clair for cars. "You have to let this settle down a bit," he said.
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Old January 4th, 2010, 06:53 PM   #442
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Huge Toronto's streetcar track map. The Best.
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Old January 27th, 2010, 05:45 PM   #443
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TTC texting system running late
TTC trip planner ready Transit trip planning gets easier, but only from home

23 January 2010
The Toronto Star

The TTC will unveil its long-awaited online trip planner next week.

But a text messaging system that lets riders use their cellphones to learn when the next bus or streetcar is due won't be available until at least the end of the year.

Last year, TTC officials said the texting system would be up and running by the end of 2009. But it requires an upgrade to the GPS system installed on buses a couple of years ago, said TTC spokesman Brad Ross.

Streetcars are equipped with GPS that works with the next-vehicle-arrival system. Next-vehicle-arrival displays have been installed in some streetcar stations and on subways.

"We have more than 10,000 bus and streetcar stops," Ross said. "Each needs to have a unique identifier number so you can send a text message."

Mississauga and York Region have similar systems, whereby riders can phone in a code for their bus stop and learn when the next bus is due.

But they don't compare in size and scope to the TTC system, Ross said.

"We carry 1.5 million people every day ... we need to compare apples to apples," he said.

Ross would not give details about the electronic trip planner, which will allow riders to type in their destination and receive detailed instructions for getting there by bus, subway and streetcar.
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Old February 13th, 2010, 05:31 AM   #444
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Rusty old streetcar poles overdue for retirement
Toronto Star
11 February 2010

If the TTC decides to clean house, it could start with a dozen old poles on Lake Shore Blvd. that should have been retired long ago.

After two days of focusing on problems the TTC made for itself by issuing temporary tickets to deal with a shortage of tokens, it's time to open a new can of transit worms, of which there is no shortage.

TTC streetcars are powered by electricity, which flows into them through a rod that connects to an overhead wiring grid, held in place by utility poles. The poles and wiring add to streetscape clutter along streetcar routes, but there's no getting rid of them, at least for now.

Tom Cutajar emailed to say the TTC replaced the overhead grid and the poles that hold it in place on a western stretch of Lake Shore, near Kipling Ave., a few years ago, "but for some reason, not all of the old poles were removed.

"Lake Shore and Kipling is a real mess. A lot of the old poles are very rusted and some are leaning, an accident waiting to happen."

We checked it out and counted 12 poles that appear to have been used solely to hold up the overhead wiring, on the south side of Lake Shore, between Kipling and 23rd St., standing right next to their newer replacements.

The old poles are metal and were painted silver, but the paint is peeling, exposing large rusty patches. Some are leaning at precarious angles, but didn't appear to us to be a safety concern.

STATUS: Most utility poles are the responsibility of Toronto Hydro, but these appear to have been used only for streetcar wiring. Tanya Bruckmueller, who deals with media for hydro, confirmed that it's up to the TTC to get rid of them. Danny Nicholson, a spokesperson for the TTC, said he had to talk to a guy named Lou about taking the poles down, and would get back to us with a time frame.

What's broken in your neighbourhood? Wherever you are in Greater Toronto, we want to know.
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Old February 28th, 2010, 05:54 AM   #445
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Companies vie for $1.2B TTC streetcar contract
Published On Sat Feb 27 2010

[IMG]http://i47.************/fjnebk.jpg[/IMG]
One of the Flexity Outlook streetcars being built by Bombardier for the Toronto Transit Commission.

David Rider Urban Affairs Bureau Chief

A Vaughan company and a Montreal competitor are in a “war” to grab a lucrative piece of the TTC’s $1.2 billion contract with Bombardier to replace 204 streetcars.

The results, to be decided in the next month, will determine how many of the hundreds of direct GTA jobs forecast by Bombardier will materialize and where they will be located.

“It is important that we have a partner in the Greater Toronto Area,” said Wernfried Kühnel, sales manager for VEM’s traction motor division, in an interview from Dresden. “We choose two or three partners and in the coming weeks we will choose who we will work with.”

Germany-based VEM, which won a subcontract from Bombardier to design the traction motor for the Euro-styled Flexity Outlook cars, is looking for a Canadian partner to assemble the motors.

