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Old December 26th, 2016, 09:43 AM   #101
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Prophet Elijah

Area: Prophet Elijah street, Thessaloniki
Type: cross-in-square, Athonite type
Date: unknown, around 1300s (?)


UNESCO world heritage site.
Unknown date of construction, certainly in the Palaiologan period
Few murals survive, in the narthex mostly.
The dome is leaning to the east, I see no reference to it, but as the interior is restored and shows no deformation, so this might have happened during construction.





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Old December 26th, 2016, 01:09 PM   #102
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So far that has to be the most beautiful building we have in this thread, I really really like the triangular details around the edges of the window's arches, also the "columns" around the windows, in a way, resemble some Corinthian aspects if you pay attention more closely. Stunning. The front part is looking great with the smaller domes.
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Old December 26th, 2016, 03:36 PM   #103
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Indeed, you know your "bricks" as they say. Hadn't noticed that. it is similar to other examples as like on Saint Catherine now that I look back.
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Old December 26th, 2016, 04:01 PM   #104
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This summer I've noticed for the first time that they resemble Corinthian columns when I visited the Monastery of Saint Naum, in Ohrid, in person it's much easier to notice such delicate details.
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Old December 26th, 2016, 08:09 PM   #105
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Saint Panteleimon

Area: Iasonidou and Arrianou streets, Thessaloniki
Type: tetrastyle cross-in-square
Date: 1295


Its original dedication is disputed. Only fragments of murals survive.



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Old December 26th, 2016, 08:40 PM   #106
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Some smaller examples

The tiny church of the Saviour, Thessaloniki.
Of a rare square type, with preserved murals. Circa 1300s







Saint Nicholas Orphanos

Area: Irodotou and Apostolou Pavlou streets, Thessaloniki
Type: Single, later 3 aisled edifice
Date: 1310–1320


Surviving murals in good condition, from the time of construction


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Old December 26th, 2016, 08:41 PM   #107
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Vlatades Monastery

Area: Upper city, Thessaloniki
Type: ? Domed square?
Date: 11th century (?) (the church)


We are almost done from Thessaloniki.



The obvious additions are from later eras (17th 18th centuries ? )
The monastery continued to operate throughout the ottoman empire era, this Italian influenced portico was a bizarre choice.


Last edited by ayanamikun; December 26th, 2016 at 08:48 PM.
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Old December 27th, 2016, 11:28 AM   #108
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Although not very sure its admission in this thread, the Rotunda in Thessaloniki is considered part of its byzantine past. Also it is one of the most important buildings in the history of architecture and technically relevant to this thread

Rotunda, Church of Agios Georgios

Area: city center, Thessaloniki
Type: domed circular
Date: 306 A.D.


UNESCO world heritage site

Built by Roman Emperor Galerius in similar fashion to the Pantheon in Rome, in this case using bricks instead of concrete.

For what it was originally intended for is unknown, but Galerius died in 311 A.D. before it was finished. Perhaps a mausoleum, or a temple of Zeus, none knows, but it remained half finished after the emperor died for some years. When Emperor Constantine I moved the capital to Constantinople and made Christianity the official religion, he ordered it finished as the Church of the Archangels, finally being completed in the year 326 A.D. The diameter of the dome is 24,50 meters, and its height 30 meters. It was covered in mosaics, fragments of which survive.

The Rotunda is therefore a serious contender for the title of the oldest church building in the world, although today it is owned by the Ephorate of Byzantine Antiquities and not the Church.






General view today


As it was built. Today the central part survives and the protruding sanctuary.
The dome suffered damage during the centuries and was encased in further brickwork, possibly to counter the outward pushing forces that no longer vented to the outer aisle, that was removed either from damage or intend.
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Old December 27th, 2016, 11:34 AM   #109
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Interior

The original design called for an oculus in the dome and the interior covered in marble
It was finished as a church, with a enclosed dome and covered in gold mosaics.
These date from the time it was built.

