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Old April 12th, 2007, 05:35 PM   #341
raymond_tung88
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Is that piece of reclaimed land next to the convention centre extension going to be reclaimed as well? I remember hearing somewhere that it wasn't...
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Old April 12th, 2007, 07:06 PM   #342
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Quote:
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Is that piece of reclaimed land next to the convention centre extension going to be reclaimed as well? I remember hearing somewhere that it wasn't...
No. That will stay as sea for now.
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Old April 12th, 2007, 07:27 PM   #343
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Is that piece of reclaimed land next to the convention centre extension going to be reclaimed as well? I remember hearing somewhere that it wasn't...
This project, Central Reclamation Phase III, stops just pass the Citic Tower (the tall silver building.)

But Wan Chai Reclamation Phase II proposes to fill that gap and on the other side of convention towards Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter. This project is under review at this moment.
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Old April 13th, 2007, 12:45 AM   #344
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Hong Kong party demands UN protection for harbour

Thu Apr 12, 3:46 AM ET

HONG KONG (AFP) - Hong Kong's main political party called Thursday on the government to seek UN protection for the city's famous harbour, which is under threat from reclamation and development.
Protection of the harbour has become a key concern of conservationists in Hong Kong who view Victoria Harbour not only as a lucrative tourist asset but an essential part of the maritime city's cultural heritage. However, near-continuous reclamation over the past century has reduced the waterway to half its original size.

The Democratic Alliance for the Progress and Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB) urged the Beijing-backed government of the southern Chinese territory to seek World Heritage status.

In a policy paper the pro-government party, which dominates the territory's legislature, called on Hong Kong to follow the lead of neighbouring Macau and seek listing from the United Nations.
More than 20 sites of historical importance -- some dating back to the 16th century -- in the centre of the Macau, also a largely autonomous territory of southern China, were included on the list in 2005.

Listing obliges countries to protect sites from developers and plunderers, and makes them eligible to receive United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) grants.

Widespread public anger greeted the government's most recent reclamation of 23 hectares (57 acres) of land from the shore of the island's Central business and shopping district to build a road bypass to ease congestion. The works were agreed despite the government passing a law a year earlier that was designed to prevent further reclamation.

Until now, conservation activists have been drawn largely from opposition ranks and the save-the-harbour campaign has been labelled anti-government as a result.
"That the DAB has proposed this shows that the harbour's proper management is not anti-government or anti-development," said Paul Zimmerman, who heads Designing Harbour District, a planning group campaigning for better use of the waterway.

The DAB paper said Hong Kong could benefit from China's survey of sites it would consider proposing for listing with UNESCO later in the year.

Zimmerman agreed, saying other key Hong Kong heritage and sites of cultural significance, such as the space-age downtown HSBC building and Cantonese opera and tea houses, could also get a chance of protection.

"The point is, this sort of survey has never been done in Hong Kong," he said.

"The DAB proposal is excellent because it could get everybody -- the community and the government -- focused on what is worth preserving," he added.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070412...r_070412074610
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Old April 13th, 2007, 02:02 AM   #345
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interesting stuff there.

going back to the footbridge thing, i fully appreciate how useful footbridges can be in HK, especially in the busier streets in central. they're amazing when you're in a rush and a godsend in a rainstorm. i just thought this one was a little unnecessary and was taking life away from street level for no real reason. i wondered whether it was to keep people away from the building works over the next few years. it would be a shame if this bridge stayed as it is when the waterfront park is finished.
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Old April 17th, 2007, 07:32 PM   #346
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Old April 17th, 2007, 08:19 PM   #347
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roneys_today View Post
interesting stuff there.

going back to the footbridge thing, i fully appreciate how useful footbridges can be in HK, especially in the busier streets in central. they're amazing when you're in a rush and a godsend in a rainstorm. i just thought this one was a little unnecessary and was taking life away from street level for no real reason. i wondered whether it was to keep people away from the building works over the next few years. it would be a shame if this bridge stayed as it is when the waterfront park is finished.
That section extends to the ferry is to keep people above ground all the way from the Central core to the ferries without walking up and down.