VEM is talking to companies including Sherwood Electromotion of Vaughan and IEC Holden of Montreal about assembling all or part of the motors, Kühnel said.

“This is not a friendly competition — it’s a war,” Kühnel said with a laugh.

Bombardier suggested to VEM that it find a Canadian partner for the motor assembly to help it meet the TTC’s requirement that 25 per cent of the value of the massive contract be spent on Canadian parts and labour, he said.

Bombardier has also said it wants to make sure jobs are created in the GTA, he added.

Richard Williams, a project manager at Bombardier Transportation, said three companies — Sherwood, which is primarily a motor repairer and refurbisher, IEC Holden, a motor manufacturer, and Toronto-based Ainsworth Inc., a supplier of electrical, communications, mechanical and control systems — have all been “very entrepreneurial” in trying to win a piece of the streetcar prize.

“All were very aggressive in trying to get into Bombardier because this is a huge contract; it’s (believed to be) the biggest tram contract in the history of the world, 204 (cars and) there might be more coming,” he said, adding the car produced “could be used as a platform for the North American market.”

There is no requirement in the contract for GTA jobs but “naturally if we can re-invest the monies into the Toronto area, naturally that’s greatly appreciated by the customer and by everybody,” he said.

Last June, after Toronto city council passed a motion to ratify the deal which will see the “light rail vehicles” built in Thunder Bay, Mayor David Miller told reporters: “This is probably my proudest moment as mayor of Toronto.

“We have just secured the transit future of this city for a generation. And not only that, they will create thousands of jobs in Thunder Bay and around the 905 for parts suppliers.”

A study commissioned by Montreal-based Bombardier, which beat out German-based Siemens for the contract, said the deal would directly generate 5,700 jobs, including 5,000 in Ontario, 350 of them in the GTA. The Toronto area would also benefit from another 4,100 jobs created through spin-offs, it said.

VEM will decide over the next month, after visits to Dresden from Sherwood and IEC Holden officials, which Canadian company or companies will get subcontracts and whether it will be for a full or partial motor assembly, Kühnel told the Star.

“We visited Sherwood last December,” he said. “We visited different Canadian partners and Sherwood is one of our favourites. They have good experience,” he said, adding the fact that most of Sherwood’s experience is in motor repair, rather than manufacture, wouldn’t be a problem because VEM staff would provide any needed training.

On its website, Sherwood describes itself as a “leading independent provider of assembly and remanufacturing services for rotating electrical apparatus for rail, mass transit and industrial applications,” with one plant in Woodbridge and another in Buffalo, N.Y.

In a recent interview, Sherwood chief executive George Gavrilidis told the Star his company — the only traction motor firm in the GTA — has manufactured streetcar motor components for the TTC for more than 30 years.

But, if VEM asks it to assemble the entire motor, Sherwood will do so and sub-contract the production of some parts, including castings, to other firms “through the GTA,” he said.

“The entire traction motor will be made right here,” Gavrilidis predicted.

But he said it was a “sensitive time” in contract negotiations and he didn’t want publicity until after he and other Sherwood officials go to Dresden, hopefully to sign a contract, around March 21.

John Overton, IEC Holden’s project manager on the TTC streetcar file, declined comment on the ongoing negotiations.

The City of Toronto is paying $834 million of the streetcar tab, with the Ontario government picking up the other $417 million. Miller failed to get Ottawa to pay one-third of the cost with money from the federal infrastructure program.

Whatever contracts flow from VEM could reap greater benefits. The TTC’s contract from Bombardier contains an option that would allow the provincial Metrolinx agency to buy another 200 cars for the regional Transit City light rapid transit lines at a preferred price.

If that option is exercised, industry experts say, it’s very likely that companies with subcontracts for the TTC streetcars will also get work on the Transit City cars.
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/tran...-contract?bn=1
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Old July 14th, 2010, 04:06 PM   #446
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http://news.nationalpost.com/2010/07...ing-off-rails/

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Comment: Streetcars running off rails

Special to the National Post July 14, 2010 – 8:00 am

Urban Scrawl

By Rob Graham

Toronto’s dysfunctional love affair with its streetcars is hurting the environment. Each day, scores of streetcars block the progress of thousands of vehicles that, as they idle, spew tonnes of toxic exhaust fumes into the atmosphere.

