daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > European Classic Architecture and Landscapes

European Classic Architecture and Landscapes All related to historical buildings and landscapes of the old world.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 11th, 2007, 12:02 AM   #141
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by C-Beam View Post
Your are twisting Kamplamm's words. Kampflamm said that Hitler liked classic architecture.
Its you who is twisting words.
Kampflamm mentioned "old" architecture.
Theres a difference.
And yes, Hitler despised old architecture (not everything though, just like he didnt despise all modern architecture), and most of all old city structures.


Quote:
something very differnt and with which you obviously mean naturally grown often medieval slightly chaotic networks of streets and buildings.
not just medieval structures to be correct.
He also thought of Berlin to be chaotic (and even lebesfeindlich) for example even though it did not have a medieval city centre like other cities.

Quote:
Yes, Hitler was against these chaotic and unplanned structures in many areas of of Berlin. He dreamed of creating wide and straight streets that were bordered by pseudo-classicist buildings in order to create a proper representation for the empire he wanted to rule over. He oriented itself at examples such as classic Rome and Paris.
He also wanted a "loosened up" city structure with much fewer density than Berlin had back then.
He despised the old architecture of Hamburg aswell btw.
Additionally he wanted to re-create the old decentralized living conditions of rural Germany because he thought that it suited the workers force best
This decentralization with additonal greenery to szuite the worker has been applied at the Mehringplatz 1 aswell btw.

Quote:
Note though that this is completely different from the architectural opinion that was dominant in post war Germany.
Not at all.
Hitler predicted quite well how Germany would look like after the war.
More decentralized, loosened up city structures, workers estates, car friendly, no medieval town centers which are in the way, etc..
Again look at the Bauräte of some big cities.
In many cases you will come across Ex-Nazis who worked together with Speer.
In one instance a Baurat in Düsseldorf has built a perfect Nazi building in the 60s for the city.



Quote:
These post war architects were completely against classic architecture and empire like pompous parade streets.
Parade streets couldnt be realized in the west due to the de-militarization.
In east Germany it looked different though.
Communist and Nazi architecture have a lot in common btw.
Especially in Germany and thats no surprise at all.


Quote:
They might also have liked open spaces but that is not enough to claim that their concepts were identical to the NAZI's. Just have a look at examples of Nazi architecture and post war architecture, they are very different.
I many cases Nazi city planning philosophy has been applied in post war Germany.
Ill get that article tomorrow and quote some statements for you.
Nazi architecture and city planning is not just about parade streets and big squares.
Theres much more to it.
And its known that the city planners in places like Hamburg or Hannover were Ex-Nazis that had worked directly with Speer.
Those cities dont look classical to me btw.
__________________

Highcliff liked this post
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old June 11th, 2007, 12:08 AM   #142
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by C-Beam View Post
There is tasteless Nazi architecture and good Nazi architecture.
Tastes differ.....

Quote:
Overall though I think Nazi architecture was more beautiful than post war architecture since they respected and oriented themselves at classic designs.
Nazi architecture was a weird mix of all kinds of architecture styles thrown together.
Funnily enough the same rule applies to communist architecture aswell btw.


Quote:
Something that the post war architects with their conviction of a "break with the past" sadly failed to do.
You should understand that our post war architecture was for the most part being formed by people who used to be either Nazis or people who worked happily together with the regime.
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 12:16 AM   #143
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by C-Beam View Post
And I suspect it have been old Nazis who wanted to tear down those buildings, right?
No idea.
However I do know which people and from which political spectrum tried to make sure that those buildings wouldnt be destroyed.


Quote:
Yes, yes....and about 300,000 Jews did also not flee from Germany.
Fine what happened to them?
After the war there were around 30.000 Jews who stayed here in Germany

Quote:
Not everybody has the will to leave his homeland just because circumstances are bad.
Thats the point!

Quote:
Rebuilding bomb damaged private buildings doesn't make him a Nazi nor a sympathizer.
Never claimed such a thing.

Quote:
The majority of Germans did not have trouble with the Nazis. If you keep silent and mind you own business you in general won't provocate authorities to target you.
Sure, but that was the problem that we had here.
That everyone minded his own business.
Thats the reason why millions of people died.