The footbridge will not be taken down even the waterfront project is finished.
There is no street life there anyways. The park will stop on the east side of that footbridge; and on the west will maintain as a roadway, bus stop and will be a highway interchange. Plus, under the bridge, there is a wide covered sidewalk as well. If someone prefers to walk at ground level, s/he can do it also.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 07:15 PM   #348
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Who's guilty on the harbour?
1 March 2007
South China Morning Post

Hongkongers concerned about heritage and the environment should spare a thought for Ho Loy, who led the protest against the demolition of the Star Ferry clock tower in December. She has been charged with two criminal offences: damaging the canvas covering the scaffolding at the fenced-off pier, and possessing an offensive weapon - a paper cutter - that she used to cut the canvas to gain entry to the clock tower. She pleaded not guilty and her case will be heard in May.

The facts behind this unfortunate episode shows that the government is by no means blameless.

The demolition of the Star Ferry and Queen's piers was planned as part of phase three of the Central reclamation. Although the Protection of the Harbour Ordinance was enacted in 1997, the government gazetted a plan in 1998 to reclaim 38 hectares of the harbour at Central. The Legislative Council condemned the plan, 45 votes to zero, which halted it.

Those 38 hectares formed only a minor part of the 584 hectares of harbour reclamation that the government had gazetted despite the ordinance.

In 2002, the government reduced the scale of reclamation to 23 hectares and submitted the new phase-three plan for public consultation and for approval by the Town Planning Board. But the government justified the plan with an incorrect interpretation of the harbour ordinance: showing some public benefit, it said, was enough to prove compliance with the law. That misled the board and the public.

The government's interpretation was successfully challenged in the law courts by the Society for Protection of the Harbour. The court ruled that "public benefit" was not enough, and that an "overriding public need" for the reclamation must be established.

Knowing only too well about the pending legal challenge, but before the courts could pronounce judgment, the government hastily signed the phase three contract with the current contractor. The government's action was challenged in legal proceedings by another contractor who had also tendered for the contract.

The government lost, and was criticised by the arbitration panel for having entered into a contract with "undue haste". The government has not published the amount of damages it had to pay, but it must be in the millions.

In subsequent legal proceedings begun by the Society for Protection of the Harbour, the court was confronted with a fait accompli.

The government argued successfully that, because the contract had already been awarded, stopping the reclamation would be very costly. So the court refused to order the work halted.

The conclusion is clear. The third phase of the Central reclamation was never properly considered by the Town Planning Board, nor was the public ever properly consulted.

The government owes the community an explanation for its culpable and extraordinary behaviour in failing to comply with proper procedure.

It has led to the loss of a major piece of Hong Kong's historic heritage, the Central harbour, and millions of dollars in damages being paid out of the public purse.

Had the government followed proper procedure, phase three might never have been approved by the public or the planning board, and

Ho's protest might not have been necessary.

It is amazing that the government disregarded a planning board directive that the reclamation plan be reviewed - and a legislators' motion urging the government "to immediately suspend the demolition works of the Star Ferry pier and expeditiously convene an experts' meeting, so as to examine the various preservation options".

By its high-handed and hasty demolition of the Star Ferry pier, the government again presented the community with a fait accompli.

The clock tower is gone. And Chief Executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen expresses regret - but did not salvage matters when he could have.Christine Loh Kung-wai is chief executive of the think-tank Civic Exchange. [email protected]
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Old April 20th, 2007, 01:15 AM   #349
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Not really sure what to say. I understand the need for more residential and commercial space in HK, but come on, when is the gov't or the ppl going to realize that reclaiming land has go to stop?!?! Nature was there for a reason: so we could conquer it; but there is also a point where we have to respect it or one day it will seek vengeance on our future and our children.
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Old April 20th, 2007, 02:32 AM   #350
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A balance between destruction and creation has to be observed. Personally, I think its time the government looked inwards and redeveloped land that's been there for 40 years or more.