Streetcars bring with them other major problems as well.

Do you ever wonder why you don’t see them grinding through Manhattan and other major North American centres? They’re a disaster in mixed traffic, slow-moving and costly to operate.

Those deficiencies don’t stop the TTC from running streetcars even where they don’t belong.

Let’s examine the issue of speed, or lack thereof. Consider the rider who gets on the 501 streetcar at the corner of Queen Street East and Kingston Road, en route to Queen Street West and University Avenue, a distance of 6.2 kilometres.

On a good traffic day the trip takes 27 minutes, a speed of about 13.5 kilometres per hour. You can run faster. In fact, the 501 streetcar would have finished 202nd if it had been entered in a well-known Toronto half-marathon last year.

Rapid transit means moving a large number of riders rapidly in an economically and environmentally efficient manner. Clearly, this doesn’t qualify.

Unlike a bus, a streetcar can’t pull over to the curb for riders to get on and off. When a streetcar stops it blocks a lane, sometimes two lanes.

This, of course, continually interrupts the flow of traffic. As vehicles get stuck behind the streetcar, their engines idle, wafting emissions into the air and enlarging Toronto’s carbon footprint.

Known affectionately as Canadian light rail vehicles (or, the really long ones, as articulated light rail vehicles), streetcars nevertheless have a place in the TTC’s fleet.

A single streetcar is capable of replacing the passenger capacity of up to 65 cars during rush hour — a bus, up to 45. Thus, streetcars make eminent sense in areas of high urban traffic and density.

(The 504 King car, for example, carried more than 56,000 riders per weekday in 2008.)

Problems arise, though, when these lumbering vehicles leave the density of the downtown core and begin to plod through residential neighbourhoods. Take, for example, the 506 Carlton streetcar. It begins at the High Park loop, and eventually chugs along Carlton Street, Parliament Street, Gerrard Street and Coxwell Avenue.

Buses would be much more efficient along the route. In fact, buses should be serving less urban intensified sections along all of the TTC’s routes. They’d be faster, cheaper — and less environmentally harmful.

A streetcar has a considerably higher operating cost per hour than a bus. This becomes an especially important consideration at night, when there are far fewer riders. Even so, the TTC remains heavily invested in them, economically, politically and culturally.

And it’s about to increase its investment. Over the next 10 years, it will spend more than $293-million to replace streetcar track — mostly on roads with other traffic — tearing up the road bed and replacing rail, snarling traffic and disrupting surrounding neighbourhoods.

There’s no question that streetcars work most efficiently on dedicated right-of-ways. Unfortunately, the recently completed right-of-way along St. Clair Avenue West serves as a glaring example of TTC mismanagement. Originally budgeted at $48-million, it came in at more than $110-million.

The TTC plans on modernizing its streetcar fleet with light rail vehicles at a cost of $1.1-billion. It will spend another $345-million on a new car barn.

In order to separate LRVs from other traffic, the new streetcar lines of Transit City will run on rights-of-way. Riders, drivers, and the environment will thank us.

National Post

• Rob Graham is a Toronto-based transportation and infrastructure analyst.

Read more: http://news.nationalpost.com/2010/07...#ixzz0tf4xaleQ
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Old July 14th, 2010, 10:39 PM   #447
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Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
What a total idiot. Buses are more efficient than streetcars and better for the environment. Seriously?

The speed of streetcars is restricted by traffic and number of people boarding. Buses will be no faster.

So what if cars have to stop - boo hoo. Give the streetcars their own right-of-way and stop cars driving along the tracks - problem solved.

The reason New York and other cities don't have streetcars is they abolished them in the days when cars ruled the world. Many cities are bringing them back - look at Europe and in North Amercia Portland and many other cities with light rail on the streets.