Quote:
That once again doesn't mean though that he was a symphatizer or supporter.
Again, I never claimed such a thing.
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 12:39 AM   #144
Kampflamm
Endorsed by the NRA
 
Kampflamm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Occupied Europe
Posts: 23,659

Quote:
Originally Posted by Checker View Post
Does this look like "old architecture" to you?
To me it looks like tasteless Nazi architecture btw.

Obviously when you're building something that's a kilometer long building, you don't pay too much attention to detail.

So what are we talking about now? Architecture or city planning? Hitler might have been fond of wide avenues but he certainly would have been no fan of German post-war architecture which put an emphasis on taking cues from "democratic" architectural styles such as the Bauhaus or other non-ornamental styles. Why do you think every building with a column or a pilaster was/is demonized? Because Hitler liked these sorts of things. You had the somber 20s and then the monumentalist 30s...which no doubt were somewhat influenced by more functionalists buildings. Nonetheless you saw a return to the "old way" of building things.

Quote:
Parade streets couldnt be realized in the west due to the de-militarization.
In east Germany it looked different though.
Communist and Nazi architecture have a lot in common btw.
Especially in Germany and thats no surprise at all.
So Communist and Nazi architecture had a lot in common (which I agree with...at least while Stalin was still around)...but you also claim that Nazi and post-war West German architecture had a lot in common. Strange...

I don't think we have these sorts of buildings in West Germany:















So we can agree about the fact that both East German commies and Nazis loved wide avenues, big buildings and lots of architectural features that are reminiscent of older styles (such as neo-classicism, renaissance etc.). However, I can't find these sorts of buildings anywhere in West Germany.
__________________
Free German passport

"I think it's a privilege to call yourself a Wunderbarler and it's something that you have to earn."

Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by Kampflamm; June 11th, 2007 at 12:51 AM.
Kampflamm no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 12:43 AM   #145
C-Beam
PriviledgedCisWhiteMale
 
C-Beam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Frankfurt
Posts: 2,877
Likes (Received): 3318

Quote:
Originally Posted by Checker View Post
Hitler predicted quite well how Germany would look like after the war.
More decentralized, loosened up city structures, workers estates, car friendly, no medieval town centers which are in the way, etc..
Decentralization, car friendliness, more space and wider streets is nothing bad. Your discription completely fails to describe what is wrong with post war architecture in contrast to Nazi or earlier architectur. The problem of post war architecture is its blandness due to the idea of functionalism and realism that dispised any decorative elements. That coupled with a general disrespect for great classic architecture that was never part of the Nazi doctrine.


Quote:
In one instance a Baurat in Düsseldorf has built a perfect Nazi building in the 60s for the city.
Sounds good if it is really decorative Nazi architecture and not some bland post war functionalist one.


Quote:
I many cases Nazi city planning philosophy has been applied in post war Germany.
Really? Show me all the neo-classicist buildings that have been build after the war.


Quote:
And its known that the city planners in places like Hamburg or Hannover were Ex-Nazis that had worked directly with Speer.
Those cities dont look classical to me btw.
If they were it is sad that they didn't continue with the former Nazi style.
C-Beam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 08:15 PM   #146
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Good news.
As I said Ive been to the library this morning.
Found the Spiegel issue I was looking for and copied the article.
Unfortunately Ill have to type the major facts in which takes time.
Ill do this either tonight or tomorrow.
Its a lot of work but some of the statements in this thread represent a falsification of historical events and I think that this is not allright.
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 08:29 PM   #147
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kampflamm View Post
Obviously when you're building something that's a kilometer long building, you don't pay too much attention to detail.
First of all no one who is obsessed with classical architecture will built a residential building thats over a kilometer long.
this is therefore a clear modernist building which is the point that I was trying to make.
As you may know , Nazi architecture borrowed a lot from architectural styles as represented by Le Corbusier.
Remember thats the guy that they were suposed to hate.....

