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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:57 AM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skymantle View Post
Of course the building will not be identical to a church built over a thousand years ago, but it still follows the strict canons of Byzantine architecture and was in fact co-designed by Greek architects from Greece and it used vernacular materials (as it should) and didn't hold back in expense with generous donations from the Greek community which is very affluent in Australia. Some would argue that it's even better and more attractive than other originals which look somewhat 'primitive', too rustic and haphazard, all a matter of taste really. BTW, the very best of Byzantine architecture is neither in Greece or FYROM but Anatolia and modern-day Turkey.
That is true. Only Thessaloniki has architectural examples that approach a bit that of Asia Minor/Constantinople.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 11:51 AM   #62
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Koimiseos Theotokou

Area: Argolida, Nafplio
Type: Cross-in-Square, octagonal dome
Date: 1200-1250

Some remnants of murals from the 1300s

Build using recycled stones from the ancient ruins nearby.



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Old December 21st, 2016, 11:56 AM   #63
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Koimiseos Theotokou (same as above)

Area: Argolida, Chonika
Type: complex Cross-in-Square
Date: 12th century


Typical masonry of the hellenic tradition, stones encased in bricks. Note the dome and part of the roof look like repairs of an unknown later period
Marble stones in Byzantine churches is almost certainly reused material from ancient ruins. They even did this with Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 12:16 PM   #64
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Staying roughly in the region

Koimiseos Theotokou (three times the charm)

Area: Arcadia, Tegea
Type:Cross-in-Square
Date: 11th century (?)


This was build on top of a temple of Alea Athena.
The stones come from the ancient theatre of Tegea.
Roof and dome collapsed in an earthquake in 1846, the top half rebuild in neobyzantine style by Ernst Ziller in 1889


several millennia of building phases in one photo.


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Old December 21st, 2016, 12:43 PM   #65
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Metamorphosis Sotira

Area: Messenia
Type: Complex Octagon
Date: late 11th century


A large church built by Emperor Alexios I Komnenos and used to be a cathedral
Encased masonry, use of marble lower on the walls.
Damaged from an earthquake in 1886, it remained unused ever since. Recently restored, sadly nothing from the interior decoration survives.



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Old December 21st, 2016, 01:35 PM   #66
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Hagia Sofia

Area: Monemvasia
Type: Octagon
Date: 1150


The surviving murals date from late 12th early 13th centuries
The exterior shows the scars of countless repairs and additions over the centuries.
Masonry style is therefore all over the place, the interior has also faded away



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Old December 21st, 2016, 03:19 PM   #67
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Metamorphosis tou Sotiros

Area: Phocis, Amfissa
Type: Cross-in-Square
Date: early 12th century (?)


Another small gem, encased masonry, Athenian Type dome with reused marble pieces, well preserved and recently restored. No surviving murals.



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Old December 21st, 2016, 05:14 PM   #68
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Panagia Skripous

Area: Orchomenos, Boeotia
Type: Cross-in-Square
Date: 873 AD


A very old and architecturally significant building, one of the very first examples of the "Cross-in-Square" style of floor plan.

The church is build using materials of the ancient ruins around it, including circular column drums.


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Old December 21st, 2016, 05:27 PM   #69
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Panagia Vlacherna

Area: Vlacherna, Arta
Type: three aisled basilica with domes
Date: last phase in 1250-1260


Several building phases, a basilica turned into a cross-in-square look alike, note the bizarre roof configuration
Some walls date as far back as the 800s


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Old December 21st, 2016, 05:38 PM   #70
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My search is slowed down by the endless number of small/tiny churches that don't seem interesting to be honest. I am trying to post the most important examples, thats for sure.
There is also the issue with post byzantine architecture. There is an endless number of churches that follow the architectural tradition but date to the ottoman empire years. Especially the monasteries, that most date after the 15th century. I'm not in favor of posting examples build after the end of the Byzantine state tbh..
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Old December 21st, 2016, 06:53 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skymantle View Post
Of course the building will not be identical to a church built over a thousand years ago, but it still follows the strict canons of Byzantine architecture and was in fact co-designed by Greek architects from Greece and it used vernacular materials (as it should) and didn't hold back in expense with generous donations from the Greek community which is very affluent in Australia. Some would argue that it's even better and more attractive than other originals which look somewhat 'primitive', too rustic and haphazard, all a matter of taste really. BTW, the very best of Byzantine architecture is neither in Greece or FYROM but Anatolia and modern-day Turkey.
I really don't want to turn this thread into one of those infamous threads. Please show some respect and you'll get it back. That's all, because I always say leave the misery to the politicians, people should respect each other as human beings.
As far as the church you posted, I wouldn't say it looks bad, but I can claim with a lot of certainty that it can look much much better. This next example is already posted, it's the church of Saint Panteleimon, in Ohrid. It's foundations are quite genuine and they date back in the centuries, but the structure above is actually completely new (infact early 2000), there is a metal bracing dividing the old with the new structure which can be seen in person, believe it or not it's organizations such as UNESCO that protect this heritage and when they see a reconstruction project they ask for it to be completely faithful to the originals. Enjoy the photos, try to learn to respect others no matter what some say, and of-course learn that it can always look better and more faithful to the originals, you only need good materials which don't seem economically too expensive.