I know its probably tougher, more expensive, etc, but... if we keep going, HK wont have islands anymore, it'll all be just one fat piece of land.
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Old April 20th, 2007, 06:00 AM   #351
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Keep in mind where the reclamation is happening and the extent. Hong Kong has over 200 islands. It's not going to turn into one giant island any time soon. Major reclamation efforts are focussed on Kowloon (Kai Tak & Kwai Chung), Hong Kong Island (north shore projects), and Chek Lap Kok (proposed 3rd runway). These are the more famous ones that will have a significant ecological impact.
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Old April 20th, 2007, 07:38 PM   #352
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Old April 20th, 2007, 11:57 PM   #353
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladisimo View Post
A balance between destruction and creation has to be observed. Personally, I think its time the government looked inwards and redeveloped land that's been there for 40 years or more.

I know its probably tougher, more expensive, etc, but... if we keep going, HK wont have islands anymore, it'll all be just one fat piece of land.
That point has come. Reclamation on both sides of Victoria Harbour has come to the end; and will not have further reclamation after the Central and Wan Chai reclamation projects are done in the next decade or two. HKers have recongized the problem of over reclamation; but we have to do these last two to three reclamation projects to complete the reclamation project began in th 90s.

The problems we have now were not recongized back 15-20 years ago. But the overall project master plan has Central Reclamation Phase I, II and III and Wan Chai Reclamation Phase I and II. We are in the middle of the entire reclamation project. The problems we are having today, such as fast moving water and dead water, are supposed to be temproary. If everything just stops and the shoreline is left as what today is, those problems will become permanent. We must go on with the ongoing project to complete the whole project.

On the other hands, we are start doing urban renewal in different parts of the cities. Some of the on bigger going projects include: Tai Yuen St/Lei Tung St, Wan Chai;Kwun Tong Town Centre; Fa Yuen St/Sai Yee St, Mong Kok; and Lower Mid-level, Central/Sheung Wan. Other small projects are also happening in Sham Shui Po, Tai Kok Tsui and western part of HKI.
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Old April 21st, 2007, 06:45 AM   #354
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RTHK news:
Activists in 11th hour bid to persuade govt to save Queen's Pier
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Old April 24th, 2007, 03:30 AM   #355
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Quote:
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Keep in mind where the reclamation is happening and the extent. Hong Kong has over 200 islands. It's not going to turn into one giant island any time soon. Major reclamation efforts are focussed on Kowloon (Kai Tak & Kwai Chung), Hong Kong Island (north shore projects), and Chek Lap Kok (proposed 3rd runway). These are the more famous ones that will have a significant ecological impact.
Yes, I know, but it still amazes me how much land has been filled up over time. The natural shores of the most prominent islands have now been replaced by straight edges.

I'm not saying tha tI dont like the new land being reclaimed, but looking back, it still strikes me time after time. I was looking at an old (1996) edition of Hong Kong Street (government publication thing my dad got for free) and comparing it to HK in wikimapia, and so much has been filled out, particularly Tsing Yi and Lantau North.

BTW, are they still going to fill out the harbor between the runway and Kowloon Bay?

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
That point has come. Reclamation on both sides of Victoria Harbour has come to the end; and will not have further reclamation after the Central and Wan Chai reclamation projects are done in the next decade or two. HKers have recongized the problem of over reclamation; but we have to do these last two to three reclamation projects to complete the reclamation project began in th 90s.
That's good news, I realized (again) how far the reclamation was. I was looking at an old (1996) edition of HK Street and I saw that the harbour to the west (TKO and Tiu Keng Leng) was nonexistent back in the day, but now they are filled.