Quote:
So what are we talking about now? Architecture or city planning?
Both to be honest


Quote:
Hitler might have been fond of wide avenues but he certainly would have been no fan of German post-war architecture which put an emphasis on taking cues from "democratic" architectural styles such as the Bauhaus or other non-ornamental styles.
this is were you are wrong.
Ill support my claim that the Nazis borrowed heavily from Bauhaus architecure and that the current city structures were heavily influenced by EX-Nazi city planners.

Quote:
Why do you think every building with a column or a pilaster was/is demonized? Because Hitler liked these sorts of things.
Have the peoples from the APH forum told you that

Quote:
but you also claim that Nazi and post-war West German architecture had a lot in common. Strange...

How could it be strange?
Look, for starters research soemone like Hillebrecht and its role in post war Germany.

Quote:
I don't think we have these sorts of buildings in West Germany:
Those are all typical commie buildings from the Karl-Marx Allee in Berlin (I recognized them instantly) which you therefore would have trouble to find in west Germany.......
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 08:35 PM   #148
Kampflamm
Endorsed by the NRA
 
Kampflamm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Occupied Europe
Posts: 23,659

Quote:
Those are all typical commie buildings from the Karl-Marx Allee in Berlin (I recognized them instantly) which you therefore would have trouble to find in west Germany.......
Your argument was though that Nazi and East German architecture had a lot in common...and that the same argument applied to West German and Nazi architecture. So why do we then see these ornaments in East Germany while West German buildings were deprived of theirs?

Quote:
As you may know , Nazi architecture borrowed a lot from architectural styles as represented by Le Corbusier.
Obviously, modern architectural styles had some influence on the Nazis but at the end of the day they rejected that kind of architecture and they borrowed more from older styles. But all of this isn't really surprising since architectural styles usually borrow certain features from their predecessors (except for the modernists of the early 20th century).

Quote:
Have the peoples from the APH forum told you that
Got another explanation?
__________________
Free German passport

"I think it's a privilege to call yourself a Wunderbarler and it's something that you have to earn."

Highcliff liked this post
Kampflamm no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2007, 11:43 PM   #149
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by C-Beam View Post
If they were it is sad that they didn't continue with the former Nazi style.
ROFL
Thankfully thats just your opinion.
I honestly doubt though that youve got any idea whatsoever what Nazi-architecture is all about and what your statemnt implies....
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2007, 12:08 AM   #150
GNU
Gnuru
 
GNU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brave GNU World
Posts: 2,749
Likes (Received): 35

Ive just finished typing the article in. Took me quite a while....
I suggest that both of you guys pay attention and read carefully:

Bomben für den Aufbau

Den NS-Architekten kam der Luftkrieg gerade recht. Er beseitigte viele alte Baustrukturen, die den Neuerungsvorhaben des „Führers“ im Wege waren. Nach 1945 kamen die Nazi-Planer erneut zum Zug und prägten den Wiederaufbau des zerstörten Landes nach Hitlers Ideen.

Bereits früher hatte Hitler Positives im Feuersturm entdeckt. So sagte er Ende Juni 1943 dem Tagebuchschreiber Goebbels: „Dass die Städte selbst in ihrem Kern getroffen werden, ist von einer höheren Warte aus gesehen nicht ganz so schlimm. Die Städte stellen keine guten Bilder im ästhetischen Sinne dar. Die meisten Industriestädte sind schlecht angelegt, muffig und miserabel gebaut. Wir werden durch die britischen Luftangriffe hier Platz bekommen.
Die Neubaupläne, die für das Ruhrgebiet entworfen sind, hätten sich sonst ja sowieso immer an den vorhandenen Gegebenheiten gestoßen“.
Schon damals – nicht erst im berüchtigten „Nero-Befehl“ vom März 1945 – liebäugelte der Führer mit der Totalzerstörung.

Nicht nur Kriegsherr Hitler sah in den alliierten Flächenbombardements die Chance, Deutschlands Städte neu zu gestalten. Auch viele Architekten und Planer der NS-Zeit freuten sich auf diese „einmalige Gelegenheit in der Geschichte“.
Bereits während des Krieges hatte eine ganze Reihe von ihnen in großem Stil mit den Planungen für die Zeit danach begonnen.