Note the walls that are 6.3 meters thick, that give the building tremendous mass inertia and torque, that helped it withstand 1.710 years of earthquakes








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Old December 27th, 2016, 04:46 PM   #110
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What I always liked about the Rotunda was/is the side arches which appear to be both structural (they probably give support) and decorative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ayanamikun View Post
Although not very sure its admission in this thread, the Rotunda in Thessaloniki is considered part of its byzantine past. Also it is one of the most important buildings in the history of architecture and technically relevant to this thread

Rotunda, Church of Agios Georgios

Area: city center, Thessaloniki
Type: domed circular
Date: 306 A.D.


UNESCO world heritage site

Built by Roman Emperor Galerius in similar fashion to the Pantheon in Rome, in this case using bricks instead of concrete.

For what it was originally intended for is unknown, but Galerius died in 311 A.D. before it was finished. Perhaps a mausoleum, or a temple of Zeus, none knows, but it remained half finished after the emperor died for some years. When Emperor Constantine I moved the capital to Constantinople and made Christianity the official religion, he ordered it finished as the Church of the Archangels, finally being completed in the year 326 A.D. The diameter of the dome is 24,50 meters, and its height 30 meters. It was covered in mosaics, fragments of which survive.

The Rotunda is therefore a serious contender for the title of the oldest church building in the world, although today it is owned by the Ephorate of Byzantine Antiquities and not the Church.








As it was built. Today the central part survives and the protruding sanctuary.
The dome suffered damage during the centuries and was encased in further brickwork, possibly to counter the outward pushing forces that no longer vented to the outer aisle, that was removed either from damage or intend.
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Old December 27th, 2016, 04:52 PM   #111
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I don't think that Rotunda's exterior has anything that resembles decoration to begin with. Not today at least.
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Old December 27th, 2016, 06:59 PM   #112
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Oh come on, it looks great, the arches appear simple, yet decorative. If I'm not wrong Hosios Loukas also has such supportive arches? They look simple, structural, yet decorative, isn't that why we love Byzantine architecture, like it was said it might not be as wealthy as other types of churches, styles but it certainly has its charms.
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Old December 27th, 2016, 07:06 PM   #113
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Prilep, church of St. Transfiguration. It is not Byzantine (built in 1871), but it takes some inspiration and the clock tower also seems to take some inspiration.

Prilep by Natalie, on Flickr

Prilep by Natalie, on Flickr
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Old December 28th, 2016, 11:14 AM   #114
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Porta Panagia

Area: Pyli, Arta
Type: three aisled cross-roofed basilica with cross-in-square domed narthex
Date: 1283


This is rare compilation of two/three types into one that is very rare, in fact unique, I don't know of another example like that.
The oldest part, the basilica, is from 1283, while the rest was added in 1300s







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Old December 29th, 2016, 12:22 PM   #115
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Iasonos Sosipatrou

Area: Anemomylos, Corfu
Type: two-columned cross-in-square
Date: around 1000 A.D.



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Old December 29th, 2016, 12:33 PM   #116
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Agios Athanasios Pantanassas

Area: Monemvasia, Peloponnese
Type: 5 domed octagonal
Date: 12th century




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Old December 29th, 2016, 12:46 PM   #117
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Too many examples, every time I search one, two more come up near by, Greece is literally covered by these small churches and I am getting a bit fatigued with this routine.
This thread is turning into a list. In any case, you got the idea, and the general architectural culture of these structures.
Stone and brick masonry, in latter ages irregular, ceramic roofs with small diameter domes. Small windows, and few surviving decorations due to the nature of Byzantine murals.
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Old December 29th, 2016, 06:41 PM   #118
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Panagia Krinas

Area: Vavilon area, Chios
Type: octagonal
Date: 1197 A.D.


This one is off the trail, recently restored but hard to find. Very good example of masonry.
Note that many of these byzantine churches in Greece are closed and you cannot enter them.
Usually they held mass once a year if at all, or they get rented for weddings or sth.



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Old December 29th, 2016, 09:03 PM   #119
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It would be nice if we could see some examples from the other neighboring countries like Serbia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Albania (?) - I believe there are some very interesting churches and other buildings from the Byzantine era.
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Old December 30th, 2016, 12:45 AM   #120
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Indeed. Although I still have a large list of churches that I will try to post. There is also the issue with the many monasteries, of which usually only their main church dates to the byzantine era, a byproduct of the "monasterization" of the ottoman era.
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