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Old December 22nd, 2016, 11:03 PM   #81
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Thessaloniki was the second city of the Byzantine empire, both in size and importance.

This restoration shows the city in the 5-7th centuries. The style and architecture of the early Byzantine Empire was significantly different than the more familiar later periods, due to the long duration of the realm, that spanned from late antiquity, to late middle ages.






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Old December 22nd, 2016, 11:10 PM   #82
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Acheiropoietos

Area: Makedonomachon square, Thessaloniki
Type: three-aisled wooden roofed basilica
Date: 450–470 A.D.


Perhaps the earliest of the city's surviving churches, an monument of UNESCO. It was modified in the 7th and again in the 14th–15th centuries
Fragments of 5th-century mosaics and 13th century frescoes survive, depicting the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste




The single piece columns are green marble from Thessaly and the central nave pavement is still original from the 5th century, made by Proconnesian marble. The Ionic capitals are of the late antiquity - Constantinopolitan type. The central nave probably had a third level with windows, but subsequent fires reduced the building into what survives today.

[/QUOTE]

http://www.inthessaloniki.com/el/nao...-thessalonikis

The interior walls were covered in frescos, some of which survive and give an idea.




Under the northern aisle' floor 3 layers of mosaics exist, from bath buildings of late antiquity


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Old December 22nd, 2016, 11:58 PM   #83
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Agios Demetrios, Thessaloniki

Area: Agiou Dimitriou St
Type: five-aisled wooden roofed basilica
Date: 634 A.D.


The most important church in the city, and among the largest surviving byzantine buildings. Also UNESCO monument.



The few surviving mosaics represent a rare example of art from the Dark Ages in Europe that followed Justinian's death.


An inscription below one of the images glorifies heaven for saving the people of Thessaloniki from a pagan Slavic raid in 612 A.D.
The rest of the wall art was lost when the building functioned as a mosque.
A fire in 1917 gutted it completely. A recurring theme in wooden roofed basilicas. It wasn't reopened until 1949.

The long repairs however revealed an extensive crypt under the basilica.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/glasse...453293/sizes/l

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ccrrii/3767080920/sizes/l
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Old December 23rd, 2016, 03:38 PM   #84
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I know the last few basilicas are a departure of the more familiar brick and stone buildings of the later period, but we are almost done with them and will return to our usual cross-in-square churches after this one.
For me, one of the most important buildings of the first half of the Byzantine era

Hagia Sophia

Area: Hagias Sophias sq., Thessaloniki
Type: Domed Basilica
Date: between 620-700 A.D.






UNESCO world heritage site, with very well preserved mosaics that cover various periods. The mosaic of virgin Mary dates from 787-797 A.D, on the dome from late 9th century with an inscription of a bishop dating 880-885 A.D., the murals from 1037 A.D. etc.

It shares a lot of similarities with the Hagia Irene in Constantinople, but in this case the interior survives.





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Old December 24th, 2016, 12:58 AM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ayanamikun View Post
I know the last few basilicas are a departure of the more familiar brick and stone buildings of the later period, but we are almost done with them and will return to our usual cross-in-square churches after this one.
For me, one of the most important buildings of the first half of the Byzantine era

Hagia Sophia

Area: Hagias Sophias sq., Thessaloniki
Type: Domed Basilica
Date: between 620-700 A.D.


UNESCO world heritage site, with very well preserved mosaics that cover various periods. The mosaic of virgin Mary dates from 787-797 A.D, on the dome from late 9th century with an inscription of a bishop dating 880-885 A.D., the murals from 1037 A.D. etc.

It shares a lot of similarities with the Hagia Irene in Constantinople, but in this case the interior survives.

Sure it is a very important looking building. The exterior is stunning, but the interior is truly divine, I just love the shades of green stone that the pillars have, the walls are quite amazing too, it floats perfectly between the esoteric and the mystic, that's quite an ambient, keep up the good job.
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Old December 24th, 2016, 01:25 AM   #86
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This one was already shared, but I love this photo so much. The contrast between the nature and the landmark looks amazing.

Church of St. John at Kaneo, Ohrid by Sven Landmeter, on Flickr
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Old December 24th, 2016, 04:18 AM   #87
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Beautiful, it's a shame how byzantine architecture is usually ignored instead of being compared with that of western Europe. Maybe because the only trully monumental buildings were located in Constantinople and only small shrines survive in eastern Europe, Greece and the rest of Turkey.
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Old December 24th, 2016, 12:15 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMGA196 View Post
Beautiful, it's a shame how byzantine architecture is usually ignored instead of being compared with that of western Europe. Maybe because the only trully monumental buildings were located in Constantinople and only small shrines survive in eastern Europe, Greece and the rest of Turkey.
This is a usual misconception and not thoroughly true. Byzantine church architecture is in its core more humane and down to earth in contrast with the western one. Apart from the well known example of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople the typical byzantine church is not a monumental basilica but rather a place of worship of human proportions that aims to bring the congregation together and impose the mysticality that characterizes the eastern orthodox tradition.
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Old December 24th, 2016, 02:54 PM   #89
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Amazing thread, keep up the good work !
I don't know that in those terracota coloured brick building, there are(and were) beautiful mosaics. It looks like they keep the grandeur of the building in inside.
And about the smaller church and monastery, did they still used ?
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Old December 24th, 2016, 08:07 PM   #90
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Yes, the smaller churches are still in use, at least in Macedonia.
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Old December 24th, 2016, 09:29 PM   #91
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Panagia Chalkeon