So meinte ein Mitglied des „Arbeitsstabs Wiederaufbauplanung zerstörter Städte“, der Hamburger Architekt Konstanty Gutschow, im Frühjahr 1944: „Dem allergrößten Teil der baulichen Zerstörung (Hamburgs) weinen wir keine Träne nach“ – blanker Zynismus angesichts der Tatsache, dass in Hamburg im Juli 1943 bei den alliierten Bombardements 40.000 Menschen umgekommen sind und die Hälfte der Bausubstanz zerstört wurde.
Die Mentalität der NS-Städtebauer belegt auch eine Stellungnahme des Bremer Baurates Wilhelm Wortmann vom Dezember 1943: „Der Krieg und besonders der Luftkrieg versetzt der Grosstadt von gestern und heute den Todesstoss und schlägt eine mächtige Bresche für den Kampf um ihre umfassende Gesundung und wahre Neugestaltung.“
Dass Wortmann nach 1945 den Aufbau Bremens maßgeblich mitbestimmt hat, ist nur einer von vielen Belegen für einen ernüchternden Befund: Es gab im Städtebau keine „Stunde null“. Den Wiederaufbau führten nach 1945 die Städteplaner durch, die diesen in wesentlichen Grundzügen schon während des Krieges vorbereitet hatten.
Lediglich die braune Tünche musste abgestreift, mancher NS-Baufunktionär als der Sache verpflichteter Technokrat entnazifiziert werden.
Mehr brauchte es nicht.
Die Zerstörung der historisch gewachsenen Strukturen deutscher Grosstädte war seit der NS-Machtergreifung 1933 vorbestimmt gewesen: Auch ohne Bombenkrieg wäre deren Zuschnitt entscheidend verändert worden.
……….

Der „Führer“ wollte in den Städten Platz schaffen für Millionen Autos: „Ich sehe die Entwicklung des Verkehrs vor mir und weiß, dass in zehn Jahren besonders der Kraftwagenverkehr ein ungeheuer sein wird.“

………….

Die Planvorgaben für Berlin waren Vorbild für andere Städte: 1939 waren bereits 18 Städte für den Umbau vorgesehen, und im Sommer 1940 – nach dem Sieg über Frankreich – befahl Hitler ein umfassendes Bauprogramm: In den deutschen Grosstädten sollte sich die „Größe unseres Sieges“ in der Monumentalität neuer bauten und urbaner Räume wiederspiegeln.
Bis Frühjahr 1941 waren 41 Städte in das „Umbauprogramm des Führers“ einbezogen, darunter die fünf „Führerstädte“, die besonders aufwendig verändert werden sollten:
Berlin und Nürnberg durch Albert Speer, Hamburg durch Konstanty Gutschow, München durch Hermann Giesler und Linz durch Roderich Fick. Tausende Architekten, Ingenieure, Techniker, Bauzeichner und Bildhauer arbeiteten in den Planungsstäben – allein in Berlin waren es zeitweilig über 1000, in München über 700 und in Hamburg 250 Personen.
Das Bild der Städte hätte sich entscheidend verändert:

…………………..

Die während des Bombenkrieges zu Tage getretene Geringschätzung der historischen Bausubstanz zeichnete sich damals schon in vollem Ausmaß ab: Die Planer nahmen keinerlei Rücksicht, denn ihre Umgestaltungsprojekte erforderten riesige städtische Räume, die nur durch eine entsprechende Abrisspolitik zu gewinnen gewesen wären.
…….
Allein für die Umgestaltung Berlins sah sein Stab die Vernichtung von 53 624 Wohnungen vor. Ganze Straßenzüge wurden zwischen 1939 und 1942 platt gemacht – obwohl die Briten bereits massierte Luftangriffe flogen. In den Worten der Speer-Beamten „erleichterten“ die britischen Bomber die Abrissarbeit durch „wertvolle Vorarbeit für Zwecke der Neugestaltung“.Auch in anderen Städten waren radikale Eingriffe in die Bausubstanz vorgesehen: In Köln etwa hätte ein monumentales Achsenkreuz in Nord-Süd- und Ost-West-Richtung das Gefüge der Innenstadt völlig verändert. München sollte durch Monumentalbauten völlig neu gestaltet werden. Die Planungen, die das Ende der historisch gewachsenen Stadtkultur in Deutschland bedeutet hätten, waren bis 1942 in vollem Gang. Dann aber vernichteten die alliierten Flächenbombardements massenhaft Wohnraum, und die Zielvorgaben der NS-Städteplaner musste zwangsläufig geändert werden.