Church in Ohrid by Peter Hahndorf, on Flickr

Lake Ohrid Church by Joseph Ferris III, on Flickr

More photos of the "recently" reconstructed beauty. A lot of other objects around her are being reconstructed.
Here you can even see the original faundations.
plaosnikk by Macedonia Travel, on Flickr

Sv.Kliment - Ohrid,Macedonia by vvv.kos, on Flickr

The ruins around.

IMG_8288 by Pamela Kuo, on Flickr
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Old December 21st, 2016, 06:54 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ayanamikun View Post
My search is slowed down by the endless number of small/tiny churches that don't seem interesting to be honest. I am trying to post the most important examples, thats for sure.
There is also the issue with post byzantine architecture. There is an endless number of churches that follow the architectural tradition but date to the ottoman empire years. Especially the monasteries, that most date after the 15th century. I'm not in favor of posting examples build after the end of the Byzantine state tbh..
You should continue the good work, thanks to you this thread appears much better, I love all the examples that you posted, some of them have the most unique domes I've ever seen! I especially like Hagia Sofia in Monemvasia, the contrast between the blue waters and the orange-brownish terracotta is striking.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 07:04 PM   #73
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Here's another one from Ohrid. St. Bogorodica Bolnicka
Macedonia-02756 - St. Bogorodica Bolnicka - Interesting Legend by Dennis Jarvis, on Flickr
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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:10 PM   #74
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Parigoritisa

Area: Arta
Type octagonal (unique)
Date: 1285-1289


A large church built by Emperor Nikephoros I Komnenos.
A simple in shape but impressive two-story exterior.





The interior is very bizarre to say the least, and has no other similar example in byzantine architecture.




The dome is supported by upside down pyramid of protruding columns, (taken from ancient buildings)
which increases the floor area under the dome otherwise occupied by pillars.
If this was planned from the start is unknown. It does look strange and rather uncanny and was never repeated in any other building.
Perhaps they thought the span was too big for a dome and so they tried to decrease it, who knows.
It is an engineering feat though, whether by calculation or trial and error.
Some wall decoration survives
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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:40 PM   #75
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Wow it looks impressive! Imagine how nice it would look if it had some renovations, it looks impressive even without them.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 11:28 PM   #76
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This church & the monastery dedicated to St. Leontius is located in the village of Vodoča (Vodocha) about five kilometers from the town of Strumica, Macedonia, and was built in multiple phases. This monastery is often referred to as the Vodočki monastery (Vodochki monastery).

The origins of the church begin in the 7th century and included marble floors and a marble iconostasis. Unfortunately, the monastery would be demolished in 1018 due to the defeat of King Samuel’s forces near the Strumica river by the army of Byzantine emperor, Basil II.

Parts of the church were rebuilt in the 11th and 12th centuries with the western narthex built in the 14th century. This monastery once served as a bishop’s basilica and as the main office for the Strumica bishopric.a

source










On the links you have 360 degree panoramas of the monastery and it's interior

http://www.360macedonia.com/%D1%81%D...2%D0%B8%D1%98/

http://www.360macedonia.com/%D1%81%D...2%D0%BE%D1%80/

the interior

http://www.360macedonia.com/%D1%81%D...2%D1%80%D0%B5/
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Old December 21st, 2016, 11:43 PM   #77
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Saint Nicetas (Nikita) is an 11th Century monastery & church located on the Skopska Crna Gora Mountain about 400 meters from the village of Gornjane, and 17.5 kilometers north of Skopje (30 minute drive).

In the late 12th century and early 13th century during the Serbian-Bulgarian wars, a large number of monasteries, including St. Nicetas were destroyed. In 1282 Serbian King Stefan Milutin took control of northern Macedonia, including the Skopje area and in 1299 King Milutin had the St. Nicetas Monastery restored.

The church was renovated gain in the early 14th century. Many of the Frescoes date to the 1310s & 1320s and the frescoes of this period were painted by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios (Mikhail and Eutihije).
source & more photos (too big photos, not suitable for this thread)

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Old December 22nd, 2016, 11:17 AM   #78
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Panagia Ekatontapiliani complex

Area: Paros Island, Aegean Sea

Type: Crossed Domed Basilica with chapels and baptistery
Date: circa 550 A.D.


A paleochristian basilica, possibly the most important Byzantine monument on the Aegean islands.
The main church structure was build under Emperor Justinian I, its age and scale suggests direct imperial financial support.
Build out of stone and marble, using a lot of ancient building materials, especially evident in the impressive interior. This
sets it apart from later styles, under the Makedonon and Komnenon Era.

Exterior



Interior. Reused ancient architectural parts everywhere, marble pilasters, columns, reliefs, the architraves too.






Note the ancient layout of the sanctuary



The baptistery


The chapel has ancient Doric columns and architraves
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Old December 22nd, 2016, 09:59 PM   #79
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The interior is as Byzantine as it can get, I love the grey pillars.
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Old December 22nd, 2016, 10:43 PM   #80
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I'll continue with the large basilicas of Thessaloniki before going back to the more traditional cross in square examples
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