Area: Dikastirion Square, Thessaloniki
Type: cross-in-square
Date: 1028


UNESCO World Heritage Site
Also called "Red Church", as it is made out of bricks. Only fragments of murals survive, circa 11th-14th century.



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Old December 24th, 2016, 10:10 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma Goldman-Sachs View Post
This is a usual misconception and not thoroughly true. Byzantine church architecture is in its core more humane and down to earth in contrast with the western one. Apart from the well known example of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople the typical byzantine church is not a monumental basilica but rather a place of worship of human proportions that aims to bring the congregation together and impose the mysticality that characterizes the eastern orthodox tradition.
Exactly, but I was referring about how since there are very few monumental byzantine constructions, they are usually ignored. When you compare it with Western Roman, Romanesque, Gothic architecture and other styles of the time, you can see most of these styles have hundreds of monumental buildings known all around the world. I really like Byzantine architecture though.

Any buildings survive that are not necessarily religious?
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Old December 24th, 2016, 10:54 PM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMGA196 View Post

Any buildings survive that are not necessarily religious?
Hmm there are some examples. Several city walls and forts of course. The Keep in Mystras.
Of course life and state orbited around the church in those times.
As we are in Thessaloniki, here is the Byzantine Bath in the Upper Old Town.

Late 12th/early 13th century. Follows the Roman example with the different temperature rooms. It was recently restored.


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Old December 24th, 2016, 11:42 PM   #94
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By the way, we should really start to talk about the amazing Basilica di San Marco, in Venice. Completed in 1092. You can see the mix between Byzantine architecture and the Gothic influence of the time in that part of Europe. Take into consideration that the facade was altered in the 13th Century.







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Old December 25th, 2016, 10:08 AM   #95
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Saint Catherine

Area: Old district, Thessaloniki
Type: cross-in-square
Date: unknown, before 1315


UNESCO World Heritage Site, the fragments from the murals date in 1315, but the date of the construction is unknown.



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Old December 25th, 2016, 01:10 PM   #96
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Probably a typo, but the church right above is the one of Saint Catherine in Thessaloniki, a perfect example of late byzantine palaeologian architecture.

As for non religious buildings there are also the basilica cistern, the palace of Porphyrogenitus, which underwent an unfortunate "restoration", the anastasian and theodosian walls all in today Istanbul. Is there any member from turkey intrested in posting these?
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Old December 25th, 2016, 01:40 PM   #97
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Yes yes, of course.
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Old December 25th, 2016, 07:00 PM   #98
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The last church of Saint Catherine, has to be one of the finest examples of remaining Byzantine architecture, i love the domes and the arches around the windows.
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Old December 26th, 2016, 12:20 AM   #99
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Monastery Holy Mother of God near the village of Matejche, Macedonia (XI century)

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The monastery was built in the 14th century on the ruins of an older, Byzantine Greek church built in 1057–59, evident in preserved Greek inscriptions.[1][2] It was mentioned for the first time in 1300 in a chrysobull of Serbian king Stefan Milutin (r. 1282–1321). In the mid-14th century, Serbian emperor Stefan Dušan (r. 1331–55) started reconstructing the monastery, finished by his son Stefan Uroš V in 1357 (becoming his endowment). Coins of Uros V has been found at the site.[3] Isaiah the Serb and Vladislav Gramatik lived in the monastery. In the 18th century the roof was removed by the Ottomans and put on the Eski Mosque in Kumanovo, after which it deteriorated. In 1926–34 the monastery was renovated.

It is designed in the cross-in-square plan (as is also Marko's Monastery and the Banja Monastery).[4] The dome bears the same exonarthex technique as Hilandar.[5] It was painted in 1356–57.
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Old December 26th, 2016, 12:26 AM   #100
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And one small church from the city of Prilep, Macedonia - St. Nickolas (XIII century)

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The church is situated in the village of Varosh in the vicinity of the city of Prilep. It is one-nave building with extremely defined vertical, with richly decorated facades of brickwork. According to the inscription in the naos, the building and the wall paintings were finished in 1298 by the donation of the local nobleman named Vekos and his wife Maria. The wall paintings from the period of the erection of the church are preserved in the naos (full-length figures, scenes from Passions and Great Feasts). During the 1380s the west part of the interior was painted by the assistants of the painter – Metropolitan Jovan.
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