…………….

Bekanntlich war auch Hitler ein Technikfanatiker, der „neuartige Baustoffe wie Stahl, Eisen, Glas und Beton“ pries.
Die Städte sollten allerdings nicht nur durch repräsentative NS-Architektur grundlegend umgestaltet werden. Die Grosstadt galt den Nazis als Produkt einer durch Industrialisierung verursachten Fehlentwicklung, als „Schädling am Volkstum“, „als biologischer Krankheitsherd“.
So wurde seit der Machtergreifung über die Gestaltung der Grosstadt vor allem unter ideologischen Prämissen diskutiert: Die „gesunde“ bäuerlich-kleinstädtische Lebensweise sollte in die Stadt transferiert werden. Das Regime sah darin die Voraussetzung für das gewünschte Bevölkerungswachstum.
Die NS-Raumplaner hatten Thesen aus der internationalen Diskussion über den Städtebau der Zukunft übernommen – von der Idee der „Gartenstadt“ bis hin zum Konzept der funktionellen Stadt Le Corbusiers. Diese Ideen wurden nach den rasse- und bevölkerungspolitischen Zielen ausgerichtet: Die NS-Wohnungspolitik wollte ein dörfliches Gemeinschaftsleben auf „Siedlungszellen“ in einen neu zu gestaltenden städtischen „Lebensraum“ übertragen.
………………….

Parallel zum prunkvollen Umbau der deutschen Städte sollte ein „Wohnungsbauprogramm des Führers“ in Gang gesetzt werden: Propagiert wurde nun die industrielle Serienfertigung von genormten Wohnungen – „für die breite Masse“, „mit geringstmöglichem“ Aufwand an Arbeit und Material“. Damit war zu Beginn der vierziger Jahre das Modell der künftigen nationalsozialistischen Grosstadt festgelegt, das den Ordnungsvorstellungen des Regimes entsprach. Die „steinerne Stadt“ als urbaner Verdichtungsraum sollte von der aufgelockerten, gegliederten „Stadtlandschaft“ abgelöst werden: In der Innenstadt die repräsentativen monumentalen Bauwerke von Staat und Partei einschließlich Geschäftszentren. An der Peripherie die mehrgeschossigen Mietwohnungsareale, davon getrennt die Industriebetriebe.
Hitlers Architekt für Hamburg, Konstanty Gutschow, entwickelte in seinem Generalbebauungsplan vom November 1940 das Konzept einer „organischen Stadtlandschaft“ erstmals für eine Grosstadt: „Nicht mehr wie ein Pfannkuchen soll sich das Häusermeer über die Umgebung ausbreiten, sondern in wohlgeordneten Gemeinschaften, die dem geschlossenen Dorf oder der Kleinstadt gleichen“ – zwecks neuer „Gemeinschaftsbildung unsers Volkes in Anlehnung and seine politische Neugliederung“.

……………….


Aus den Planungsstäben für die Umgestaltung der Städte wurden so notgedrungen Stäbe für den Wiederaufbau. Die „Richtlinien für den baulichen Luftschutz im Städtebau“ schrieben den betroffenen Städten bereits 1942 eine „weiträumige Gestaltung der „Städte und Siedlungen“ vor. Von der dezentralen Stadt erhoffte man, sie werde weniger Angriffesflächen für Luftangriffe bieten als herkömmliche Stadtzentren.
Im Oktober 1943 beauftragte Hitler Albert Speer, den Neuaufbau der zerstörten Städte planerisch und organisatorisch vorzubereiten.

……………..