I never read the National Post - is always full of right-wing rhetoric - so this "special" is no surprise.
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Old July 14th, 2010, 11:17 PM   #448
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This guy is a perfect example of a overpaid, clueless consultant. No wonder he found a voice in a Conservative Canadian paper in bankruptcy protection!

This op-ed is so full of errors, and mis-truth, it would be a perfect candidate for spot on Fox News. It's truly pathetic this guy has the nerve to call himself a "transport analyst". This idiot is just riding the Rob Ford anti-intelligent populism affecting our city at the moment. It's disgusting, and of course the average National Post reader will follow his word lock-step.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 12:26 AM   #449
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I don't know. I tend to agree with a lot of the content of this, if not the tenor. Streetcars aren't the best solution in many situations. They do block traffic, they get bunched up on Queen, and for the life of me I can't understand how they keep running during snowstorms!

The fact that they're the only viable solution for Toronto transit is a seperate issue. I'd prefer subways and buses, but we can't afford subways, and busses spew too much smoke for us.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 12:57 AM   #450
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I don't know. I tend to agree with a lot of the content of this, if not the tenor. Streetcars aren't the best solution in many situations. They do block traffic, they get bunched up on Queen, and for the life of me I can't understand how they keep running during snowstorms!

The streetcars were around long before automobiles in Toronto. Streetcars helped develop the vibrant neighbourhoods that residents who trash streetcars take for granted. The author of this op-ed is clearly anti-transit, who tries to sound like he is for transit.

Quote:
The fact that they're the only viable solution for Toronto transit is a seperate issue. I'd prefer subways and buses, but we can't afford subways, and busses spew too much smoke for us.
Your transit knowledge is just as limited as the writer of the op-ed, if you think cities only need a low capacity system(buses), and a high capacity system(subways) with no intermediate capacity system(LRT, streetcars) needed. Geting rid of streetcars will only serve to decrease ridership, and degrade the quality of service on the route. 1 streetcar = 1.5 buses.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 01:17 AM   #451
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Your transit knowledge is just as limited as the writer of the op-ed, if you think cities only need a low capacity system(buses), and a high capacity system(subways) with no intermediate capacity system(LRT, streetcars) needed. Geting rid of streetcars will only serve to decrease ridership, and degrade the quality of service on the route. 1 streetcar = 1.5 buses.
I don't think that the only option is buses and subways, however championing streetcars on routes that are inappropriate isn't an effective proposition either. (Queen is a prime example, yes it's a beautiful ride, but who cares about the scenery when it takes an hour for it to come only to be followed by three or four empty ones in quick succession). Try telling someone waiting on Queen Street that 1 streetcar=1.5 buses!
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Old July 15th, 2010, 04:28 PM   #452
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I don't think that the only option is buses and subways, however championing streetcars on routes that are inappropriate isn't an effective proposition either. (Queen is a prime example, yes it's a beautiful ride, but who cares about the scenery when it takes an hour for it to come only to be followed by three or four empty ones in quick succession). Try telling someone waiting on Queen Street that 1 streetcar=1.5 buses!
Again, The Queen Streetcar had been around long before automobiles. The 501 actually used to carry around 90,000 passengers until the TTC imposed severe service cuts, and integrated the route with the 507 car, making the route much less reliable. The Queen line issues is not because of technology, but because of TTC management ineptitude, and refusal to admit merging the line with the 507 streetcar was a big mistake. Replacing the line with buses will not improve things, in fact it will only make traffic worse, as one ARLV(23m) is equal to 2 buses(12m), and as with all long routes, will still experience bunching, and the problem with bus bunching, is the leading bus is usually packed, while the trailing bus is empty. In-efficient use of transit capacity.
If you look at the statistics, the bus routes with the highest ridership require substantially more vehicles than streetcar routes. Just saying "Let's replace streetcars with buses" is not going to solve the issue. Quite frankly, streetcars(and buses) should be given priority over autos on congested roads. If that means taking away parking, so be it.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 06:10 PM   #453
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Originally Posted by sumisu View Post
I don't think that the only option is buses and subways, however championing streetcars on routes that are inappropriate isn't an effective proposition either. (Queen is a prime example, yes it's a beautiful ride, but who cares about the scenery when it takes an hour for it to come only to be followed by three or four empty ones in quick succession). Try telling someone waiting on Queen Street that 1 streetcar=1.5 buses!


bang your head with this fact.... busses bunch too.

bunching is not the result of the transit vehicles, but the traffic that it has to travel in.

