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Old March 25th, 2017, 06:13 AM   #41
ssiguy2
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The latest APTA stats are out and transit ridership was down 2% nationwide.

The largest declines in in bus-only systems which is universally the non-legacy systems where bus ridership is down 5%. If it wasn't for a 8% increase in SF and mild declines in Boston and NY then the overall numbers would be down much more. Again proves that only the legacy systems are the ones that are truly viable.

The poor ridership systems continue to decline reinforcing the idea that cities should be entertaining viable options for public transportation that does not necessarily depend on buses for it's primary or sole technology or service model.
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Old March 26th, 2017, 06:33 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy2 View Post
The latest APTA stats are out and transit ridership was down 2% nationwide.

The largest declines in in bus-only systems which is universally the non-legacy systems where bus ridership is down 5%. If it wasn't for a 8% increase in SF and mild declines in Boston and NY then the overall numbers would be down much more. Again proves that only the legacy systems are the ones that are truly viable.

The poor ridership systems continue to decline reinforcing the idea that cities should be entertaining viable options for public transportation that does not necessarily depend on buses for it's primary or sole technology or service model.
A few of the culprits in making public transportation successful throughout the United States include:

- Funding. A lot of these transit agencies rely on multiple funding sources, from Federal to local governments, in which if some of those grants dry up due to policy issues, it becomes risky for such agencies to maintain their level of service. This becomes even more important if its operations are contracted out to private operators like MV or Transdev where their philosophy is "more ridership means more revenue, and cutting costs equals more profits".

- Network complexity. A more complex network serving neighborhoods can lead to some lines being less productive than others, especially if those lines are poorly timed for transfers to other lines. A side problem of this issue is congestion where schedule tardiness can result in multiple missed connections, dragging reliability down, especially in suburban areas.

- The core idea of transit as a social good versus a machine for profit. Some transit agencies want to cut costs immensely by letting third party operators do many of the work (e.g. vehicle operations, maintenance, scheduling, administration, etc). The consequence of such action include poor service, poor maintenance regimen, and less opportunities for career growth and development, leading to dissatisfied riders if their services get cut unjustifiably. While transit agencies aim to balance their budgets each and every fiscal year, it is normal for many of them to run losses since those provide a social purpose of transporting people around for lower costs than driving, which should be accepted as a reality.
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Old March 26th, 2017, 08:00 AM   #43
Miami High Rise
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Really not going to mention Uber

Bringing this onto current page:

Miami does suffer from those issues, the increased congestion making the bus suck.

Bus was at around 250,000 steady for a while, and now has been below 200,000 for many months, as low as 190,000
It's highest was almost 300,000, so it's a loss of like 15 to 35% depending on how you measure it. And this is in a city, county,
and metro area with strong growth both population-wise and economically, so it's now at less ridership than it was in the
late 90s when the population was over half a million less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miami High Rise View Post
In Miami, the bus system (Metrobus) has been hemorrhaging riders since 2014, and is now down to the worst ridership since online records began in 1998!

Uber, old buses, and increasing surface traffic (which makes B grade public transport (bus) worse as well), are all blamed, along with other poor service complaints.

In 2015, along with diving gas prices, the single line heavy metro (Metrorail) started to decline, and by late 2016, even the urban people mover (Metromover) in the
thriving downtown area is showing a little stagnation and even decline.
Given the atmosphere of Miami, I'm surprised Metrorail made it through the early years of poor ridership, to the tune of only 20 to 40,000, since in a couple spots it
passes through very quiet and fairly affluent low density neighborhoods such as the downtown-adjacent "The Roads". Since 2012 with a new station opening (and tech-
nically a one station second "line"), ridership has been building pretty steady and became well over a whopping 70k, but now is back to scraping the bottom of the 70
thousands, and numbers are still holding poor despite great population growth and economy numbers out of all of Florida. The Miami proper is small but it as well as
some nearby suburbs are well over 10k per sq mile density at this point. There is a recent groundswell to greatly improve the transit network, billions are spent on the
highways and roads ever decade, money does exist, but all area transit with the exception of the downtown people mover (Metromover) has very low ridership per mile
and per population.
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Old March 26th, 2017, 10:37 PM   #44
ssiguy2
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The reality is that US cities enjoy, on average, higher government subsidies than Canadian ones on a per-capita basis.

By bringing up this topic I am reaffirming my belief that providing public transportation is an essential service and at NO point in this conversation have I even suggested the idea of getting rid of public transit. Quite the contrary I am very concerned about public transport in US cities and see that the current model for many US cities and citizens is a dismal failure costing a small fortune yet providing offensively poor service to the citizens who need it the most. To my way of thinking, with plunging ridership and beyond lousy service, maintaining the status quo is an affront to the poorer of our society.

Whether it's a communal taxi model, a truly robust and well funded van-pool system, or even a subsidized Uber system set up with people who have gone thru criminal record checks and a clean driving record, cities with pathetic ridership levels must begin to look outside the box. The current system is bleeding tax dollars yet providing a poor service............somehow cities, urban planners, and politicians have got it in their heads that public urban transport has to revolve around a bus. That policy started in the 1920s and was a viable at the time but that policy does not reflect the reality of US transportation needs, demographics, or urban form of the 21st century
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