In seiner Ansprache am Neujahrstag 1944 beteuerte Hitler, dass „nach dem Krieg zwei bis drei Millionen Wohnungen pro Jahr“ gebaut würden. Dann tönte er: „Wir werden unsere Städte schöner bauen, als sie vorher waren. Der organisierte nationalsozialistische Volksstaat wird in wenigen Jahren die Spuren dieses Krieges beseitigt haben. Aus den Ruinen wird eine neue deutsche Städteherrlichkeit erblühen.“
Seinem Propagandaminister erklärte Hitler was er damit meinte: „Es ist klar, das unsere im Mittelalter gebauten alten Städte zum großen Teil für den modernen Verkehr gar nicht aufgeschlossen werden können. Eine Stadt wie Magdeburg etwa passt in die heutige Zeit nicht mehr hinein. Es kann deshalb im Hinblick auf die Gegenwart bedauert werden, dass der Feind uns hier eine Vorarbeit leistet; für die Zukunft wird daraus nur Segen entspringen.“
Die Vorgaben ihres „Führers“ nahmen Hitlers Architekten gern auf. Speer setzte einen „Arbeitsstab Wiederaufbauplanung“ ein, der die „einmalige Gelegenheit in der Geschichte benutzen“ wollte, „unsere deutschen Städte schöner und zweckmäßiger wiederaufzubauen“.
Alles, was unter den deutschen Architekten und Städteplanern Rang und Namen hatte, wurde im Verlauf des Jahres 1944 in den Arbeitsstab einbezogen – darunter Planungsexperten wie Konstanty Gutschow, dessen frühere Mitarbeiter Rudolf Hillebrecht und Wilhelm Wortmann oder der Bauchef der deutschen Arbeitsfront, Julius Schulte-Frohlinde. Im Frühjahr 1945 stieß sogar der spätere Bundespräsident, Baurat Heinrich Lübke, zum Arbeitsstab Speer dazu.

Die Planer Gutschow und Hillebrecht machten Anfang 1944 eine Rundreise durch 24 zerstörte Städte. Erfreut konstatierten sie zwischen den Trümmern allenthalben Bestätigung für „Führers“ Konzept. Jedenfalls, so schrieben sie, werde dessen Ruf nach dem Stadtbau mit aufgelockerter Gliederung, geringer Besiedlungsdichte und Flachbauweise „durch Luftkriegserfahrung als richtig unterstrichen“.
Speers Aufbaustab zog im Sommer 1944 in ein lufkriegssicheres Barackenlager in Wriezen bei Berlin um. Dort entstand ein Zwischenbericht, der die planerische Verantwortung für den Neuaufbau der zerstörten Städte aufteilte.
So entstand ein Netzwerk, das auch nach Kriegsende hielt und den Wiederaufbau gestalten sollte. Konstanty Gutschow etwa war von Speer für die Planung Hamburgs, Kassels und Wilhelmshavens vorgesehen. Die Briten, die den Hamburg-Experten im Sommer 1945 zunächst als Chef der Hamburger Wiederaufbaubehörde eingesetzt hatten, entließen ihn zwar bald darauf als politisch belastet. Aber der Mann kam andernorts unter. Denn Friedrich Tamms, ein anderes Mitglied des braunen Stabes, durfte 1948/49 den Neugestaltungsplan für Düsseldorf erstellen und holte anschließend Kostanty Gutschow mitsamt einer Reihe früherer Mitstreiter and den Rhein. Einer von ihnen, Julius Schulte-Frohlinde, durfte den Düsseldorfern in den fünfziger Jahren sogar das städtische Verwaltungsgebäude im klassischen NS-Stil bauen.
Besonders beispielhaft wurde die Vision der NS-Städteplaner in Hannover umgesetzt – kein Wunder, denn dort hatte man Rudolf Hillebrecht 1948 zum Stadtbaurat gewählt. Hillebrecht zog seinen früheren Chef Gutchow als Berater heran, und beide konnten in den fünfziger Jahren Hannover nach den im Krieg entwickelten Vorstellungen aufbauen. Die Stadt an der Leine galt in den fünfziger Jahren als Modell einer modernen Stadtgestaltung.