I might post a picture of then and now for some comparison. I dont know if anyone else might, but I found it quite fascinating.
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Old April 24th, 2007, 04:11 AM   #356
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BTW, are they still going to fill out the harbor between the runway and Kowloon Bay?
Not sure yet. It depends on the finding form the EIS (environmental impact study.) The problem is that gap between the old runway Kowloon Bay has very limited water flow out to the main harbour trapping dirty water inside causing odor problem in the area.

But on the other side of the runway will not be filled as I know.
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Old April 27th, 2007, 11:45 AM   #357
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Demonstrators protest Hong Kong pier closure
Wed Apr 25, 2:25 PM ET

HONG KONG (AFP) - Protesters gathered on Hong Kong's downtown harbourside Wednesday night to oppose the closure of a historic pier that has become a symbol of a campaign to save the city's architectural heritage.

Conservationists carrying banners that read "do not move" and "leave alone" called for the preservation of Queen's Pier, which was boarded up at midnight and will be demolished.

Its closure is part of a broader redevelopment plan that will see a huge swathe reclaimed from the famous Victoria Harbour to make way for a congestion-relieving bypass.

The nearby Star Ferry pier was demolished last year, sparking furious protests and scuffles between conservationists and police.

To avoid similar disturbances, the government has said it will consider dismantling Queen's Pier and rebuilding it nearby.

Rows over the demolition sparked renewed concern for the fate of Hong Kong's heritage buildings, which preservationists say are being rapidly destroyed to make way for lucrative real estate projects.
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Old April 27th, 2007, 01:28 PM   #358
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Central Pier Number 9(New) at night.
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Old April 27th, 2007, 06:47 PM   #359
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 06:49 PM   #360
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Last effort to keep pier close to its current site
Hong Kong Standard
Wednesday, May 02, 2007

Civic Party legislator Alan Leong Kah- kit is to make a last-ditch effort to keep Queen's Pier close to its present position and in line with other historic waterfront buildings.

Though the pro-government camp defeated an earlier attempt to preserve the pier at its current site next to City Hall, Leong will today propose a nonbinding motion at the Legislative Council calling on the government to adopt the Chinese Cultural Heritage Conservation Benchmark - which not only preserves the building or site, but also ensures it remains within its surrounding environment and settings.

Leong said Tuesday the government's handling of the Queen's Pier issue has been very unreasonable.

"As one of my friends has suggested, the government has already executed the queen but is now dragging her corpse around without saying where it will be buried," Leong said.

The government earlier said the building would be demolished to allow for the construction of a waterfront road, but that it would be reassembled at a suitable site. But it has so far refused to say where this site will be.

"The government says it understands the people's wish in conserving this cultural heritage. But actually, what it is doing shows it is merely following its preset policies. Officials are simply reluctant to change their plans and have no intention of making any adjustment."

Leong agreed his last-ditch attempt may not succeed given that councillors had vetoed a motion last month to preserve the building at its present site.

"Several landmarks in Central - including Queen's Pier, City Hall, Legco, the government headquarters and Government House - are a cluster of structures which were at the center of local political history," Leong said.

"Should the government have a real heart to preserve the place, it should not only preserve the structure of Queen's Pier, but also ensure it remains a waterfront building in line with City Hall and the Legco building."

Legco's public works subcommittee will next week examine the government's funding request for the dismantling of the pier, and the Antiquities and Monuments Office is to discuss next Wednesday whether the pier should be declared a historic monument.

Meanwhile, Leong said he was not angry or surprised at being dropped last week from the board of directors of the Urban Renewal Authority after two years of service.

However, he could not hide his disappointment at the government's mechanism in appointing members to statutory and advisory bodies.

"The government expects those who are appointed to statutory bodies to shut up and not express any opposing view to the public," he said.

"It doesn't really matter that I have not been reappointed to the authority. After all, if I really want to work for the people, then there is no point in staying there."
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