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Old December 20th, 2016, 10:57 AM   #41
ayanamikun
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Agia Sophia

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: Cross-in-Square
Date: 1350


Once the Catholic of the Zothochou Christou monastery




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Old December 20th, 2016, 11:07 AM   #42
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Agioi Theodori

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: Octagon
Date: 1296



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Old December 20th, 2016, 11:34 AM   #43
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Pantanassa

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: Three aisled basilica and Cross-in-Square
Date: 1428


Murals are original, circa 1430






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Old December 20th, 2016, 11:43 AM   #44
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Perivleptos

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: Cross-in-Square
Date: around 1350


Its murals are one of the most important remnants of Byzantine art, as not even in Constantinople are there examples of such preserved condition.
Their date is between 1350-1375






No point posting more photos as there is an interactive 360 interior shot of the murals:



http://www.360cities.net/image/perib...church-mystras
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Old December 20th, 2016, 12:16 PM   #45
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They all look extremely beautiful and genuine. Thank's for contributing in this thread. My personal favorite is Pantanassa, because the dome of the church bell looks very unique, also it has some marble details which we don't see a lot in Byzantine exteriors.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 12:40 PM   #46
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As far as Byzantine art here's one example Saint George the Victorious monastery, Rajchica, Macedonia.
The interior is lovely, most of the interiors in the Byzantine churches look like this, or have similarities.


Олтарот на црквата „Св. Ѓорѓи Победоносец“ - Рајчица [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], by Stotosenik (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

In the church there are parts of the remains of the hand of St George. The remains of Saint George from the 4th century are embedded in gold-plated silver in the form of a hand.


Source: http://whereismacedonia.org/where-to...-rajcica-debar
Rakata na Sv.Gorgija od Rajcica by Stojče Bogdanovski, on Flickr
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Old December 20th, 2016, 12:57 PM   #47
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St Dimetrius

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: Three aisled basilica and Cross-in-Square
Date: 1270


In this church, the last Byzantine Emperor was crowned, in 1449



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Old December 20th, 2016, 01:17 PM   #48
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Odigitria

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: Three aisled basilica and Cross-in-Square
Date: 1322


Note that the masonry in most of the churches is the typical in Byzantine Greece, with stones encased in bricks
The domes are different of the Athenian Type.
Another important aspect of the monuments of the Fortress City of Mystras is the original surviving murals, meaning pre-1453



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Old December 20th, 2016, 01:53 PM   #49
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I absolutely adore the domes, especially the dancy edges.
It's weird how people doesn't seem to be familiar with this particular style, I've seen revivals in the recent decades, but from most of them I'm not impressed, I always prefer the originals. Maybe if a new Hagia Sophia look-alike church is constructed with the same size and proportions it will get people interested in this particular style. In this thread, so far we have so many genuine examples, we should get our inspiration from them. The outside of such church should be terracotta, the smaller domes should be terracotta too and the biggest central dome should be some sort of metal, for example bronze. Now if we only had the possibility to construct such architectural marvel again.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 02:57 PM   #50
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Indeed. Modern examples try to mimic some features, but fail miserably. Thats because the materials themselves are crucial, stone and brick that by itself gives the decorative elements.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 03:12 PM   #51
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I agree completely with your attitude. That's why I've been saying for quite some time on the forums that I don't like postmodern architecture, because no matter how hard it tries to mimic historical styles it almost always fails to bring the care for delicate details and materials. Only real expertise and passion for historical styles could bring some architectural revivals. Knowledge is the most important aspect and then the implantation with carefully planed use of materials.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 03:33 PM   #52
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http://www.architecturaldigest.com/s...tery-australia



Australia's first Byzantine monastery

http://www.pantanassamonastery.org/
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Old December 20th, 2016, 04:20 PM   #53
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That's precisely the sort of 'revivals' we discuss with ayanamikun. I mean you can see yourself the obvious differences with the originals that we posted.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 04:30 PM   #54
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Evangelistria

Area: Mystras, Sparti
Type: simple Cross-in-Square
Date: early 1400s


Ok, so there is a repeating pattern here, but we are almost done with Mystras.
The small scale of the churches is somewhat characteristic of Byzantine Architecture, or to be more precise its later phase
Even in cases where there is a large population the demand is covered by building more churches than bigger ones.

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Old December 20th, 2016, 04:36 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ayanamikun View Post
Before presenting more specific examples, Its important to highlight the very hard work which goes into the restoration of the last vestige of the Byzantine state in Mystras.
This example is extremely beautiful, the reconstructed parts look very nice. In my country, the most important reconstruction process goes to Ohrid, they try to reconstruct the university around Plaošnik, the church is posted on the first page of this thread. The whole site is 250 meters below Samuil's Fortress. In the future, the whole complex will have konaks as in the time of Saint Clement of Ohrid, together with several surrounding objects.
Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plao%C5%A1nik
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Old December 20th, 2016, 07:16 PM   #56
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I'll post some other examples before moving to Thessaloniki

Not sure if it is canonical to consider post 1453 buildings as Byzantine, because the scope of the research widens and blurs significantly. ..

Kosmosoteira

Area: Feres, Thrace
Type: Cross-in-Square
Date: 1151


Not much of the interior decoration survives though. Similar in style with examples in Constantinople


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Old December 21st, 2016, 04:57 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
That's precisely the sort of 'revivals' we discuss with ayanamikun. I mean you can see yourself the obvious differences with the originals that we posted.
What do you mean? It's modelled exactly on Byzantine design, a church in Greece and of course there's going to be some difference, I mean the weathering of materials for starters, but it's authentic as far as traditional Byzantine design is concerned, no? It's not 'modernist Byzantine', which I understand can look odd.

contemporary neo-Byzantine...somewhat odd but interesting nonetheless.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:33 AM   #58
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The Australian building is certainly far more faithful; the shape of the building is undoubtedly closer to the original.

The problem however is the choice of materials, colors and details. The perfectly cut stone, the strange color of it, the random choice of masonry, the plain and undecorative dome. there is also the problem that the building is made of concrete and just covered in stone tiles, and the overall choice of decoration doesn't hide it.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:24 AM   #59
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Wonderful thread. The Byzantine Empire fascinates me. The architecture is stunning
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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:30 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ayanamikun View Post
The Australian building is certainly far more faithful; the shape of the building is undoubtedly closer to the original.

The problem however is the choice of materials, colors and details. The perfectly cut stone, the strange color of it, the random choice of masonry, the plain and undecorative dome. there is also the problem that the building is made of concrete and just covered in stone tiles, and the overall choice of decoration doesn't hide it.
Of course the building will not be identical to a church built over a thousand years ago, but it still follows the strict canons of Byzantine architecture and was in fact co-designed by Greek architects from Greece and it used vernacular materials (as it should) and didn't hold back in expense with generous donations from the Greek community which is very affluent in Australia. Some would argue that it's even better and more attractive than other originals which look somewhat 'primitive', too rustic and haphazard, all a matter of taste really. BTW, the very best of Byzantine architecture is neither in Greece or FYROM but Anatolia and modern-day Turkey.
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