Zentraler Leitfaden für den Städtebau der Nachkriegszeit war das 1948 vom früheren Stadtbaumeister Stettins, Hans Bernhard Reichow, veröffentlichte Buch mit dem Titel „Organische Stadtbaukunst. Von der Grosstadt zur Stadtlandschaft“ – die bereinigte Fassung einer Publikation aus dem Jahr 1941.Wurde damals die „Stadtlandschaft“ in den volkstumspolitischen Kontext eingebunden, so war die NS-Terminologie jetzt getilgt. Aus der „Siedlungszelle“ wurde das Konzept der „Nachbarschaft“. Auch dass der öffentliche Mietwohnungsbau nach den standardisierten Normen preisgünstiger Massenproduktion durchgeführt wurde, hatte die „Deutsche Arbeitsfront“ bereits 1940 in ihrem Konzept des „sozialen Wohnungsbaus“ formuliert.

Am Ende behielt Städtezerstörer Hitler Recht mit seiner Voraussage: „Berlin und Hamburg, München und Köln, Kassel und alle anderen großen und kleinen beschädigten Städte wir man wenige Jahre nach Kriegsende kaum mehr wiedererkennen!“
Dafür sorgten schon Albert Speers Mannen, die den Wiederaufbau in der alten Bundesrepublik mit ihrem ideologisch bereinigten NS-Städtebaukonzept bis ins Einzelne prägten.
Hitlers Voraussage, die Städte würden „schöner errichtet, als sie vorher waren“, haben die alten Baumeister allerdings nicht erfüllt.
__________________

Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by GNU; June 12th, 2007 at 12:17 AM.
GNU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2007, 04:03 PM   #151
Okan
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Munih - Germany
Posts: 1,002
Likes (Received): 4

Beautiful photos of Germany at the end of the 19th century.Unfortunately most of these building are destroyed while the second World War.Most cities in Germany were total destroyed while WWII.Only a few cities like HEIDELBERG for example are still today beautiful
Okan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2007, 08:31 PM   #152
LoveCPH
Bonsoir l'Europe!
 
LoveCPH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Copenhagen
Posts: 765
Likes (Received): 9

Oh, what a debate.

Checker danke for the pictures, good to see them again

I'm wondering why there's a picture of "Ungdomshuset" it was'nt that speciel.

I found a book last week in a second-hand bookshop, about modern german architecture, it's from the 30's
I think "nazi" architecture is impressive and has some features from art deco
__________________
ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸, Siete giovani, godete la vita! ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø
LoveCPH no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2007, 04:38 PM   #153
KoolKeatz
█████████
 
KoolKeatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Berlin
Posts: 979
Likes (Received): 102

I want our old citys back!!! Every building from the 50s to the 80s is a shame against these beauty buildings from the past.

Thanks a lot for the pics Kampflamm!
KoolKeatz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 03:47 AM   #154
VicFontaine
Registered User
 
VicFontaine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Göttingen, Hannover, Brisbane
Posts: 309
Likes (Received): 8

seeing this, I guess Germanys golden ages are over lol
VicFontaine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 04:44 PM   #155
zwischbl
Registered User
 
zwischbl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Munich / Buenos Aires [x]
Posts: 315
Likes (Received): 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveCPH View Post
I think "nazi" architecture is impressive and has some features from art deco
for sure nazi architecture doesnt have any featres from art deco.
the nazis despised art deco. it was too little strict for them.
they especially demolished buildings for they were art deco. for example: the "atelier elvira" in münchen.
zwischbl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2007, 11:11 PM   #156
erbse
LIBERTINED
 
erbse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: McLenBurg
Posts: 43,231
Likes (Received): 57901

Some depressing pics for ma mates =)

If I may add some impressions of the formerly splendid and fantastic Alexanderplatz

(Btw: You can find such pics on the phenomenal extensive German bildindex.de - there you're able to find tons of authentic historic photographs, paintings and plans from nearly every German city/town/place, it's insane. Just search for the city on the left scrollbar and then choose your preferences from different sections. Quite recommendable for architecture-enthusiasts )

Here we go:













































But, unfortunately, suddenly the emerging Bauhaus-style began to disfugure the Alexanderplatz (in the 30s)... An early beginning of the Alex' fall

On the right hand you see one of the 2 new blocky-buildings by Behring, considered as astonishing "modern" that time:




And finally, we had a bunch of melting grandeur (thanks to the guy with the funny mustache):




All the formerly magnificence is gone forever... Nobody would launch into a complete reconstruction of that whole overwhelming place

It really is one hell of a beauty today... And they continued the bilious new "style":



And also the formerly "Belle-Alliance-Platz" might be worth a mention - it was one of Europe's finest places.