If anything, busses would experience more bunching problems than streetcars as they have to park longer at stops to merge back into the moving lane, thus, allowing the next bus more time to catch up.


Queen St. need a subway though. Anybody got 10 billion dollars?
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Old July 15th, 2010, 06:36 PM   #454
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Anyway, Toronto's new streetcars will have more capacity, so there will probably be less dwell times at stops along a route.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 06:47 PM   #455
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The new streetcars will be all-door boarding and POP, the dwell time will certainly decrease.
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Old July 29th, 2010, 08:42 AM   #456
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Metrolinx orders tunneling machines $54 million purchase will be used to dig underground section of Eglinton LRT
Published On Wed Jul 28
Toronto Star


Giant tunnel-boring machines will build the underground section of the Eglinton Crosstown Transit City light rail line. METROLINX


Who says Toronto’s new light rail lines won’t be as good as a subway?

Metrolinx has ordered four giant tunnel-boring machines for $54 million to build the underground section of the Eglinton Crosstown Transit City light rail line.

“The LRT in the 11- to 12-kilometre tunnel is a subway in the sense that it is rail cars travelling underground with underground stations and no other traffic,” said Metrolinx head Rob Prichard. “The LRTs will be one, two or three cars in length. A subway is typically six cars. Therefore an LRT station underground has a shorter platform.”

About 12 kilometres of the $4.6 billion Eglinton LRT will run underground, from about Black Creek Dr. in the west to Laird Ave. in the east.

The beauty of the LRT, according to Prichard, is that at the end of the tunnel, riders can stay on the same vehicle and ride above ground all the way east to Kennedy station rather than transferring to a bus or streetcar.

The customized machines will be built by Lovat Inc. in Toronto, the same company that is supplying the TTC with four other tunnel-boring machines.

The TTC’s $58 million order for machines last year will be used to extend the subway into York Region.

The same machines could not be used for both projects because the tunnel on Eglinton will be about 6 metres wide, compared with the 5.4-metre tunnel on Spadina.

Light rail vehicles require pantographs (overhead structures) for their power supply, unlike the subway, which uses a third rail, said Prichard.

The ridership on Eglinton will be adequately served by light rail rather than subway, he said.

The first of the tunneling machines, which take about 18 months to build, will go into the ground around Black Creek.

On the east side, the LRT will continue above-ground all the way to Kennedy station. A second above-ground phase of the project on the west side, still unfunded, would see the line extended to the airport in the future.

Most of the tunneling will take place between 2012 and 2014, with the entire first phase of the line complete by 2020.

The tunnel-boring machine order is the latest proof of the Ontario government’s commitment to funding Toronto’s Transit City lines in the next 10 years, Prichard said.

David Miller has repeatedly insisted that the Transit City projects, which also include a makeover of the Scarborough RT and new LRT lines on Sheppard and Finch, might never be built since the government deferred about half of the $8 billion it committed to those projects in its spring budget.

The current Metrolinx plan calls for all four Transit City projects and a $1.5 billion express bus lane system in York Region to be completed over 10 years.
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Old July 30th, 2010, 05:32 AM   #457
ssiguy2
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THE POP is only on the TC lines and not the legacy lines or am I misinformed?
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Old July 31st, 2010, 02:13 AM   #458
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Why didn't they just get one 6 metre machine and use it on all four lines? Do these machines only last for a certain amount of useage?
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Old July 31st, 2010, 08:26 AM   #459
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Think it's a timing issue. 1 borer can only work on 1 tunnel at a time. So it'll take 6x as long to dig 6 tunnels, for example. Usually you need at least 2 to work on one line - 1 for each direction tunnel.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 09:52 AM   #460
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Just how is LRT better than buses? They have to follw traffic signals and doesn't carry a lot of people and is not that much faster than buses. I don't see any benefits of trams but then again I am a new yorker so never took trams that much.
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