Before WW2:




The uncolored version of a picture already posted here, Hallesches Tor at Belle-Alliance-Platz


Today it's called "Mehringplatz" and is merely an unpleasant, social dump. No wonder if you look at that horrible architecture...






At least you get the idea of our capitals' former beauty. You can almost feel the sad affliction of today's Berlin... It's just so awful. I can't dry my tears
__________________
GET FREE!
D W F


🔥 Tradition doesn't mean to look after the ash, but to keep the flame alive! 🔥

Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by erbse; October 8th, 2007 at 01:53 AM.
erbse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2007, 12:26 AM   #157
Kampflamm
Endorsed by the NRA
 
Kampflamm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Occupied Europe
Posts: 23,659

Too bad the only thing that survived the war are those shitty Bauhauses.
__________________
Free German passport

"I think it's a privilege to call yourself a Wunderbarler and it's something that you have to earn."

Highcliff liked this post
Kampflamm no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2007, 01:52 AM   #158
erbse
LIBERTINED
 
erbse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: McLenBurg
Posts: 43,231
Likes (Received): 57901

Can't stop it ;)

Agreed, damn robust ferroconcrete monstrosities... Why doesn't concrete burn like straw?

Anyway, we shouldn't forget about another beauty of the old Berlin: The Potsdamer Platz. Now I'm gonna show you something more about that grand place.

Today it's probably Berlin's most modern and also a quite fascinating place - but before WW2, it was just a jewel of great classical architecture that is just irreplaceable


As this aerial pic shows quite well, the Potsdamer Platz was once entire Europes busiest place...




(Yeah, there's "American Drinks" written on top of the building in the middle )








Quite international back then




































Early neon lights










The ashes that had been left after 1945...







The letters are saying "eat fish!"




Probably it had been an easy move to rebuild those beauties. But, you know, the dogma said "we have to build some crappy shitty ugly bulky boxes all over the city, that architecture is the past - we're looking for the future, so we have to make this place car-friendly". Dammit...


Behind the wall: A desert...










http://gsb.download.bva.bund.de/BR/s...er/img/8-3.jpg




Today you can see a glimp of the iron curtain, combined with some amazing modern architecture. But still, no comparison to its earlier presence



image hosted on flickr


[IMG]http://img.******************/photos/10185177.jpg[/IMG]

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


[IMG]http://img.******************/photos/7813662.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://img.******************/photos/8384181.jpg[/IMG]

image hosted on flickr


[IMG]http://img.******************/photos/5547100.jpg[/IMG]

Oh anyhow -we've got a single reconstruction at the Potsdamer Platz - the traffic light



image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


[IMG]http://img.******************/photos/2447196.jpg[/IMG]

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Let's adore it again the last time for today
[IMG]http://img.******************/photos/4022122.jpg[/IMG]

Sorry for the size of some pics, but you have to see some details to really appreciate it...

And cordial thanks for the attention you paid.
__________________
GET FREE!
D W F


🔥 Tradition doesn't mean to look after the ash, but to keep the flame alive! 🔥

Highcliff liked this post
erbse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2007, 02:01 AM   #159
Novak
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 282
Likes (Received): 7

http://www.bildindex.de/bilder/MI03496g06a.jpg
I wonder what that that little classical "temple" on the right was?

and by the way.. what are the current plans regarding the Potsdamer Stadtschloss?
Novak no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2007, 02:11 AM   #160
Kampflamm
Endorsed by the NRA
 
Kampflamm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Occupied Europe
Posts: 23,659

They're so called "Torbauten" (there was another one across the steet), built by Schinkel, as sort of gates to Leipziger Platz (or Potsdamer Platz). I don't think they served a particular purpose though.
__________________
Free German passport

"I think it's a privilege to call yourself a Wunderbarler and it's something that you have to earn."

Highcliff liked this post
Kampflamm no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
alemania, classic architecture, classic europe, galerie, gdańsk, heritage, historical architecture

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu